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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8590
Ovid, Metamorphoses, 14.805-14.828


Occiderat Tatius, populisque aequata duobusNever forgetful of the myriad risk


Romule, iura dabas, posita cum casside Mavorsthey have endured among the boisterous waves


talibus adfatur divumque hominumque parentem:they often give a helping hand to ship


“Tempus adest, genitor, quoniam fundamine magnotossed in the power of storms—unless, of course


res Romana valet et praeside pendet ab unothe ship might carry men of Grecian race.
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solvere et ablatum terris imponere caelo.catastrophe, their hatred was so great


Tu mihi concilio quondam praesente deorumof all Pelasgians, that they looked with joy


(nam memoro memorique animo pia verba notavi)upon the fragments of Ulysses' ship;


“unus erit, quem tu tolles in caerula caeli”and were delighted when they saw the ship


dixisti: rata sit verborum summa tuorum!”of King Alcinous growing hard upon


Adnuit omnipotens et nubibus aera caecisthe breakers, as its wood was turned to stone.
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quae sibi promissae sensit rata signa rapinaereceived life strangely in the forms of nymph


innixusque hastae pressos temone cruentowould cause the chieftain of the Rutuli


impavidus conscendit equos Gradivus et ictuto feel such awe that he would end their strife.


verberis increpuit pronusque per aera lapsusBut he continued fighting, and each side


constitit in summo nemorosi colle Palatihad its own gods, and each had courage too


reddentemque suo non regia iura Quiritiwhich often can be as potent as the gods.
NaN


dilapsum tenues, ceu lata plumbea fundaforgot the scepter of a father-in-law


missa solet medio glans intabescere caelo.and even forgot the pure Lavinia:


Pulchra subit facies et pulvinaribus altistheir one thought was to conquer, and they waged


