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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8590
Ovid, Metamorphoses, 7.297-7.349


Neve doli cessent, odium cum coniuge falsuma task much greater. By the powers of Night


Phasias adsimulat Peliaeque ad limina supplexI will most certainly return to him


confugit. Atque illam, quoniam gravis ipse senecta estthe lost years of your father, but must not


excipiunt natae. Quas tempore callida parvodeprive you of your own. — Oh grant the power


Colchis amicitiae mendacis imagine cepit.great goddess of the triple form, that I


Dumque refert inter meritorum maxima, demptosmay fail not to accomplish this great deed!”
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spes est virginibus Pelia subiecta creatisher circling horns and form a perfect orb.


arte suum parili revirescere posse parentem.When these were passed, the rounded light shone full


Idque petunt pretiumque iubent sine fine pacisci.and bright upon the earth.—Through the still night


Illa brevi spatio silet et dubitare videturalone, Medea stole forth from the house


suspenditque animos ficta gravitate rogantes.with feet bare, and in flowing garment clothed—


Mox ubi pollicita est, “quo sit fiducia maiorher long hair unadorned and not confined.


muneris huius” ait, “qui vestri maximus aevo estDeep slumber has relaxed the world, and all


dux gregis inter oves, agnus medicamine fiet.”that's living, animals and birds and men


Protinus innumeris effetus laniger annisand even the hedges and the breathing leave


attrahitur flexo circum cava tempora cornu.are still—and motionless the laden air.
NaN


fodit et exiguo maculavit sanguine ferrumhe looks and beckons with imploring hands.


membra simul pecudis validosque venefica sucosNow thrice around she paces, and three time


mergit in aere cavo: minuunt en corporis artusbesprinkles her long hair with water dipt


cornuaque exurunt nec non cum cornibus annosfrom crystal streams, which having done


et tener auditur medio balatus aeno.he kneels a moment on the cold, bare ground


Nec mora, balatum mirantibus exsilit agnusand screaming three times calls upon the Night,—
NaN


Obstipuere satae Pelia: promissaque postquamO golden-lighted Stars! O softly-moving Moon —


exhibuere fidem, tum vero impensius instant.genial, your fire succeeds the heated day!


Ter iuga Phoebus equis in Hibero flumine mersisO Hecate! grave three-faced queen of these


dempserat et quarta radiantia nocte micabantcharms of enchanters and enchanters, arts!


sidera, cum rapido fallax Aeetias igniO fruitful Earth, giver of potent herbs!


imponit purum laticem et sine viribus herbas.O gentle Breezes and destructive Winds!


Iamque neci similis resoluto corpore regemYou Mountains, Rivers, Lakes and sacred Groves


et cum rege suo custodes somnus habebatand every dreaded god of silent Night!


quem dederant cantus magicaeque potentia linguae:Attend upon me!—
NaN


ambierantque torum. “Quid nunc dubitatis inertes?the rivers turn from their accustomed way


Stringite” ait “gladios veteremque haurite cruoremand roll far backward to their secret springs!


ut repleam vacuas iuvenali sanguine venas.I speak—and the wild, troubled sea is calm


In manibus vestris vita est aetasque parentis:and I command the waters to arise!


si pietas ulla est nec spes agitatis inanesThe clouds I scatter—and I bring the clouds;


officium praestate patri telisque senectamI smooth the winds and ruffle up their rage;


exigite et saniem coniecto emittite ferro.”I weave my spells and I recite my charms;


His, ut quaeque pia est, hortatibus impia prima estI pluck the fangs of serpents, and I move


et ne sit scelerata, facit scelus. Haud tamen ictusthe living rocks and twist the rooted oaks;


ulla suos spectare potest, oculosque reflectuntI blast the forests. Mountains at my word


caecaque dant saevis aversae vulnera dextris.tremble and quake; and from her granite tomb


Ille, cruore fluens, cubito tamen adlevat artusthe liberated ghosts arise as Earth


semilacerque toro temptat consurgere et interastonished groans! From your appointed ways


tot medius gladios pallentia bracchia tendensO wonder-working Moon, I draw you down


“quid facitis, gnatae? quis vos in fata parentisagainst the magic-making sound of gong


armat?” ait. Cecidere illis animique manusque.and brazen vessels of Temesa's ore;


Plura locuturo cum verbis guttura ColchisI cast my spells and veil the jeweled ray


