Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8590
Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.97-1.100


mollia securae peragebant otia gentes.the earth was covered with wild animals;


Nondum praecipites cingebant oppida fossae;and traversed, with the Gods, bright ether fields:


non tuba directi, non aeris cornua flexiand lest some part might be bereft of life


non galeae, non ensis erat: sine militis usuthe gleaming waves were filled with twinkling fish;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 106-237, 25-41, 649-650, 103 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

103. Dreadful distress by scattering it afar.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 9.106-9.111 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 443-468, 478-506, 442 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

442. ὑμῖν λέγοιμι· τἀν βροτοῖς δὲ πήματα
4. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.68 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 202-204, 201 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 698 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 101-114, 96-100 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

100. εὔκηλος φορέοιτο· λόγος γε μὲν ἐντρέχει ἄλλος
8. Cicero, On Duties, 2.45 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.45. Quorum autem prima aetas propter humilitatem et obscuritatem in hominum ignoratione versatur, ii, simul ac iuvenes esse coeperunt, magna spectare et ad ea rectis studiis debent contendere; quod eo firmiore animo facient, quia non modo non invidetur illi aetati, verum etiam favetur. Prima igitur est adulescenti commendatio ad gloriam, si qua ex bellicis rebus comparari potest, in qua multi apud maiores nostros exstiterunt; semper enim fere bella gerebantur. Tua autem aetas incidit in id bellum, cuius altera pars sceleris nimium habuit, altera felicitatis parum. Quo tamen in bello cum te Pompeius alae alteri praefecisset, magnam laudem et a summo viro et ab exercitu consequebare equitando, iaculando, omni militari labore tolerando. Atque ea quidem tua laus pariter cum re publica cecidit. Mihi autem haec oratio suscepta non de te est, sed de genere toto; quam ob rein pergarnus ad ea, quae restant. 2.45.  Those, on the other hand, whose humble and obscure origin has kept them unknown to the world in their early years ought, as soon as they approach young manhood, to set a high ideal before their eyes and to strive with unswerving zeal towards its realization. This they will do with the better heart, because that time of life is accustomed to find favour rather than to meet with opposition. Well, then, the first thing to recommend to a young man in his quest for glory is that he try to win it, if he can, in a military career. Among our forefathers many distinguished themselves as soldiers; for warfare was almost continuous then. The period of your own youth, however, has coincided with that war in which the one side was too prolific in crime, the other in failure. And yet, when Pompey placed you in command of a cavalry squadron in this war, you won the applause of that great man and of the army for your skill in riding and spear-throwing and for endurance of all the hardships of the soldier's life. But that credit accorded to you came to nothing along with the fall of the republic. The subject of this discussion, however, is not your personal history, but the general theme. Let us, therefore, proceed to the sequel.
9. Cicero, On Old Age, 56-61, 55 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

11. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.2.16, 2.1.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Catullus, Poems, 64.384-64.408 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.8.1-1.8.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.8.1.  Concerning the first generation of the universe this is the account which we have received. But the first men to be born, he says, led an undisciplined and bestial life, setting out one by one to secure their sustece and taking for their food both the tenderest herbs and the fruits of wild trees. Then 1.8.2.  since they were attacked by the wild beasts, they came to each other's aid, being instructed by expediency, and when gathered together in this way by reason of their fear, they gradually came to recognize their mutual characteristics. 1.8.3.  And though the sounds which they made were at first unintelligible and indistinct, yet gradually they came to give articulation to their speech, and by agreeing with one another upon symbols for each thing which presented itself to them, made known among themselves the significance which was to be attached to each term. 1.8.4.  But since groups of this kind arose over every part of the inhabited world, not all men had the same language, inasmuch as every group organized the elements of its speech by mere chance. This is the explanation of the present existence of every conceivable kind of language, and, furthermore, out of these first groups to be formed came all the original nations of the world. 1.8.5.  Now the first men, since none of the things useful for life had yet been discovered, led a wretched existence, having no clothing to cover them, knowing not the use of dwelling and fire, and also being totally ignorant of cultivated food. 1.8.6.  For since they also even neglected the harvesting of the wild food, they laid by no store of its fruits against their needs; consequently large numbers of them perished in the winters because of the cold and the lack of food. 1.8.7.  Little by little, however, experience taught them both to take to the caves in winter and to store such fruits as could be preserved.
14. Horace, Odes, 1.2.33-1.2.36, 1.2.41, 1.2.44, 1.2.49-1.2.52, 1.29, 1.35.30, 1.35.33-1.35.36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.29. Moreover, what the Romans did to the remains of the wall; and how they demolished the strongholds that were in the country; and how Titus went over the whole country, and settled its affairs; together with his return into Italy, and his triumph. 1.29. 3. Now by this time Herod had sailed out of Italy, and was come to Ptolemais; and as soon as he had gotten together no small army of foreigners, and of his own countrymen, he marched through Galilee against Antigonus, wherein he was assisted by Ventidius and Silo, both whom Dellius, a person sent by Antony, persuaded to bring Herod [into his kingdom].
15. Horace, Epodes, 7.3-7.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.208-1.214, 5.210-5.212 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17. Ovid, Amores, 3.8.35-3.8.36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Ovid, Fasti, 1.337-1.348 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.337. Cornmeal, and glittering grains of pure salt 1.338. Were once the means for men to placate the gods. 1.339. No foreign ship had yet brought liquid myrrh 1.340. Extracted from tree’s bark, over the ocean waves: 1.341. Euphrates had not sent incense, nor India balm 1.342. And the threads of yellow saffron were unknown. 1.343. The altar was happy to fume with Sabine juniper 1.344. And the laurel burned with a loud crackling. 1.345. He was rich, whoever could add violet 1.346. To garlands woven from meadow flowers. 1.347. The knife that bares the entrails of the stricken bull 1.348. Had no role to perform in the sacred rites.
19. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.5-1.7, 1.57, 1.76-1.99, 1.101-1.150, 1.152, 1.179-1.180, 1.185-1.205, 1.237, 1.251-1.252, 1.262-1.437, 15.6, 15.60-15.478, 15.870-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Propertius, Elegies, 2.14.23-2.14.24, 3.4-3.5, 3.12.3 (1st cent. BCE

21. Sallust, Catiline, 2.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

22. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.1.1-1.1.5, 1.1.53-1.1.58, 1.3.35-1.3.50, 1.10.1-1.10.12, 1.10.55-1.10.66 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

23. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.262-1.304, 6.752-6.892, 8.324-8.325, 8.625-8.728, 10.6-10.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.262. which good Acestes while in Sicily 1.263. had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away 1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 1.267. calamity till now. O, ye have borne 1.268. far heavier sorrow: Jove will make an end 1.269. also of this. Ye sailed a course hard by 1.270. infuriate Scylla's howling cliffs and caves. 1.271. Ye knew the Cyclops' crags. Lift up your hearts! 1.272. No more complaint and fear! It well may be 1.273. ome happier hour will find this memory fair. 1.274. Through chance and change and hazard without end 1.275. our goal is Latium ; where our destinies 1.276. beckon to blest abodes, and have ordained 1.277. that Troy shall rise new-born! Have patience all! 1.279. Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care 1.280. feigned hopes upon his forehead firm he wore 1.281. and locked within his heart a hero's pain. 1.282. Now round the welcome trophies of his chase 1.283. they gather for a feast. Some flay the ribs 1.284. and bare the flesh below; some slice with knives 1.285. and on keen prongs the quivering strips impale 1.286. place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. 1.287. Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green 1.288. they rally their lost powers, and feast them well 1.289. on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done 1.291. in long discourse of their lost mates they tell 1.292. 'twixt hopes and fears divided; for who knows 1.293. whether the lost ones live, or strive with death 1.294. or heed no more whatever voice may call? 1.295. Chiefly Aeneas now bewails his friends 1.296. Orontes brave and fallen Amycus 1.297. or mourns with grief untold the untimely doom 1.299. After these things were past, exalted Jove 1.300. from his ethereal sky surveying clear 1.301. the seas all winged with sails, lands widely spread 1.302. and nations populous from shore to shore 1.303. paused on the peak of heaven, and fixed his gaze 1.304. on Libya . But while he anxious mused 6.752. Came on my view; their hands made stroke at Heaven 6.753. And strove to thrust Jove from his seat on high. 6.754. I saw Salmoneus his dread stripes endure 6.755. Who dared to counterfeit Olympian thunder 6.756. And Jove's own fire. In chariot of four steeds 6.757. Brandishing torches, he triumphant rode 6.758. Through throngs of Greeks, o'er Elis ' sacred way 6.759. Demanding worship as a god. 0 fool! 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.767. Stretched o'er nine roods he lies; a vulture huge 6.768. Tears with hooked beak at his immortal side 6.769. Or deep in entrails ever rife with pain 6.770. Gropes for a feast, making his haunt and home 6.771. In the great Titan bosom; nor will give 6.772. To ever new-born flesh surcease of woe. 6.773. Why name Ixion and Pirithous 6.774. The Lapithae, above whose impious brows 6.775. A crag of flint hangs quaking to its fall 6.776. As if just toppling down, while couches proud 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.781. A flashing firebrand, with shrieks of woe. 6.782. Here in a prison-house awaiting doom 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 6.788. Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin 6.809. So spake Apollo's aged prophetess. 6.810. “Now up and on!” she cried. “Thy task fulfil! 6.811. We must make speed. Behold yon arching doors 6.812. Yon walls in furnace of the Cyclops forged! 6.813. 'T is there we are commanded to lay down 6.814. Th' appointed offering.” So, side by side 6.815. Swift through the intervening dark they strode 6.816. And, drawing near the portal-arch, made pause. 6.817. Aeneas, taking station at the door 6.818. Pure, lustral waters o'er his body threw 6.820. Now, every rite fulfilled, and tribute due 6.821. Paid to the sovereign power of Proserpine 6.822. At last within a land delectable 6.823. Their journey lay, through pleasurable bowers 6.824. of groves where all is joy,—a blest abode! 6.825. An ampler sky its roseate light bestows 6.826. On that bright land, which sees the cloudless beam 6.827. of suns and planets to our earth unknown. 6.828. On smooth green lawns, contending limb with limb 6.829. Immortal athletes play, and wrestle long 6.830. 'gainst mate or rival on the tawny sand; 6.831. With sounding footsteps and ecstatic song 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace, in flowing vesture clad 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody 6.835. Who sweeps the numbered strings with changeful hand 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 6.841. Their arms and shadowy chariots he views 6.842. And lances fixed in earth, while through the fields 6.843. Their steeds without a bridle graze at will. 6.844. For if in life their darling passion ran 6.845. To chariots, arms, or glossy-coated steeds 6.846. The self-same joy, though in their graves, they feel. 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.854. Who kept them undefiled their mortal day; 6.855. And poets, of whom the true-inspired song 6.856. Deserved Apollo's name; and all who found 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 6.858. Yea! here dwell all those dead whose deeds bequeath 6.859. Deserved and grateful memory to their kind. 6.860. And each bright brow a snow-white fillet wears. 6.861. Unto this host the Sibyl turned, and hailed 6.862. Musaeus, midmost of a numerous throng 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.887. In eager welcome, spread them swiftly forth. 