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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8590
Ovid, Metamorphoses, 8.741-8.776


Ille etiam Cereale nemus violasse securiupon succeeding funerals attend!
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Stabat in his ingens annoso robore quercusa wicked race. Shall happy Oeneus bask


una nemus; vittae mediam memoresque tabellaein the great fame of his victorious son


sertaque cingebant, voti argumenta potentis.and Thestius mourn without slaughtered ones?


Saepe sub hac dryades festas duxere choreas'Tis better they should both lament the deed!


saepe etiam manibus nexis ex ordine trunciWitness the act of my affection, shade


circuiere modum, mensuraque roboris ulnasof my departed brothers! and accept


quinque ter implebat. Nec non et cetera tantummy funeral offering, given at a cost


silva sub hac, silva quantum fuit herba sub omni.beyond my strength to bear. Ah wretched me!


Non tamen idcirco ferrum Triopeius illaDistracted is my reason! Pity me


abstinuit famulosque iubet succidere sacrumthe yearnings of a stricken mother's heart


robur; et ut iussos cunctari vidit, ab unowithholding me from duty! Aye, although


edidit haec rapta sceleratus verba securi:his punishment be just, my hands refuse


“Non dilecta deae solum, sed et ipsa licebitthe office of such vengeance. What, shall he


sit dea, iam tanget frondente cacumine terram.”alive, victorious, flushed with his success


Dixit, et obliquos dum telum librat in ictusinherit the broad realms of Calydon


contremuit gemitumque dedit Deoia quercus:and you, my slaughtered brothers, unavenged


et pariter frondes, pariter pallescere glandesdissolved in ashes, float upon the air


coepere ac longi pallorem ducere rami.unpalpitating phantoms? How can I


Cuius ut in trunco fecit manus impia vulnusendure the thought of it? Oh let the wretch


haud aliter fluxit discusso cortice sanguisforever perish, and with him be lost


quam solet, ante aras ingens ubi victima taurusthe hopes of his sad father, in the wreck


concidit, abrupta cruor e cervice profundi.of his distracted kingdom. Where are now


Obstipuere omnes, aliquisque ex omnibus audetthe love and feelings of a mother; how


deterrere nefas saevamque inhibere bipennem.can I forget the bitter pangs endured


Adspicit hunc “mentis” que “piae cape praemia!” dixitwhile twice times five the slow moon waxed and waned?
NaN


detruncatque caput repetitaque robora caeditby those first fires, and I had suffered it!


redditus et medio sonus est de robore talis:Your life was in my power! and now your death


“Nympha sub hoc ego sum Cereri gratissima lignois the result of wrongs which you have done—


quae tibi factorum poenas instare tuorumtake now a just reward for what you did:


vaticinor moriens, nostri solacia leti.”return to me the life I gave and saved.


Persequitur scelus ille suum, labefactaque tandemWhen from the flames I snatched the fatal brand.


ictibus innumeris adductaque funibus arborReturn that gift or take my wretched life


corruit et multam prostravit pondere silvam.that I may hasten to my brothers' tomb.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 23.114-23.122 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