dignior, est qualis trabeati forma Quirini.war to prevent the shame of a defeat.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Cicero, On Laws, 1.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.62 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.62. Those gods therefore who were the authors of various benefits owned their deification to the value of the benefits which they bestowed, and indeed the names that I just now enumerated express the various powers of the gods that bear them. "Human experience moreover and general custom have made it a practice to confer the deification of renown and gratitude upon of distinguished benefactors. This is the origin of Hercules, of Castor and Pollux, of Aesculapius, and also of Liber (I mean Liber the son of Semele, not the Liber whom our ancestors solemnly and devoutly consecrated with Ceres and Libera, the import of which joint consecration may be gathered from the mysteries; but Liber and Libera were so named as Ceres' offspring, that being the meaning of our Latin word liberi — a use which has survived in the case of Libera but not of Liber) — and this is also the origin of Romulus, who is believed to be the same as Quirinus. And these benefactors were duly deemed divine, as being both supremely good and immortal, because their souls survived and enjoyed eternal life.
3. Cicero, Republic, 2.4, 2.17, 6.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.4. Hoc cum omnes adprobavissent, Quod habemus, inquit, institutae rei publicae tam clarum ac tam omnibus notum exordium quam huius urbis condendae principium profectum a Romulo? qui patre Marte natus (concedamus enim famae hominum, praesertim non inveteratae solum, sed etiam sapienter a maioribus proditae, bene meriti de rebus communibus ut genere etiam putarentur, non solum ingenio esse divino)—is igitur, ut natus sit, cum Remo fratre dicitur ab Amulio, rege Albano, ob labefactandi regni timorem ad Tiberim exponi iussus esse; quo in loco cum esset silvestris beluae sustentatus uberibus pastoresque eum sustulissent et in agresti cultu laboreque aluissent, perhibetur, ut adoleverit, et corporis viribus et animi ferocitate tantum ceteris praestitisse, ut omnes, qui tum eos agros, ubi hodie est haec urbs, incolebant, aequo animo illi libenterque parerent. Quorum copiis cum se ducem praebuisset, ut iam a fabulis ad facta veniamus, oppressisse Longam Albam, validam urbem et potentem temporibus illis, Amuliumque regem interemisse fertur. 2.17. Ac Romulus cum septem et triginta regnavisset annos et haec egregia duo firmamenta rei publicae peperisset, auspicia et senatum, tantum est consecutus, ut, cum subito sole obscurato non conparuisset, deorum in numero conlocatus putaretur; quam opinionem nemo umquam mortalis adsequi potuit sine eximia virtutis gloria. 6.13. Sed quo sis, Africane, alacrior ad tutandam rem publicam, sic habeto: omnibus, qui patriam conservaverint, adiuverint, auxerint, certum esse in caelo definitum locum, ubi beati aevo sempiterno fruantur; nihil est enim illi principi deo, qui omnem mundum regit, quod quidem in terris fiat, acceptius quam concilia coetusque hominum iure sociati, quae civitates appellantur; harum rectores et conservatores hinc profecti huc revertuntur.
4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.56.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.56.3.  But those who write the more plausible accounts say that he was killed by his own people; and the reason they allege for his murder is that he released without the common consent, contrary to custom, the hostages he had taken from the Veientes, and that he no longer comported himself in the same manner toward the original citizens and toward those who were enrolled later, but showed greater honour to the former and slighted the latter, and also because of his great cruelty in the punishment of delinquents (for instance, he had ordered a group of Romans who were accused of brigandage against the neighbouring peoples to be hurled down the precipice after he had sat alone in judgment upon them, although they were neither of mean birth nor few in number), but chiefly because he now seemed to be harsh and arbitrary and to be exercising his power more like a tyrant than a king.
5. Horace, Odes, 3.3.9-3.3.16, 4.8.14-4.8.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Horace, Letters, 2.1.5-2.1.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Livy, History, 1.16.1-1.16.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Ovid, Fasti, 1.31-1.38, 1.535-1.536, 2.143, 3.111-3.112, 5.457-5.476 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.31. Yet there’s a logic that might have possessed him 1.32. Caesar, and that might well justify his error. 1.33. He held that the time it takes for a mother’s womb 1.34. To produce a child, was sufficient for his year. 1.35. For as many months also, after her husband’s funeral 1.36. A widow maintains signs of mourning in her house. 1.37. So Quirinus in his ceremonial robes had that in view 1.38. When he decreed his year to an unsophisticated people. 1.535. So Livia shall be a new divinity, Julia Augusta.’ 1.536. When she had brought her tale to our own times 2.143. Remus accused you, while he pardons his enemies. 3.111. The stars then ran their course, freely, unobserved 3.112. Each year: yet everyone held them to be gods. 5.457. Then at twilight they returned home grieving 5.458. And flung themselves on the hard couch, just as it lay. 5.459. The bloodstained ghost of Remus seemed to stand 5.460. By the bed, speaking these words in a faint murmur: 5.461. ‘Behold, I who was half, the other part of your care 5.462. See what I am, and know what I was once! 5.463. If the birds had signalled the throne was mine 5.464. I might have been highest, ruling over the people 5.465. Now I’m an empty phantom, gliding from the fire: 5.466. That is what remains of Remus’ form! 5.467. Ah, where is Mars, my father? If you once spoke 5.468. The truth, it was he who sent us the she-wolf’s teats. 5.469. The rash hand of a citizen undid what the wolf saved. 5.470. O how gentle she was in comparison! 5.471. Savage Celer, wounded, may you yield your cruel spirit 5.472. And bloodstained as I am, sink beneath the earth. 5.473. My brother never wished it: his love equals mine: 5.474. He offered, at my death, all he could, his tears. 5.475. Beg him by your weeping, by your nurturing 5.476. To signal a day of celebration in my honour.’
9. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.578, 3.253, 3.254, 3.255, 10.668, 10.669, 10.670, 10.671, 10.672, 10.673, 10.674, 13.623-14.608, 14.581, 14.582, 14.583, 14.584, 14.585, 14.586, 14.587, 14.588, 14.589, 14.590, 14.591, 14.592, 14.593, 14.594, 14.595, 14.596, 14.597, 14.598, 14.599, 14.600, 14.601, 14.602, 14.603, 14.604, 14.605, 14.606, 14.607, 14.608, 14.780, 14.781, 14.782, 14.783, 14.806, 14.807, 14.808, 14.809, 14.810, 14.811, 14.812, 14.813, 14.814, 14.815, 14.816, 14.817, 14.818, 14.819, 14.820, 14.821, 14.822, 14.823, 14.824, 14.825, 14.826, 14.827, 14.828, 15.165, 15.745, 15.746, 15.747, 15.748, 15.749, 15.750, 15.751, 15.752, 15.753, 15.754, 15.755, 15.756, 15.757, 15.758, 15.759, 15.760, 15.761, 15.762, 15.763, 15.764, 15.765, 15.766, 15.767, 15.768, 15.769, 15.770, 15.771, 15.772, 15.773, 15.774, 15.775, 15.776, 15.777, 15.778, 15.779, 15.780, 15.781, 15.782, 15.783, 15.784, 15.785, 15.786, 15.787, 15.788, 15.789, 15.790, 15.791, 15.792, 15.793, 15.794, 15.795, 15.796, 15.797, 15.798, 15.799, 15.800, 15.801, 15.802, 15.803, 15.804, 15.805, 15.806, 15.807, 15.808, 15.809, 15.810, 15.811, 15.812, 15.813, 15.814, 15.815, 15.816, 15.817, 15.818, 15.819, 15.820, 15.821, 15.822, 15.823, 15.824, 15.825, 15.826, 15.827, 15.828, 15.829, 15.830, 15.831, 15.832, 15.833, 15.834, 15.835, 15.836, 15.837, 15.838, 15.839, 15.840, 15.841, 15.842, 15.843, 15.844, 15.845, 15.846, 15.847, 15.848, 15.849, 15.850, 15.851, 15.861, 15.862, 15.863, 15.864, 15.865, 15.866, 15.867, 15.868, 15.869, 15.870 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Ovid, Tristia, 3.11.25 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15.5-15.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.5. and that heappeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. 15.6. Then he appeared to overfive hundred brothers at once, most of whom remain until now, but somehave also fallen asleep. 15.7. Then he appeared to James, then to allthe apostles 15.8. and last of all, as to the child born at the wrongtime, he appeared to me also. 15.9. For I am the least of theapostles, who is not worthy to be called an apostle, because Ipersecuted the assembly of God.
12. New Testament, Acts, 9.3-9.9, 22.6-22.11, 26.12-26.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.3. As he traveled, it happened that he got close to Damascus, and suddenly a light from the sky shone around him. 9.4. He fell on the earth, and heard a voice saying to him, "Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? 9.5. He said, "Who are you, Lord?"The Lord said, "I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. 9.6. But rise up, and enter into the city, and you will be told what you must do. 9.7. The men who traveled with him stood speechless, hearing the voice, but seeing no one. 9.8. Saul arose from the ground, and when his eyes were opened, he saw no one. They led him by the hand, and brought him into Damascus. 9.9. He was without sight for three days, and neither ate nor drank. 22.6. It happened that, as I made my journey, and came close to Damascus, about noon, suddenly there shone from the sky a great light around me. 22.7. I fell to the ground, and heard a voice saying to me, 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?' 22.8. I answered, 'Who are you, Lord?' He said to me, 'I am Jesus of Nazareth, whom you persecute.' 22.9. Those who were with me indeed saw the light and were afraid, but they didn't understand the voice of him who spoke to me. 22.10. I said, 'What shall I do, Lord?' The Lord said to me, 'Arise, and go into Damascus. There you will be told about all things which are appointed for you to do.' 22.11. When I couldn't see for the glory of that light, being led by the hand of those who were with me, I came into Damascus. 26.12. Whereupon as I journeyed to Damascus with the authority and commission from the chief priests 26.13. at noon, O King, I saw on the way a light from the sky, brighter than the sun, shining around me and those who traveled with me. 26.14. When we had all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew language, 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.' 26.15. I said, 'Who are you, Lord?' "He said, 'I am Jesus, whom you persecute. 26.16. But arise, and stand on your feet, for to this end have I appeared to you, to appoint you a servant and a witness both of the things which you have seen, and of the things which I will reveal to you; 26.17. delivering you from the people, and from the Gentiles, to whom I send you 26.18. to open their eyes, that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive remission of sins and an inheritance among those who are sanctified by faith in me.'