abstulit et calidis laniatum mersit in undis.of Phoebus' wain, and quench Aurora's fires.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Euripides, Medea, 9-10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. to slay their father and come to live here in the land of Corinth with her husband and children, where her exile found favour with the citizens to whose land she had come, and in all things of her own accord was she at one with Jason, the greatest safeguard thi
2. Cicero, On Fate, 41, 21 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, On Duties, 2.23-2.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.23. Omnium autem rerum nec aptius est quicquam ad opes tuendas ac tenendas quam diligi nec alienius quam timeri. Praeclare enim Ennius: Quém metuunt, odérunt; quem quisque ódit, periisse éxpetit. Multorum autem odiis nullas opes posse obsistere, si antea fuit ignotum, nuper est cognitum. Nec vero huius tyranni solum, quem armis oppressa pertulit civitas ac paret cum maxime mortuo, interitus declarat, quantum odium hominum valeat ad pestem, sed reliquorum similes exitus tyrannorum, quorum haud fere quisquam talem interitum effugit; malus enim est custos diuturnitatis metus contraque benivolentia fidelis vel ad perpetuitatem. 2.24. Sed iis, qui vi oppresses imperio coercent, sit sane adhibenda saevitia, ut eris in famulos, si aliter teneri non possunt; qui vero in libera civitate ita se instruunt, ut metuantur, iis nihil potest esse dementius. Quamvis enim sint demersae leges alicuius opibus, quamvis timefacta libertas, emergunt tamen haec aliquando aut iudiciis tacitis aut occultis de honore suffragiis. Acriores autem morsus sunt intermissae libertatis quam retentae. Quod igitur latissime patet neque ad incolumitatem solum, sed etiam ad opes et potentiam valet plurimum, id amplectamur, ut metus absit, caritas retineatur. Ita facillime, quae volemus, et privatis in rebus et in re publica consequemur. Etenim qui se metui volent, a quibus metuentur, eosdem metuant ipsi necesse est. 2.23.  But, of all motives, none is better adapted to secure influence and hold it fast than love; nothing is more foreign to that end than fear. For Ennius says admirably: "Whom they fear they hate. And whom one hates, one hopes to see him dead." And we recently discovered, if it was not known before, that no amount of power can withstand the hatred of the many. The death of this tyrant, whose yoke the state endured under the constraint of armed force and whom it still obeys more humbly than ever, though he is dead, illustrates the deadly effects of popular hatred; and the same lesson is taught by the similar fate of all other despots, of whom practically no one has ever escaped such a death. For fear is but a poor safeguard of lasting power; while affection, on the other hand, may be trusted to keep it safe for ever. 2.24.  But those who keep subjects in check by force would of course have to employ severity — masters, for example, toward their servants, when these cannot be held in control in any other way. But those who in a free state deliberately put themselves in a position to be feared are the maddest of the mad. For let the laws be never so much overborne by some one individual's power, let the spirit of freedom be never so intimidated, still sooner or later they assert themselves either through unvoiced public sentiment, or through secret ballots disposing of some high office of state. Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered. Let us, then, embrace this policy, which appeals to every heart and is the strongest support not only of security but also of influence and power — namely, to banish fear and cleave to love. And thus we shall most easily secure success both in private and in public life. Furthermore, those who wish to be feared must inevitably be afraid of those whom they intimidate.
4. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 7.1, 7.7-7.8, 7.10, 7.15-7.21, 7.39, 7.48-7.61, 7.70-7.121, 7.149-7.296, 7.298-7.349, 7.353-7.356, 7.359-7.360, 7.365-7.367, 7.401-7.403 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.620, 10.843-10.859 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.620. the aged strength of some stupendous oak 10.843. ome larger grace, and fain would touch or change 10.844. the issue of the war, then art thou fed 10.845. on expectation vain.” With weeping eyes 10.846. Juno made answer: “Can it be thy mind 10.847. gives what thy words refuse, and Turnus' life 10.848. if rescued, may endure? Yet afterward 10.849. ome cruel close his guiltless day shall see— 10.850. or far from truth I stray! O, that I were 10.851. the dupe of empty fears! and O, that thou 10.852. wouldst but refashion to some happier end 10.854. She ceased; and swiftly from the peak of heaven 10.855. moved earthward, trailing cloud-wrack through the air 10.856. and girdled with the storm. She took her way 10.857. to where Troy 's warriors faced Laurentum's line. 10.858. There of a hollow cloud the goddess framed 10.859. a shape of airy, unsubstantial shade
6. Lucan, Pharsalia, 10.20-10.52 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Medea, 665-667, 664 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.39-1.40, 1.51-1.52, 1.60-1.63, 1.489-1.493, 1.700-1.729, 1.809-1.810, 1.812-1.814, 1.819-1.820, 1.824-1.825, 1.847-1.848, 7.48-7.54 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeetes Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
aeneas, death of Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
aeson Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 58, 59; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
alcimede Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 58, 59; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
alexander Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
bookrolls Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 141
caesar, c. julius, lucan Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 58
cicero, fear Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
civil war Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
closure Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 141
colchis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
domitian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 59
euripides, medea Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
fear, and hatred Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 59
jason Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 58, 59; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
juno, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
juno, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
juno, sen. herc. fur. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
lucan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
medea, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 59
medea, eur. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
medea, ovids met. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 59
medea, sen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
medea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
mezentius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 58
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
pelias, and/as atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 58
pelias, as mezentius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 58
pelias, feminized Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 58
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 58, 59; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
perseus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
phineus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
promachus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
rage, characteristic of tyrant Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57, 58
recitation, ancient Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 141
segues Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 141
seneca, herc. fur. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
seneca, thy. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
statius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
stoicism, fate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 59
suicide' Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 171
suicide Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 59
valerius flaccus, pessimism\u2003 Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 168
virtus, pelias attitude to Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 59