23.114. /while yet they wailed around the piteous corpse. But the lord Agamemnon sent forth mules an men from all sides from out the huts to fetch wood and a man of valour watched thereover, even Meriones, squire of kindly Idomeneus. And they went forth bearing in their hands axes for the cutting of wood 23.115. /and well-woven ropes, and before them went the mules: and ever upward, downward, sideward, and aslant they fared. But when they were come to the spurs of many-fountained Ida, forthwith they set them to fill high-crested oaks with the long-edged bronze in busy haste and with a mighty crash the trees kept falling. 23.116. /and well-woven ropes, and before them went the mules: and ever upward, downward, sideward, and aslant they fared. But when they were come to the spurs of many-fountained Ida, forthwith they set them to fill high-crested oaks with the long-edged bronze in busy haste and with a mighty crash the trees kept falling. 23.117. /and well-woven ropes, and before them went the mules: and ever upward, downward, sideward, and aslant they fared. But when they were come to the spurs of many-fountained Ida, forthwith they set them to fill high-crested oaks with the long-edged bronze in busy haste and with a mighty crash the trees kept falling. 23.118. /and well-woven ropes, and before them went the mules: and ever upward, downward, sideward, and aslant they fared. But when they were come to the spurs of many-fountained Ida, forthwith they set them to fill high-crested oaks with the long-edged bronze in busy haste and with a mighty crash the trees kept falling. 23.119. /and well-woven ropes, and before them went the mules: and ever upward, downward, sideward, and aslant they fared. But when they were come to the spurs of many-fountained Ida, forthwith they set them to fill high-crested oaks with the long-edged bronze in busy haste and with a mighty crash the trees kept falling. 23.120. /Then the Achaeans split the trunks asunder and bound them behind the mules, and these tore up the earth with their feet as they hasted toward the plain through the thick underbrush. And all the woodcutters bare logs; for so were they bidden of Meriones, squire of kindly Idomeneus. 23.121. /Then the Achaeans split the trunks asunder and bound them behind the mules, and these tore up the earth with their feet as they hasted toward the plain through the thick underbrush. And all the woodcutters bare logs; for so were they bidden of Meriones, squire of kindly Idomeneus. 23.122. /Then the Achaeans split the trunks asunder and bound them behind the mules, and these tore up the earth with their feet as they hasted toward the plain through the thick underbrush. And all the woodcutters bare logs; for so were they bidden of Meriones, squire of kindly Idomeneus.
2. Herodotus, Histories, 8.55 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.55. I will tell why I have mentioned this. In that acropolis is a shrine of Erechtheus, called the “Earthborn,” and in the shrine are an olive tree and a pool of salt water. The story among the Athenians is that they were set there by Poseidon and Athena as tokens when they contended for the land. It happened that the olive tree was burnt by the barbarians with the rest of the sacred precinct, but on the day after its burning, when the Athenians ordered by the king to sacrifice went up to the sacred precinct, they saw a shoot of about a cubit's length sprung from the stump, and they reported this.
3. Callimachus, Hymn To Ceres Or Demeter, 33-35, 37, 86-89, 26 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Callimachus, Hymn To Delos, 285, 284 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 2.1.4, 2.16-2.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.1.4.  In the earliest age, then, the kings of Asia were native-born, and in connection with them no memory is preserved of either a notable deed or a personal name. The first to be handed down by tradition to history and memory for us as one who achieved great deeds is Ninus, king of the Assyrians, and of him we shall now endeavour to give a detailed account. For being by nature a warlike man and emulous of valour, he supplied the strongest of the young men with arms, and by training them for a considerable time he accustomed them to every hardship and all the dangers of war. 2.16. 1.  But after Semiramis had put in order the affairs of Ethiopia and Egypt she returned with her force to Bactra in Asia. And since she had great forces and had been at peace for some time she became eager to achieve some brilliant exploit in war.,2.  And when she was informed that the Indian nation was the largest one in the world and likewise possessed both the most extensive and the fairest country, she purposed to make a campaign into India. Stabrobates at that time was king of the country and had a multitude of soldiers without number; and many elephants were also at his disposal, fitted out in an exceedingly splendid fashion with such things as would strike terror in war.,3.  For India is a land of unusual beauty, and since it is traversed by many rivers it is supplied with water over its whole area and yields two harvests each year; consequently it has such an abundance of the necessities of life that at all times it favours its inhabitants with a bounteous enjoyment of them. And it is said that because of the favourable climate in those parts the country has never experienced a famine or a destruction of crops.,4.  It also has an unbelievable number of elephants, which both in courage and in strength of body far surpass those of Libya, and likewise gold, silver, iron, and copper; furthermore, within its borders are to be found great quantities of precious stones of every kind and of practically all other things which contribute to luxury and wealth. When Semiramis had received a detailed account of these facts she was led to begin her war against the Indians, although she had been done no injury by them.,5.  