Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8590
Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.256-3.315
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 942 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

942. Causes the sacred earth to melt: just so
2. Homer, Iliad, 19.107-19.113 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

19.107. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.108. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.109. /even one of the race of those men who are of me by blood.’ But with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:‘Thou wilt play the cheat, and not bring thy word to fulfillment. Nay, come, Olympian, swear me now a mighty oath that in very truth that man shall be lord of all them that dwell round about 19.110. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. 19.111. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. 19.112. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore. 19.113. /whoso this day shall fall between a woman's feet, even one of those men who are of the blood of thy stock.’ So spake she; howbeit Zeus in no wise marked her craftiness, but sware a great oath, and therewithal was blinded sore.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 15.247 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 575, 615-619, 573 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

573. μέγιστον Ἄργει τῶν κακῶν διδάσκαλον
5. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 9.16, 9.24-9.27 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.25-2.28, 6.13-6.14 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Pindar, Paeanes, 3.8-3.58 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 11.1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Bacchae, 100, 1000-1001, 101-104, 11-12, 242-245, 286-293, 520-529, 596-599, 6, 600, 7-9, 94-99, 997-999, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. αἰνῶ δὲ Κάδμον, ἄβατον ὃς πέδον τόδε 10. I praise Kadmos, who has made this place hallowed, the shrine of his daughter; and I have covered it all around with the cluster-bearing leaf of the vine.I have left the wealthy lands of the Lydians and Phrygians, the sun-parched plains of the Persians
10. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1752-1757, 1751 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1751. At least go seek the Bromian god in his untrodden sanctuary among the Maenads’ hills. Antigone
11. Herodotus, Histories, 2.146 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.146. With regard to these two, Pan and Dionysus, one may follow whatever story one thinks most credible; but I give my own opinion concerning them here. Had Dionysus son of Semele and Pan son of Penelope appeared in Hellas and lived there to old age, like Heracles the son of Amphitryon, it might have been said that they too (like Heracles) were but men, named after the older Pan and Dionysus, the gods of antiquity; ,but as it is, the Greek story has it that no sooner was Dionysus born than Zeus sewed him up in his thigh and carried him away to Nysa in Ethiopia beyond Egypt ; and as for Pan, the Greeks do not know what became of him after his birth. It is therefore plain to me that the Greeks learned the names of these two gods later than the names of all the others, and trace the birth of both to the time when they gained the knowledge.
12. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.63.3-3.63.4, 4.2.2-4.2.3, 5.52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.63.3.  This, then, is their account: The most ancient Dionysus was an Indian, and since his country, because of the excellent climate, produced the vine in abundance without cultivation, he was the first to press out the clusters of grapes and to devise the use of wine as a natural product, likewise to give the proper care to the figs and other fruits which grow upon trees, and, speaking generally, to devise whatever pertains to the harvesting and storing of these fruits. The same Dionysus is, furthermore, said to have worn a long beard, the reason for the report being that it is the custom among the Indians to give great care, until their death, to the raising of a beard. 3.63.4.  Now this Dionysus visited with an army all the inhabited world and gave instruction both as to the culture of the vine and the crushing of the clusters in the wine-vats (lenoi), which is the reason why the god was named Lenaeus. Likewise, he allowed all people to share in his other discoveries, and when he passed from among men he received immortal honour at the hands of those who had received his benefactions. 4.2.2.  Semelê was loved by Zeus because of her beauty, but since he had his intercourse with her secretly and without speech she thought that the god despised her; consequently she made the request of him that he come to her embraces in the same manner as in his approaches to Hera. 4.2.3.  Accordingly, Zeus visited her in a way befitting a god, accompanied by thunder and lightning, revealing himself to her as he embraced her; but Semelê, who was pregt and unable to endure the majesty of the divine presence, brought forth the babe untimely and was herself slain by the fire. Thereupon Zeus, taking up the child, handed it over to the care of Hermes, and ordered him to take it to the cave in Nysa, which lay between Phoenicia and the Nile, where he should deliver it to the nymphs that they should rear it and with great solicitude bestow upon it the best of care. 5.52. 1.  The myth which the Naxians have to relate about Dionysus is like this: He was reared, they say, in their country, and for this reason the island has been most dear to him and is called by some Dionysias.,2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.,3.  And because of the kindness which the inhabitants of Naxos had shown to Dionysus in connection with his rearing they received marks of his gratitude; for the island increased in prosperity and fitted out notable naval forces, and the Naxians were the first to withdraw from the naval forces of Xerxes and to aid in the defeat at sea which the barbarian suffered, and they participated with distinction in the battle of Plataeae. Also the wine of the island possesses an excellence which is peculiarly its own and offers proof of the friendship which the god entertains for the island.
13. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.249-3.255, 3.257-3.315 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.2-3.4.3, 3.5.3, 3.10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.4.2. Κάδμος δὲ ἀνθʼ ὧν ἔκτεινεν ἀίδιον 3 -- ἐνιαυτὸν ἐθήτευσεν Ἄρει· ἦν δὲ ὁ ἐνιαυτὸς τότε ὀκτὼ ἔτη. μετὰ δὲ τὴν θητείαν Ἀθηνᾶ αὐτῷ τὴν βασιλείαν 4 -- κατεσκεύασε, Ζεὺς δὲ ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ γυναῖκα Ἁρμονίαν, Ἀφροδίτης καὶ Ἄρεος θυγατέρα. καὶ πάντες θεοὶ καταλιπόντες τὸν οὐρανόν, ἐν τῇ Καδμείᾳ τὸν γάμον εὐωχούμενοι καθύμνησαν. ἔδωκε δὲ αὐτῇ Κάδμος πέπλον καὶ τὸν ἡφαιστότευκτον ὅρμον, ὃν ὑπὸ Ἡφαίστου λέγουσί τινες δοθῆναι Κάδμῳ, Φερεκύδης δὲ ὑπὸ Εὐρώπης· ὃν παρὰ Διὸς αὐτὴν λαβεῖν. γίνονται δὲ Κάδμῳ θυγατέρες μὲν Αὐτονόη Ἰνὼ Σεμέλη Ἀγαυή, παῖς δὲ Πολύδωρος. Ἰνὼ μὲν οὖν Ἀθάμας ἔγημεν, Αὐτονόην δὲ Ἀρισταῖος, Ἀγαυὴν δὲ Ἐχίων. 3.4.3. Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας. 3.5.3. βουλόμενος δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰκαρίας εἰς Νάξον διακομισθῆναι, Τυρρηνῶν λῃστρικὴν ἐμισθώσατο τριήρη. οἱ δὲ αὐτὸν ἐνθέμενοι Νάξον μὲν παρέπλεον, ἠπείγοντο δὲ εἰς τὴν Ἀσίαν ἀπεμπολήσοντες. ὁ δὲ τὸν μὲν ἱστὸν 4 -- καὶ τὰς κώπας ἐποίησεν ὄφεις, τὸ δὲ σκάφος ἔπλησε κισσοῦ καὶ βοῆς αὐλῶν· οἱ δὲ ἐμμανεῖς γενόμενοι κατὰ τῆς θαλάττης ἔφυγον καὶ ἐγένοντο δελφῖνες. ὣς δὲ 1 -- αὐτὸν θεὸν ἄνθρωποι ἐτίμων, ὁ δὲ ἀναγαγὼν ἐξ Ἅιδου τὴν μητέρα, καὶ προσαγορεύσας Θυώνην, μετʼ αὐτῆς εἰς οὐρανὸν ἀνῆλθεν. 3.10.3. Ταϋγέτη δὲ ἐκ Διὸς ἐγέννησε 1 -- Λακεδαίμονα, ἀφʼ οὗ καὶ Λακεδαίμων ἡ χώρα καλεῖται. Λακεδαίμονος δὲ καὶ Σπάρτης τῆς Εὐρώτα, ὃς ἦν ἀπὸ Λέλεγος αὐτόχθονος καὶ νύμφης νηίδος Κλεοχαρείας, Ἀμύκλας καὶ Εὐρυδίκη, ἣν ἔγημεν Ἀκρίσιος. Ἀμύκλα δὲ καὶ Διομήδης τῆς Λαπίθου Κυνόρτης καὶ Ὑάκινθος. τοῦτον εἶναι τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος ἐρώμενον λέγουσιν, ὃν δίσκῳ βαλὼν ἄκων ἀπέκτεινε. Κυνόρτου δὲ Περιήρης, ὃς γαμεῖ Γοργοφόνην τὴν Περσέως, καθάπερ Στησίχορός φησι, καὶ τίκτει Τυνδάρεων Ἰκάριον Ἀφαρέα Λεύκιππον. Ἀφαρέως μὲν οὖν καὶ Ἀρήνης τῆς Οἰβάλου 1 -- Λυγκεύς τε καὶ Ἴδας καὶ Πεῖσος· κατὰ πολλοὺς δὲ Ἴδας ἐκ Ποσειδῶνος λέγεται. Λυγκεὺς δὲ ὀξυδερκίᾳ διήνεγκεν, ὡς καὶ τὰ ὑπὸ γῆν θεωρεῖν. Λευκίππου δὲ θυγατέρες ἐγένοντο Ἱλάειρα καὶ Φοίβη· ταύτας ἁρπάσαντες ἔγημαν Διόσκουροι. πρὸς δὲ ταύταις Ἀρσινόην ἐγέννησε. ταύτῃ μίγνυται Ἀπόλλων, ἡ δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν γεννᾷ. τινὲς δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν οὐκ ἐξ Ἀρσινόης τῆς Λευκίππου λέγουσιν, ἀλλʼ ἐκ Κορωνίδος τῆς Φλεγύου ἐν Θεσσαλίᾳ. καί φασιν ἐρασθῆναι ταύτης Ἀπόλλωνα καὶ εὐθέως συνελθεῖν· τὴν δὲ 1 -- παρὰ τὴν τοῦ πατρὸς γνώμην ἑλομένην 2 -- Ἴσχυϊ τῷ Καινέως ἀδελφῷ συνοικεῖν. Ἀπόλλων δὲ τὸν μὲν ἀπαγγείλαντα κόρακα καταρᾶται, ὃν 3 -- τέως λευκὸν ὄντα ἐποίησε μέλανα, αὐτὴν δὲ ἀπέκτεινε. καιομένης δὲ αὐτῆς 4 -- ἁρπάσας τὸ βρέφος ἐκ τῆς πυρᾶς πρὸς Χείρωνα τὸν Κένταυρον ἤνεγκε, παρʼ ᾧ 1 -- καὶ τὴν ἰατρικὴν καὶ τὴν κυνηγετικὴν τρεφόμενος ἐδιδάχθη. καὶ γενόμενος χειρουργικὸς καὶ τὴν τέχνην ἀσκήσας ἐπὶ πολὺ οὐ μόνον ἐκώλυέ τινας ἀποθνήσκειν, ἀλλʼ ἀνήγειρε καὶ τοὺς ἀποθανόντας· παρὰ γὰρ Ἀθηνᾶς λαβὼν τὸ ἐκ τῶν φλεβῶν τῆς Γοργόνος ῥυὲν αἷμα, τῷ μὲν ἐκ τῶν ἀριστερῶν ῥυέντι πρὸς φθορὰν ἀνθρώπων ἐχρῆτο, τῷ δὲ ἐκ τῶν δεξιῶν πρὸς σωτηρίαν, καὶ διὰ τούτου 2 -- τοὺς τεθνηκότας ἀνήγειρεν. εὗρον 3 -- δέ τινας λεγομένους ἀναστῆναι ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ, Καπανέα καὶ Λυκοῦργον, ὡς Στησίχορός φησιν ἐν Ἐριφύλῃ, Ἱππόλυτον, ὡς ὁ τὰ Ναυπακτικὰ συγγράψας λέγει, Τυνδάρεων, ὥς φησι Πανύασις, 1 -- Ὑμέναιον, ὡς οἱ Ὀρφικοὶ λέγουσι, Γλαῦκον τὸν Μίνωος, ὡς Μελησαγόρας λέγε ι.
16. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.37.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 41.2-41.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.26.7, 2.37.5, 9.12.3-9.12.4, 9.16.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.26.7. The third account is, in my opinion, the farthest from the truth; it makes Asclepius to be the son of Arsinoe, the daughter of Leucippus. For when Apollophanes the Arcadian, came to Delphi and asked the god if Asclepius was the son of Arsinoe and therefore a Messenian, the Pythian priestess gave this response:— 0 Asclepius, born to bestow great joy upon mortals, Pledge of the mutual love I enjoyed with Phlegyas' daughter, Lovely Coronis, who bare thee in rugged land Epidaurus . Unknown . This oracle makes it quite certain that Asclepius was not a son of Arsinoe, and that the story was a fiction invented by Hesiod, or by one of Hesiod's interpolators, just to please the Messenians. 2.37.5. I saw also what is called the Spring of Amphiaraus and the Alcyonian Lake, through which the Argives say Dionysus went down to Hell to bring up Semele, adding that the descent here was shown him by Palymnus. There is no limit to the depth of the Alcyonian Lake, and I know of nobody who by any contrivance has been able to reach the bottom of it since not even Nero, who had ropes made several stades long and fastened them together, tying lead to them, and omitting nothing that might help his experiment, was able to discover any limit to its depth. 9.12.3. The Thebans assert that on the part of their citadel, where to-day stands their market-place, was in ancient times the house of Cadmus. They point out the ruins of the bridal-chamber of Harmonia, and of one which they say was Semele's into the latter they allow no man to step even now. Those Greeks who allow that the Muses sang at the wedding of Harmonia, can point to the spot in the market-place where it is said that the goddesses sang. 9.12.4. There is also a story that along with the thunderbolt hurled at the bridalchamber of Semele there fell a log from heaven. They say that Polydorus adorned this log with bronze and called it Dionysus Cadmus. Near is an image of Dionysus; Onasimedes made it of solid bronze. The altar was built by the sons of Praxiteles. 9.16.7. There are also ruins of the house of Lycus, and the tomb of Semele, but Alcmena has no tomb. It is said that on her death she was turned from human form to a stone, but the Theban account does not agree with the Megarian. The Greek legends generally have for the most part different versions. Here too at Thebes are the tombs of the children of Amphion. The boys lie apart; the girls are buried by themselves.
19. Firmicus Maternus Julius., De Errore Profanarum Religionum, 6.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

20. Philostratus, Pictures, 1.14 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 327, 325

22. Papyri, P.Oxy., 2164



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
asclepiades Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
asclepius de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
beroë Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
chiron de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
dionysus, birth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus, heart de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54
earth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
eriphyle Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54
eurystheus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
hera Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
initiates de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
kithairon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
lightning Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
marriage rituals Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54
musaeus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
mycenaean Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
myth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nurse de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nymph de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nysa de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
olympus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orphic, see titans, zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
pledges and oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54
poetry de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
polyneices Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54
resemblances, semele/hydrophoroi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
resemblances, theban tetralogy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
resemblances, xantriae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
semele, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
sophocles, inachus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
sophocles Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
speech de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
styx, river Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 54
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
thebes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
thunder/thunderbolt Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
womb de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
zeus, zeus lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128