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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8592
Ovid, Tristia, 3.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Horace, Odes, 3.11, 3.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.11. 1. And now Vespasian, with his son Titus, had tarried some time at Ptolemais, and had put his army in order. But when Placidus, who had overrun Galilee, and had besides slain a number of those whom he had caught (which were only the weaker part of the Galileans, and such as were of timorous souls) 3.11. This excursion was led on by three men, who were the chief of them all, both for strength and sagacity; Niger, called the Peraite, Silas of Babylon, and besides them John the Essene.
2. Livy, History, 1.12.3-1.12.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Amores, 1.1.19, 1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.34, 3.119-3.122 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 4.949-4.954 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.949. At her kinsman’s threshold: so the Senators justly decreed. 4.950. Phoebus takes part of the space there: a further part remain 4.951. For Vesta, and the third part that’s left, Caesar occupies. 4.952. Long live the laurels of the Palatine: long live that house 4.953. Decked with branches of oak: one place holds three eternal gods.
7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.175-1.176, 1.185-1.205, 1.452-1.465, 1.477-1.479, 1.515-1.518, 1.546-1.547, 1.553-1.567, 15.871-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Tristia, 1.1.1, 2.253-2.312, 4.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.31-2.1.34, 2.31-2.32, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE

10. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.5, 1.8, 4.655, 6.752-6.892, 8.306-8.369, 8.671-8.713, 10.495-10.505 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.5. by violence of Heaven, to satisfy 1.8. the city, and bring o'er his fathers' gods 4.655. Thus frantic Pentheus flees the stern array 6.752. Came on my view; their hands made stroke at Heaven 6.753. And strove to thrust Jove from his seat on high. 6.754. I saw Salmoneus his dread stripes endure 6.755. Who dared to counterfeit Olympian thunder 6.756. And Jove's own fire. In chariot of four steeds 6.757. Brandishing torches, he triumphant rode 6.758. Through throngs of Greeks, o'er Elis ' sacred way 6.759. Demanding worship as a god. 0 fool! 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.767. Stretched o'er nine roods he lies; a vulture huge 6.768. Tears with hooked beak at his immortal side 6.769. Or deep in entrails ever rife with pain 6.770. Gropes for a feast, making his haunt and home 6.771. In the great Titan bosom; nor will give 6.772. To ever new-born flesh surcease of woe. 6.773. Why name Ixion and Pirithous 6.774. The Lapithae, above whose impious brows 6.775. A crag of flint hangs quaking to its fall 6.776. As if just toppling down, while couches proud 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.781. A flashing firebrand, with shrieks of woe. 6.782. Here in a prison-house awaiting doom 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 6.788. Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin 6.809. So spake Apollo's aged prophetess. 6.810. “Now up and on!” she cried. “Thy task fulfil! 6.811. We must make speed. Behold yon arching doors 6.812. Yon walls in furnace of the Cyclops forged! 6.813. 'T is there we are commanded to lay down 6.814. Th' appointed offering.” So, side by side 6.815. Swift through the intervening dark they strode 6.816. And, drawing near the portal-arch, made pause. 6.817. Aeneas, taking station at the door 6.818. Pure, lustral waters o'er his body threw 6.820. Now, every rite fulfilled, and tribute due 6.821. Paid to the sovereign power of Proserpine 6.822. At last within a land delectable 6.823. Their journey lay, through pleasurable bowers 6.824. of groves where all is joy,—a blest abode! 6.825. An ampler sky its roseate light bestows 6.826. On that bright land, which sees the cloudless beam 6.827. of suns and planets to our earth unknown. 6.828. On smooth green lawns, contending limb with limb 6.829. Immortal athletes play, and wrestle long 6.830. 'gainst mate or rival on the tawny sand; 6.831. With sounding footsteps and ecstatic song 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace, in flowing vesture clad 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody 6.835. Who sweeps the numbered strings with changeful hand 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 6.841. Their arms and shadowy chariots he views 6.842. And lances fixed in earth, while through the fields 6.843. Their steeds without a bridle graze at will. 6.844. For if in life their darling passion ran 6.845. To chariots, arms, or glossy-coated steeds 6.846. The self-same joy, though in their graves, they feel. 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.854. Who kept them undefiled their mortal day; 6.855. And poets, of whom the true-inspired song 6.856. Deserved Apollo's name; and all who found 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 6.858. Yea! here dwell all those dead whose deeds bequeath 6.859. Deserved and grateful memory to their kind. 6.860. And each bright brow a snow-white fillet wears. 6.861. Unto this host the Sibyl turned, and hailed 6.862. Musaeus, midmost of a numerous throng 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.887. In eager welcome, spread them swiftly forth. 