And realizing that she needed an exceedingly great force in addition to what she had she despatched messengers to all the satrapies, commanding the governors to enrol the bravest of the young men and setting their quota in accordance with the size of each nation; and she further ordered them all to make new suits of armour and to be at hand, brilliantly equipped in every other respect, at Bactra on the third year thereafter.,6.  She also summoned shipwrights from Phoenicia, Syria, Cyprus, and the rest of the lands along the sea, and shipping thither an abundance of timber she ordered them to build river boats which could be taken to pieces.,7.  For the Indus river, by reason of its being the largest in that region and the boundary of her kingdom, required many boats, some for the passage across and others from which to defend the former from the Indians; and since there was no timber near the river the boats had to be brought from Bactriana by land.,8.  Observing that she was greatly inferior because of her lack of elephants, Semiramis conceived the plan of making dummies like these animals, in the hope that the Indians would be struck with terror because of their belief that no elephants ever existed at all apart from those found in India.,9.  Accordingly she chose out three hundred thousand black oxen and distributed their meat among her artisans and the men who had been assigned to the task of making the figures, but the hides she sewed together and stuffed with straw, and thus made dummies, copying in every detail the natural appearance of these animals. Each dummy had within it a man to take care of it and a camel and, when it was moved by the latter, to those who saw it from a distance it looked like an actual animal.,10.  And the artisans who were engaged in making these dummies for her worked at their task in a certain court which had been surrounded by a wall and had gates which were carefully guarded, so that no worker within could pass out no one from outside could come in to them. This she did in order that no one from the outside might see what was taking place and that no report about the dummies might escape to the Indians. 2.17. 1.  When the boats and the beasts had been prepared in the two allotted years, on the third she summoned her forces from everywhere to Bactriana. And the multitude of the army which was assembled, as Ctesias of Cnidus has recorded, was three million foot-soldiers, two hundred thousand cavalry, and one hundred thousand chariots.,2.  There were also men mounted on camels, carrying swords four cubits long, as many in number as the chariots. And river boats which could be taken apart she built to the number of two thousand, and she had collected camels to carry the vessels overland. Camels also bore the dummies of the elephants, as has been mentioned; and the soldiers, by bringing their horses up to these camels, accustomed them not to fear the savage nature of the beasts.,3.  A similar thing was also done many years later by Perseus, the king of the Macedonians, before his decisive conflict with the Romans who had elephants from Libya. But neither in his case did it turn out that the zeal and ingenuity displayed in such matters had any effect on the conflict, nor in that of Semiramis, as will be shown more precisely in our further account.,4.  When Stabrobates, the king of the Indians, heard of the immensity of the forces mentioned and of the exceedingly great preparations which had been made for the war, he was anxious to surpass Semiramis in every respect.,5.  First of all, then, he made four thousand river boats out of reeds; for along its rivers and marshy places India produces a great abundance of reeds, so large in diameter that a man cannot easily put his arms about them; and it is said, furthermore, that ships built of these are exceedingly serviceable, since this wood does not rot.,6.  Moreover, he gave great care to the preparation of his arms and by visiting all India gathered a far greater force than that which had been collected by Semiramis.,7.  Furthermore, holding a hunt of the wild elephants and multiplying many times the number already at his disposal, he fitted them all out splendidly with such things as would strike terror in war;,8.  and the consequence was that when they advanced to the attack the multitude of them as well as the towers upon their backs made them appear like a thing beyond the power of human nature to understand. 2.18. 1.  When he had made all his preparations for the war he despatched messengers to Semiramis, who was already on the road, accusing her of being the aggressor in the war although she had been injured in no respect; then, in the course of his letter, after saying many slanderous things against her as being a strumpet and calling upon the gods as witnesses, he threatened her with crucifixion when he had defeated her.,2.  Semiramis, however, on reading his letter dismissed his statements with laughter and remarked, "It will be in deeds that the Indian will make trial of my valour." And when her advance brought her with her force to the Indus river she found the boats of the enemy ready for battle.,3.  Consequently she on her side, hastily putting together her boats and manning them with her best marines, joined battle on the river, while the foot-soldiers which were drawn up along the banks also participated eagerly in the contest.,4.  The struggle raged for a long time and both sides fought spiritedly, but finally Semiramis was victorious and destroyed about a thousand of the boats, taking also not a few men prisoners.,5.  