13. New Testament, Galatians, 1.15-1.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.15. Butwhen it was the good pleasure of God, who separated me from my mother'swomb, and called me through his grace 1.16. to reveal his Son in me,that I might preach him among the Gentiles, I didn't immediately conferwith flesh and blood
14. New Testament, John, 20.11-20.18, 20.26-20.29, 21.9-21.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20.11. But Mary was standing outside at the tomb weeping. So, as she wept, she stooped and looked into the tomb 20.12. and she saw two angels in white sitting, one at the head, and one at the feet, where the body of Jesus had lain. 20.13. They told her, "Woman, why are you weeping?"She said to them, "Because they have taken away my Lord, and I don't know where they have laid him. 20.14. When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing, and didn't know that it was Jesus. 20.15. Jesus said to her, "Woman, why are you weeping? Who are you looking for?"She, supposing him to be the gardener, said to him, "Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away. 20.16. Jesus said to her, "Mary."She turned and said to him, "Rhabbouni!" which is to say, "Teacher! 20.17. Jesus said to her, "Don't touch me, for I haven't yet ascended to my Father; but go to my brothers, and tell them, 'I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.' 20.18. Mary Magdalene came and told the disciples that she had seen the Lord, and that he had said these things to her. 20.26. After eight days again his disciples were inside, and Thomas was with them. Jesus came, the doors being locked, and stood in the midst, and said, "Peace be to you. 20.27. Then he said to Thomas, "Reach here your finger, and see my hands. Reach here your hand, and put it into my side. Don't be unbelieving, but believing. 20.28. Thomas answered him, "My Lord and my God! 20.29. Jesus said to him, "Because you have seen me, you have believed. Blessed are those who have not seen, and have believed. 21.9. So when they got out on the land, they saw a fire of coals there, and fish laid on it, and bread. 21.10. Jesus said to them, "Bring some of the fish which you have just caught. 21.11. Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land, full of great fish, one hundred fifty-three; and even though there were so many, the net wasn't torn. 21.12. Jesus said to them, "Come and eat breakfast."None of the disciples dared inquire of him, "Who are you?" knowing that it was the Lord. 21.13. Then Jesus came and took the bread, gave it to them, and the fish likewise. 21.14. This is now the third time that Jesus was revealed to his disciples, after he had risen from the dead.
15. New Testament, Luke, 24.13-24.35 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24.13. Behold, two of them were going that very day to a village named Emmaus, which was sixty stadia from Jerusalem. 24.14. They talked with each other about all of these things which had happened. 24.15. It happened, while they talked and questioned together, that Jesus himself came near, and went with them. 24.16. But their eyes were kept from recognizing him. 24.17. He said to them, "What are you talking about as you walk, and are sad? 24.18. One of them, named Cleopas, answered him, "Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who doesn't know the things which have happened there in these days? 24.19. He said to them, "What things?"They said to him, "The things concerning Jesus, the Nazarene, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people; 24.20. and how the chief priests and our rulers delivered him up to be condemned to death, and crucified him. 24.21. But we were hoping that it was he who would redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things happened. 24.22. Also, certain women of our company amazed us, having arrived early at the tomb; 24.23. and when they didn't find his body, they came saying that they had also seen a vision of angels, who said that he was alive. 24.24. Some of us went to the tomb, and found it just like the women had said, but they didn't see him. 24.25. He said to them, "Foolish men, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken! 24.26. Didn't the Christ have to suffer these things and to enter into his glory? 24.27. Beginning from Moses and from all the prophets, he explained to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself. 24.28. They drew near to the village, where they were going, and he acted like he would go further. 24.29. They urged him, saying, "Stay with us, for it is almost evening, and the day is almost over."He went in to stay with them. 24.30. It happened, that when he had sat down at the table with them, he took the bread and gave thanks. Breaking it, he gave to them. 24.31. Their eyes were opened, and they recognized him, and he vanished out of their sight. 24.32. They said one to another, "Weren't our hearts burning within us, while he spoke to us along the way, and while he opened the Scriptures to us? 24.33. Rising rose up that very hour, they returned to Jerusalem, and found the eleven gathered together, and those who were with them 24.34. saying, "The Lord is risen indeed, and has appeared to Simon! 24.35. They related the things that happened along the way, and how he was recognized by them in the breaking of the bread.
16. New Testament, Mark, 14.28, 16.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.28. However, after I am raised up, I will go before you to Galilee. 16.7. But go, tell his disciples and Peter, 'He goes before you into Galilee. There you will see him, as he said to you.'
17. New Testament, Matthew, 28.9-28.10, 28.16-28.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