6.888. Tears from his eyelids rained, and thus he spoke: 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 6.891. Will Heaven, beloved son, once more allow 6.892. That eye to eye we look? and shall I hear 8.306. rolling this way and that his wrathful eyes 8.307. gnashing his teeth. Three times his ire surveyed 8.308. the slope of Aventine ; three times he stormed 8.309. the rock-built gate in vain; and thrice withdrew 8.310. to rest him in the vale. But high above 8.311. a pointed peak arose, sheer face of rock 8.312. on every side, which towered into view 8.313. from the long ridge above the vaulted cave 8.314. fit haunt for birds of evil-boding wing. 8.315. This peak, which leftward toward the river leaned 8.316. he smote upon its right—his utmost blow — 8.317. breaking its bases Ioose; then suddenly 8.318. thrust at it: as he thrust, the thunder-sound 8.319. filled all the arching sky, the river's banks 8.320. asunder leaped, and Tiber in alarm 8.321. reversed his flowing wave. So Cacus' lair 8.322. lay shelterless, and naked to the day 8.323. the gloomy caverns of his vast abode 8.324. tood open, deeply yawning, just as if 8.325. the riven earth should crack, and open wide 8.326. th' infernal world and fearful kingdoms pale 8.327. which gods abhor; and to the realms on high 8.328. the measureless abyss should be laid bare 8.329. and pale ghosts shrink before the entering sun. 8.330. Now upon Cacus, startled by the glare 8.331. caged in the rocks and howling horribly 8.332. Alcides hurled his weapons, raining down 8.333. all sorts of deadly missiles—trunks of trees 8.334. and monstrous boulders from the mountain torn. 8.335. But when the giant from his mortal strait 8.336. no refuge knew, he blew from his foul jaws 8.337. a storm of smoke—incredible to tell — 8.338. and with thick darkness blinding every eye 8.339. concealed his cave, uprolling from below 8.340. one pitch-black night of mingled gloom and fire. 8.341. This would Alcides not endure, but leaped 8.342. headlong across the flames, where densest hung 8.343. the rolling smoke, and through the cavern surged 8.344. a drifting and impenetrable cloud. 8.345. With Cacus, who breathed unavailing flame 8.346. he grappled in the dark, locked limb with limb 8.347. and strangled him, till o'er the bloodless throat 8.348. the starting eyeballs stared. Then Hercules 8.349. burst wide the doorway of the sooty den 8.350. and unto Heaven and all the people showed 8.351. the stolen cattle and the robber's crimes 8.352. and dragged forth by the feet the shapeless corpse 8.353. of the foul monster slain. The people gazed 8.354. insatiate on the grewsome eyes, the breast 8.355. of bristling shag, the face both beast and man 8.356. and that fire-blasted throat whence breathed no more 8.357. the extinguished flame. 'T is since that famous day 8.358. we celebrate this feast, and glad of heart 8.359. each generation keeps the holy time. 8.360. Potitius began the worship due 8.361. and our Pinarian house is vowed to guard 8.362. the rites of Hercules. An altar fair 8.363. within this wood they raised; 't is called ‘the Great,’ 8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows 8.366. with garlands worthy of the gift of Heaven. 8.367. Lift high the cup in every thankful hand 8.368. and praise our people's god with plenteous wine.” 8.369. He spoke; and of the poplar's changeful sheen 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 10.495. who also for the roughness of the ground 10.496. were all unmounted: he (the last resource 10.497. of men in straits) to wild entreaty turned 10.498. and taunts, enkindling their faint hearts anew: 10.499. “Whither, my men! O, by your own brave deeds 10.500. O, by our lord Evander's happy wars 10.501. the proud hopes I had to make my name 10.502. a rival glory,—think not ye can fly! 10.503. Your swords alone can carve ye the safe way 10.504. traight through your foes. Where yonder warrior-throng 10.505. is fiercest, thickest, there and only there
11. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
12. Tacitus, Annals, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1.  Rome at the outset was a city state under the government of kings: liberty and the consulate were institutions of Lucius Brutus. Dictatorships were always a temporary expedient: the decemviral office was dead within two years, nor was the consular authority of the military tribunes long-lived. Neither Cinna nor Sulla created a lasting despotism: Pompey and Crassus quickly forfeited their power to Caesar, and Lepidus and Antony their swords to Augustus, who, under the style of "Prince," gathered beneath his empire a world outworn by civil broils. But, while the glories and disasters of the old Roman commonwealth have been chronicled by famous pens, and intellects of distinction were not lacking to tell the tale of the Augustan age, until the rising tide of sycophancy deterred them, the histories of Tiberius and Caligula, of Claudius and Nero, were falsified through cowardice while they flourished, and composed, when they fell, under the influence of still rankling hatreds. Hence my design, to treat a small part (the concluding one) of Augustus' reign, then the principate of Tiberius and its sequel, without anger and without partiality, from the motives of which I stand sufficiently removed.
13. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 45.6.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

45.6.4.  After this came the festival appointed in honour of the completion of the temple of Venus, which some, while Caesar was still alive, had promised to celebrate, but were now holding in slight regard, even as they did the games in the Circus in honour of the Parilia; so, to win the favour of the populace, he provided for it at his private expense, on the ground that it concerned him because of his family.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 101, 126, 127
aeneas, founder of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 116
aeneas, shield of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 205
aeneas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 119, 120, 154
aetiology, origins, causae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
agrippa Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 128
ambiguity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 118, 132
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 119
anchises Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 119, 154
anti-/pro-augustan readings Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 132
antithesis Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
apollo and diana, eclipse jupiter and juno under augustus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 133
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
audiences, popular Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 131
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 118, 129, 205, 253
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 119, 121, 122, 125, 205
augustus/octavian, as collective construction Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 133
augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 253
augustus/octavian, as pater patriae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 126, 127, 128, 130
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 205
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91
augustus/octavian, conspiracies against Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124, 127
augustus/octavian, constitutional status of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121
augustus/octavian, early self-representations Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 127
augustus/octavian, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 121, 122, 124, 128
augustus/octavian, relation with caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121, 154
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124, 125, 126, 131
authority, augustan Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122, 127
authority, mutual constitution of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 128, 133
autocracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 119, 120, 122, 123, 128, 133, 226, 253
autonomy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91
belatedness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 130, 226
book units (epistolography) Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 72
books Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 91, 101, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 205
calendar, augustan calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
capitoline hill, eclipsed by the palatine under augustus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 133
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226, 253
civil wars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 154
clemency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 126, 131, 132
coins Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117
concordia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
consensus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 123, 124, 133
consent, conventions, solidification of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 118, 226
consent Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124, 128
copying, of behaviors Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 118, 132
copying, of texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 131, 132, 133, 205
corona civica Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 125, 128, 129
democracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226, 253
dido Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 116
divinity (of a mortal) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 116, 118
elites Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 101, 120, 123, 127, 130, 132
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31
eroticism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
exile, of ovid Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
fama Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 132, 205, 226
festivals, augustan Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
festivals, caristia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
festivals, of augustus appointment as pontifex maximus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 116, 118, 126, 130
fluidity, slippery meanings Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
focalization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 112, 127
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 118, 128
free speech Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133
genius augusti Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
hegemony Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 101, 117, 121, 128, 154, 253
hermeneutic, alibi Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 132
hermeneutic, guides Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 132, 154
hyperbole Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
ideology Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 117, 132
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 253
immortality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 132, 205
inconsistency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 126, 129
indeterminacy, hindsight Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124, 130, 154, 205
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121, 123, 154
indeterminacy, horace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 130
indeterminacy, hypermnestra Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 130
indeterminacy, of suspicion Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
indeterminacy, strategies Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91
indeterminacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 128, 129
information, scarcity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226
information, transmission across distance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 118, 217, 226
interpretive community Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 132, 253
intertextuality Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
irony, ironic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
judgment Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 101, 125, 131, 132, 133, 154, 205
juno sospita Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
jupiter Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
lares Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
lares augusti Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
lares praestiti Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
laurel Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 116, 117, 118, 130, 131, 132, 133, 253
libraries Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 91, 101, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133
literacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 128, 253
lucius caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 128
maps and mapping Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 121
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 128
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 128, 205
marriage laws Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 116
mars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121
masculinity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91
mausoleum of augustus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 127
meroë head Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 253
militarism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 127
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121, 127, 128
morality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 116, 117, 118, 133
myron Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141
numa Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121, 154
omens Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 125, 126
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 121, 122, 154
ovid, ignores the capitoline in his tour of rome in tristia Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 133
ovid Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 72
parade of heroes Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 119, 154
paternalism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 101, 116, 117, 126, 128, 130, 133
patronage Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 129, 131
personification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 118, 119
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121, 125
playfulness Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
poets, dependence on readers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 118, 125, 205
poets, on reader response Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 123, 125, 205
poets, service to empire Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226
pontifex maximus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
portraiture Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 253
power, disciplinary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 130, 131
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 118, 129, 205, 253
power, of the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 121, 122, 123, 124, 128
presence/absence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121, 205, 226
propaganda Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226
propertius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 101, 116, 118, 130, 132
prophecy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 119, 226
provinces Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 217
ptolemies Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 116, 122, 125, 131, 205, 217
reader response Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 133
reading, active Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 154, 205, 253
reading Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 72
reification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 118, 129
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 31, 118, 226
religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 121, 122, 126, 127, 130, 154
res publica, of readers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 253
revisionary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 253
rhetoric Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 119, 154
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
rivers, nile Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 205
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 130
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 154, 226
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
senate Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
sibyl Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 119
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 118, 119, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 226
silence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122, 124
slaves Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 116, 130
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 112
subjective fallacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 129
succession Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 128
surveillance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 116, 132
tacitus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
temples, of juno sospita Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 232
temples and shrines, of apollo palatinus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 133
temples and shrines, of jupiter optimus maximus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 133
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 101, 112, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 154
tiberius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 128
tibullus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 119
tomis Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 72
transcripts, hidden and public Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 119, 133
triumph, of poets and fame Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 226
underworld Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 154
vengeance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 130
venus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 116, 121
vergil Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 112, 154, 205
vesta Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 121
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 91, 119, 128, 253
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 125
voice Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 117, 124, 132
walls of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 116
wars and battles, actium, battle of Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 133
wars and battles, naulochus, battle of Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 133
women' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101