Elated now by her victory, she reduced to slavery the islands in the river and the cities on them and gathered in more than one hundred thousand captives. After these events the king of the Indians withdrew his force from the river, giving the appearance of retreating in fear but actually with the intention of enticing the enemy to cross the river.,6.  Thereupon Semiramis, now that her undertakings were prosperous as she wished, spanned the river with a costly and large bridge, by means of which she got all her forces across; and then she left sixty thousand men to guard the pontoon bridge, while with the rest of her army she advanced in pursuit of the Indians, the dummy elephants leading the way in order that the king's spies might report to the king the multitude of these animals in her army.,7.  Nor was she deceived in this hope; on the contrary, when those who had been despatched to spy her out reported to the Indians the multitude of elephants among the enemy, they were all at a loss to discover from where such a multitude of beasts as accompanied her could have come.,8.  However, the deception did not remain a secret for long; for some of Semiramis' troops were caught neglecting their night watches in the camp, and these, in fear of the consequent punishment, deserted to the enemy and pointed out to them their mistake regarding the nature of the elephants. Encouraged by this information, the king of the Indians, after informing his army about the dummies, set his forces in array and turned about to face the Assyrians. 2.19. 1.  Semiramis likewise marshalled her forces, and as the two armies neared each other Stabrobates, the king of the Indians, despatched his cavalry and chariots far in advance of the main body.,2.  But the queen stoutly withstood the attack of the cavalry, and since the elephants which she had fabricated had been stationed at equal intervals in front of the main body of troops, it came about that the horses of the Indians shied at them.,3.  For whereas at a distance the dummies looked like the actual animals with which the horses of the Indians were acquainted and therefore charged upon them boldly enough, yet on nearer contact the odour which reached the horses was unfamiliar, and then the other differences, which taken all together were very great, threw them into utter confusion. Consequently some of the Indians were thrown to the ground, while others, whence their horses would not obey the rein, were carried with their mounts pell-mell into the midst of the enemy.,4.  Then Semiramis, who was in the battle with a select band of soldiers, made skilful use of her advantage and put the Indians to flight. But although these fled towards the battle-line, King Stabrobates, undismayed, advanced the ranks of his foot-soldiers, keeping the elephants in front, while he himself, taking his position on the right wing and fighting from the most powerful of the beasts, charged in terrifying fashion upon the queen, whom chance had placed opposite him.,5.  And since the rest of the elephants followed his example, the army of Semiramis withstood but a short time the attack of the beasts; for the animals, by virtue of their extraordinary courage and the confidence which they felt in their power, easily destroyed everyone who tried to withstand them,6.  Consequently there was a great slaughter, which was effected in various ways, some being trampled beneath their feet, others ripped up by their tusks, and a number tossed into the air by their trunks. And since a great multitude of corpses lay piled one upon the other and the danger aroused terrible consternation and fear in those who witnessed the sight, not a man had the courage to hold his position any longer.,7.  Now when the entire multitude turned in flight the king of the Indians pressed his attack upon Semiramis herself. And first he let fly an arrow and struck her on the arm, and then with his javelin he pierced the back of the queen, but only with a glancing blow; and since for this reason Semiramis was not seriously injured she rode swiftly away, the pursuing beast being much inferior in speed.,8.  But since all were fleeing to the pontoon bridge and so great a multitude was forcing its way into a single narrow space, some of the queen's soldiers perished by being trampled upon by one another and by cavalry and foot-soldiers being thrown together in unnatural confusion, and when the Indians pressed hard upon them a violent crowding took place on the bridge because their terror, so that many were pushed to either side of the bridge and fell into the river.,9.  As for Semiramis, when the largest part of the survivors of the battle had found safety by putting the river behind them, she cut the fastenings which held the bridge together; and when these were loosened the pontoon bridge, having been broken apart at many points and bearing great numbers of pursuing Indians, was carried down in haphazard fashion by the violence of the current and caused the death of many of the Indians, but for Semiramis it was the means of complete safety, the enemy now being prevented from crossing over against her.,10.  After these events the king of the Indians remained inactive, since heavenly omens appeared to him which his seers interpreted to mean that he must not cross the river, and Semiramis, after exchanging prisoners, made her way back to Bactra with the loss of two-thirds of her force.
6. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.179 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.760-2.832, 8.533, 8.730-8.732, 8.735-8.740, 8.742-8.778, 13.31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Propertius, Elegies, 4.6.1, 4.6.3-4.6.7 (1st cent. BCE