28.9. As they went to tell his disciples, behold, Jesus met them, saying, "Rejoice!"They came and took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. 28.10. Then Jesus said to them, "Don't be afraid. Go tell my brothers that they should go into Galilee, and there they will see me. 28.16. But the eleven disciples went into Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had sent them. 28.17. When they saw him, they bowed down to him, but some doubted. 28.18. Jesus came to them and spoke to them, saying, "All authority has been given to me in heaven and on earth. 28.19. Go, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit 28.20. teaching them to observe all things which I commanded you. Behold, I am with you always, even to the end of the age." Amen.
18. Seneca The Younger, Apocolocyntosis, 9.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Tacitus, Annals, 1.2.1, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.2.1.  When the killing of Brutus and Cassius had disarmed the Republic; when Pompey had been crushed in Sicily, and, with Lepidus thrown aside and Antony slain, even the Julian party was leaderless but for the Caesar; after laying down his triumviral title and proclaiming himself a simple consul content with tribunician authority to safeguard the commons, he first conciliated the army by gratuities, the populace by cheapened corn, the world by the amenities of peace, then step by step began to make his ascent and to unite in his own person the functions of the senate, the magistracy, and the legislature. Opposition there was none: the boldest spirits had succumbed on stricken fields or by proscription-lists; while the rest of the nobility found a cheerful acceptance of slavery the smoothest road to wealth and office, and, as they had thriven on revolution, stood now for the new order and safety in preference to the old order and adventure. Nor was the state of affairs unpopular in the provinces, where administration by the Senate and People had been discredited by the feuds of the magnates and the greed of the officials, against which there was but frail protection in a legal system for ever deranged by force, by favouritism, or (in the last resort) by gold. 4.1.  The consulate of Gaius Asinius and Gaius Antistius was to Tiberius the ninth year of public order and of domestic felicity (for he counted the death of Germanicus among his blessings), when suddenly fortune disturbed the peace and he became either a tyrant himself or the source of power to the tyrannous. The starting-point and the cause were to be found in Aelius Sejanus, prefect of the praetorian cohorts. of his influence I spoke above: now I shall unfold his origin, his character, and the crime by which he strove to seize on empire. Born at Vulsinii to the Roman knight Seius Strabo, he became in early youth a follower of Gaius Caesar, grandson of the deified Augustus; not without a rumour that he had disposed of his virtue at a price to Apicius, a rich man and a prodigal. Before long, by his multifarious arts, he bound Tiberius fast: so much so that a man inscrutable to others became to Sejanus alone unguarded and unreserved; and the less by subtlety (in fact, he was beaten in the end by the selfsame arts) than by the anger of Heaven against that Roman realm for whose equal damnation he flourished and fell. He was a man hardy by constitution, fearless by temperament; skilled to conceal himself and to incriminate his neighbour; cringing at once and insolent; orderly and modest to outward view, at heart possessed by a towering ambition, which impelled him at whiles to lavishness and luxury, but oftener to industry and vigilance — qualities not less noxious when assumed for the winning of a throne.
20. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 1.18.11 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actaeon Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
aeneas Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124; Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
angels Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
apotheosis, in roman political discourse Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
apotheosis, of romulus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9, 10
apotheosis, of scipio Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9, 10
apotheosis Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24; Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
appearances Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
ara maxima Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
arachne Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
artemis Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
augustus, as triumphator Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
augustus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124, 125
augustus caesar Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
bears Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
callisto Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
catasterism Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
cicero, of julius caesar Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
cicero, of pompey Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
cicero, on apotheosis of statesmen Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
cicero, pro lege manilia Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
cicero, pro marcello Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
claudius Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
cynosura Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
daphne Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
debates Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
deified heroes, canon or catalogue of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
dictatorships of sulla and julius caesar Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
diespiter Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
doves Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
ennius Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9, 10
epiphany, of romulus-quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
festivals, carmentalia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
festivals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
forum augustum Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
helice Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
hellenistic encomia Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
hera Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
hercules Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
hierax Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
hyacinthus Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
imperial family Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
julius caesar, c. Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124
julius caesar Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
jupiter feretrius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
luciad Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
magic Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
mars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9, 10
mary magdalene Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
metamorphosis, as etiological Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
metamorphosis, audience reaction to / interpretation of Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
metamorphosis, double metamorphoses Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
metamorphosis, types of Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
metamorphosis narratives, patterns of Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
narcissus Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
nymphs Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
oenotrophi Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
ovid, epistulae ex ponto Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 125
ovid, fasti Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 125
ovid, metamorphoses Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124, 125
ovid, tristia Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 125
ovid Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
ovids poems, metamorphoses Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
paul Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
pindar Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
pleiades Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
pliny the younger Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124
pompey the great, cn. pompeius magnus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
proculus, julius Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9, 10
remus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 125
resurrection Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
ritual practices Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
rome Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24
romulus, apotheosis of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9, 10
romulus, deified, quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
romulus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124, 125; Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120; Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24; Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
scipio, apotheosis of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9, 10
statius Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124
sulla Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
tacitus Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124
thomas Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
topos Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 10
transferal' Seim and Okland, Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity (2009) 47
triumphus, augustus triple triumph Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 9
troy Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 125
vergil, aeneid Duffalo, The Ghosts of the Past: Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate (2006) 124, 125
vergil Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 120
zeus Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 24