9. Strabo, Geography, 16.1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16.1.2. The name of Syrians seems to extend from Babylonia as far as the Bay of Issus, and, anciently, from this bay to the Euxine.Both tribes of the Cappadocians, those near the Taurus and those near the Pontus, are called to this time Leuco-Syrians (or White Syrians), as though there existed a nation of Black Syrians. These are the people situated beyond the Taurus, and I extend the name of Taurus as far as the Amanus.When the historians of the Syrian empire say that the Medes were overthrown by the Persians, and the Syrians by the Medes, they mean no other Syrians than those who built the royal palaces at Babylon and Nineveh; and Ninus, who built Nineveh in Aturia, was one of these Syrians. His wife, who succeeded her husband, and founded Babylon, was Semiramis. These sovereigns were masters of Asia. Many other works of Semiramis, besides those at Babylon, are extant in almost every part of this continent, as, for example, artificial mounds, which are called mounds of Semiramis, and walls and fortresses, with subterraneous passages; cisterns for water; roads to facilitate the ascent of mountains; canals communicating with rivers and lakes; roads and bridges.The empire they left continued with their successors to the time of [the contest between] Sardanapalus and Arbaces. It was afterwards transferred to the Medes.
10. Vergil, Aeneis, 6.179-6.182 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.179. Cocytus circles through the sightless gloom. 6.180. But if it be thy dream and fond desire 6.181. Twice o'er the Stygian gulf to travel, twice 6.182. On glooms of Tartarus to set thine eyes
11. Lucan, Pharsalia, 3.394, 3.399-3.452 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Silius Italicus, Punica, 10.527-10.534 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Statius, Thebais, 6.90-6.106 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Tacitus, Annals, 3.60-3.63 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.60.  Tiberius, however, while tightening his grasp on the solid power of the principate, vouchsafed to the senate a shadow of the past by submitting the claims of the provinces to the discussion of its members. For throughout the Greek cities there was a growing laxity, and impunity, in the creation of rights of asylum. The temples were filled with the dregs of the slave population; the same shelter was extended to the debtor against his creditor and to the man suspected of a capital offence; nor was any authority powerful enough to quell the factions of a race which protected human felony equally with divine worship. It was resolved, therefore, that the communities in question should send their charters and deputies to Rome. A few abandoned without a struggle the claims they had asserted without a title: many relied on hoary superstitions or on their services to the Roman nation. It was an impressive spectacle which that day afforded, when the senate scrutinized the benefactions of its predecessors, the constitutions of the provinces, even the decrees of kings whose power antedated the arms of Rome, and the rites of the deities themselves, with full liberty as of old to confirm or change. 3.61.  The Ephesians were the first to appear. "Apollo and Diana," they stated, "were not, as commonly supposed, born at Delos. In Ephesus there was a river Cenchrius, with a grove Ortygia; where Latona, heavy-wombed and supporting herself by an olive-tree which remained to that day, gave birth to the heavenly twins. The grove had been hallowed by divine injunction; and there Apollo himself, after slaying the Cyclopes, had evaded the anger of Jove. Afterwards Father Liber, victor in the war, had pardoned the suppliant Amazons who had seated themselves at the altar. Then the sanctity of the temple had been enhanced, with the permission of Hercules, while he held the crown of Lydia; its privileges had not been diminished under the Persian empire; later, they had been preserved by the Macedonians — last by ourselves. 3.62.  The Magnesians, who followed, rested their case on the rulings of Lucius Scipio and Lucius Sulla, who, after their defeats of Antiochus and Mithridates respectively, had honoured the loyalty and courage of Magnesia by making the shrine of Leucophryne Diana an inviolable refuge. Next, Aphrodisias and Stratonicea adduced a decree of the dictator Julius in return for their early services to his cause, together with a modern rescript of the deified Augustus, who praised the unchanging fidelity to the Roman nation with which they had sustained the Parthian inroad. Aphrodisias, however, was championing the cult of Venus; Stratonicea, that of Jove and Diana of the Crossways. The statement of Hierocaesarea went deeper into the past: the community owned a Persian Diana with a temple dedicated in the reign of Cyrus; and there were references to Perpenna, Isauricus, and many other commanders who had allowed the same sanctity not only to the temple but to the neighbourhood for two miles round. The Cypriotes followed with an appeal for three shrines — the oldest erected by their founder Aërias to the Paphian Venus; the second by his son Amathus to the Amathusian Venus; and a third by Teucer, exiled by the anger of his father Telamon, to Jove of Salamis. 3.63.  Deputations from other states were heard as well; till the Fathers, weary of the details, and disliking the acrimony of the discussion, empowered the consuls to investigate the titles, in search of any latent flaw, and to refer the entire question back to the senate. Their report was that — apart from the communities I have already named — they were satisfied there was a genuine sanctuary of Aesculapius at Pergamum; other claimants relied on pedigrees too ancient to be clear. "For Smyrna cited an oracle of Apollo, at whose command the town had dedicated a temple to Venus Stratonicis; Tenos, a prophecy from the same source, ordering the consecration of a statue and shrine to Neptune. Sardis touched more familiar ground with a grant from the victorious Alexander; Miletus had equal confidence in King Darius. With these two, however, the divine object of adoration was Diana in the one case, Apollo in the other. The Cretans, again, were claiming for an effigy of the deified Augustus." The senate, accordingly, passed a number of resolutions, scrupulously complimentary, but still imposing a limit; and the applicants were ordered to fix the brass records actually inside the temples, both as a solemn memorial and as a warning not to lapse into secular intrigue under the cloak of religion.
15. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.26.6-1.26.7, 1.27.2, 7.2.6-7.2.9, 7.4.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.26.6. Both the city and the whole of the land are alike sacred to Athena; for even those who in their parishes have an established worship of other gods nevertheless hold Athena in honor. But the most holy symbol, that was so considered by all many years before the unification of the parishes, is the image of Athena which is on what is now called the Acropolis, but in early days the Polis (City). A legend concerning it says that it fell from heaven; whether this is true or not I shall not discuss. A golden lamp for the goddess was made by Callimachus fl. 400 B.C. ? 1.26.7. Having filled the lamp with oil, they wait until the same day next year, and the oil is sufficient for the lamp during the interval, although it is alight both day and night. The wick in it is of Carpasian flax, Probably asbestos. the only kind of flax which is fire-proof, and a bronze palm above the lamp reaches to the roof and draws off the smoke. The Callimachus who made the lamp, although not of the first rank of artists, was yet of unparalleled cleverness, so that he was the first to drill holes through stones, and gave himself the title of Refiner of Art, or perhaps others gave the title and he adopted it as his. 1.27.2. About the olive they have nothing to say except that it was testimony the goddess produced when she contended for their land. Legend also says that when the Persians fired Athens the olive was burnt down, but on the very day it was burnt it grew again to the height of two cubits. Adjoining the temple of Athena is the temple of Pandrosus, the only one of the sisters to be faithful to the trust. 7.2.6. When the Ionians had overcome the ancient Milesians they killed every male, except those who escaped at the capture of the city, but the wives of the Milesians and their daughters they married. The grave of Neileus is on the left of the road, not far from the gate, as you go to Didymi . The sanctuary of Apollo at Didymi, and his oracle, are earlier than the immigration of the Ionians, while the cult of Ephesian Artemis is far more ancient still than their coming. 7.2.7. Pindar, however, it seems to me, did not learn everything about the goddess, for he says that this sanctuary was founded by the Amazons during their campaign against Athens and Theseus. See Pind. fr. 174. It is a fact that the women from the Thermodon, as they knew the sanctuary from of old, sacrificed to the Ephesian goddess both on this occasion and when they had fled from Heracles; some of them earlier still, when they had fled from Dionysus, having come to the sanctuary as suppliants. However, it was not by the Amazons that the sanctuary was founded, but by Coresus, an aboriginal, and Ephesus, who is thought to have been a son of the river Cayster, and from Ephesus the city received its name. 7.2.8. The inhabitants of the land were partly Leleges, a branch of the Carians, but the greater number were Lydians. In addition there were others who dwelt around the sanctuary for the sake of its protection, and these included some women of the race of the Amazons. But Androclus the son of Codrus (for he it was who was appointed king of the Ionians who sailed against Ephesus) expelled from the land the Leleges and Lydians who occupied the upper city. Those, however, who dwelt around the sanctuary had nothing to fear; they exchanged oaths of friendship with the Ionians and escaped warfare. Androclus also took Samos from the Samians, and for a time the Ephesians held Samos and the adjacent islands. 7.2.9. But after that the Samians had returned to their own land, Androclus helped the people of Priene against the Carians. The Greek army was victorious, but Androclus was killed in the battle. The Ephesians carried off his body and buried it in their own land, at the spot where his tomb is pointed out at the present day, on the road leading from the sanctuary past the Olympieum to the Magnesian gate. On the tomb is a statue of an armed man. 7.4.4. Some say that the sanctuary of Hera in Samos was established by those who sailed in the Argo, and that these brought the image from Argos . But the Samians themselves hold that the goddess was born in the island by the side of the river Imbrasus under the withy that even in my time grew in the Heraeum. That this sanctuary is very old might be inferred especially by considering the image; for it is the work of an Aeginetan, Smilis, the son of Eucleides. This Smilis was a contemporary of Daedalus, though of less repute.
16. Libanius, Orations, 30.9 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achelous Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
ajax Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 323
antiquity Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
aphrodisias (caria), basilica Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
aphrodisias (caria) Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
apollo Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
architecture Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
artemis Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
arykanda (lycia), asia, province of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
assyria Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
asylum Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
bactria Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
caesar, julius, at the massilian grove Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 74, 77, 80, 81
callimacheanism, callimachean models, roman appropriation of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
callimacheanism, roman Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
callimachus, and latin poets Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
caria Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
ceres Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
commentary Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
cult, local Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
cult, of artemis Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
cult, of zeus nineudios Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
diplomacy Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
dress, phrygian Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
encomium Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 80, 81
envy Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
ephesus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
erysichthon Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322, 323
euphrates Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
founder Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
grammarians Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
hecaleius, influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
hero, eponymos Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
historiography Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
homer, lucans use of Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 81
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 77
hunger Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
hymn 6 to demeter Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
identity, local/regional Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
india Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
intertextuality, of latin poets and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
leto Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
lucilius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
lydia/lydians Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
mars Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 323
metapoetic diction, fama Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 80, 81
metapoetic diction, frons Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 81
metapoetic diction, membrum Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 80
metapoetics, and criticism of latin poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
myth, foundation Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
myth, local Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
ninos Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
nymphs Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 323
ovid, as model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 74, 80, 81
ovid, metamorphoses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322, 323
ovid Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322, 323
phygia Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
phyllis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
poets, and callimachus' Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
pompey Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 80, 81
propertius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
quintilian Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
return Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
roman, empire Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
rule, rome, city of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
semiramis Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
servius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322, 323
silius italicus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 74
sithon Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
statius Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 74; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 323
theseus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
tibullus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
topoi, of deforestation of grove Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 74
troy Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 322
violence Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 74, 77, 80, 81
virgil, as model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 81
zeugma Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
zeus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38
zeus nineudios Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 38