6.888. Tears from his eyelids rained, and thus he spoke: 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 6.891. Will Heaven, beloved son, once more allow 6.892. That eye to eye we look? and shall I hear 8.324. tood open, deeply yawning, just as if 8.325. the riven earth should crack, and open wide 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 8.626. in safety stands, I call not Trojan power 8.627. vanquished or fallen. But to help thy war 8.628. my small means match not thy redoubled name. 8.629. Yon Tuscan river is my bound. That way 8.630. Rutulia thrusts us hard and chafes our wall 8.631. with loud, besieging arms. But I propose 8.632. to league with thee a numerous array 8.633. of kings and mighty tribes, which fortune strange 8.634. now brings to thy defence. Thou comest here 8.635. because the Fates intend. Not far from ours 8.636. a city on an ancient rock is seen 8.637. Agylla, which a warlike Lydian clan 8.638. built on the Tuscan hills. It prospered well 8.639. for many a year, then under the proud yoke 8.640. of King Mezentius it came and bore 8.641. his cruel sway. Why tell the loathsome deeds 8.642. and crimes unspeakable the despot wrought? 8.643. May Heaven requite them on his impious head 8.644. and on his children! For he used to chain 8.645. dead men to living, hand on hand was laid 8.646. and face on face,—torment incredible! 8.647. Till, locked in blood-stained, horrible embrace 8.648. a lingering death they found. But at the last 8.649. his people rose in furious despair 8.650. and while he blasphemously raged, assailed 8.651. his life and throne, cut down his guards 8.652. and fired his regal dwellings; he, the while 8.653. escaped immediate death and fied away 8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence 8.655. in Turnus hospitality. To-day 8.656. Etruria, to righteous anger stirred 8.657. demands with urgent arms her guilty King. 8.658. To their large host, Aeneas, I will give 8.659. an added strength, thyself. For yonder shores 8.660. re-echo with the tumult and the cry 8.661. of ships in close array; their eager lords 8.662. are clamoring for battle. But the song 8.663. of the gray omen-giver thus declares 8.664. their destiny: ‘O goodly princes born 8.665. of old Maeonian lineage! Ye that are 8.666. the bloom and glory of an ancient race 8.667. whom just occasions now and noble rage 8.668. enflame against Mezentius your foe 8.669. it is decreed that yonder nation proud 8.670. hall never submit to chiefs Italian-born. 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 10.6. and Teucria's camp and Latium 's fierce array. 10.7. Beneath the double-gated dome the gods 10.8. were sitting; Jove himself the silence broke: 10.9. “O people of Olympus, wherefore change 10.10. your purpose and decree, with partial minds 10.11. in mighty strife contending? I refused 10.12. uch clash of war 'twixt Italy and Troy . 10.13. Whence this forbidden feud? What fears 10.14. educed to battles and injurious arms 10.15. either this folk or that? Th' appointed hour
24. Vergil, Eclogues, 4.4-4.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.4. woods worthy of a Consul let them be. 4.5. Now the last age by Cumae's Sibyl sung 4.6. has come and gone, and the majestic roll 4.7. of circling centuries begins anew: 4.8. justice returns, returns old Saturn's reign 4.9. with a new breed of men sent down from heaven. 4.10. Only do thou, at the boy's birth in whom
25. Vergil, Georgics, 1.121-1.154 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.121. And heaved its furrowy ridges, turns once more 1.122. Cross-wise his shattering share, with stroke on stroke 1.123. The earth assails, and makes the field his thrall. 1.124. Pray for wet summers and for winters fine 1.125. Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop 1.126. Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127. No tilth makes placeName key= 1.128. Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129. Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed 1.130. Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131. The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132. Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134. Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed 1.135. See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls 1.136. Waking hoarse murmurs o'er the polished stones 1.137. And with its bubblings slakes the thirsty fields? 1.138. Or why of him, who lest the heavy ear 1.139. O'erweigh the stalk, while yet in tender blade 1.140. Feeds down the crop's luxuriance, when its growth 1.141. First tops the furrows? Why of him who drain 1.142. The marsh-land's gathered ooze through soaking sand 1.143. Chiefly what time in treacherous moons a stream 1.144. Goes out in spate, and with its coat of slime 1.145. Holds all the country, whence the hollow dyke 1.146. Sweat steaming vapour? 1.147. But no whit the more 1.148. For all expedients tried and travail borne 1.149. By man and beast in turning oft the soil 1.150. Do greedy goose and Strymon-haunting crane 1.151. And succory's bitter fibres cease to harm 1.152. Or shade not injure. The great Sire himself 1.153. No easy road to husbandry assigned 1.154. And first was he by human skill to rouse
26. Seneca The Younger, Phaedra, 484-503, 517-520, 522-525, 483 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27. Tacitus, Annals, 3.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.28.  Then came Pompey's third consulate. But this chosen reformer of society, operating with remedies more disastrous than the abuses, this maker and breaker of his own enactments, lost by the sword what he was holding by the sword. The followed twenty crowded years of discord, during which law and custom ceased to exist: villainy was immune, decency not rarely a sentence of death. At last, in his sixth consulate, Augustus Caesar, feeling his power secure, cancelled the behests of his triumvirate, and presented us with laws to serve our needs in peace and under a prince. Thenceforward the fetters were tightened: sentries were set over us and, under the Papia-Poppaean law, lured on by rewards; so that, if a man shirked the privileges of paternity, the state, as universal parent, might step into the vacant inheritance. But they pressed their activities too far: the capital, Italy, every corner of the Roman world, had suffered from their attacks, and the positions of many had been wholly ruined. Indeed, a reign of terror was threatened, when Tiberius, for the fixing of a remedy, chose by lot five former consuls, five former praetors, and an equal number of ordinary senators: a body which, by untying many of the legal knots, gave for the time a measure of relief.
28. Anon., 4 Ezra, 12, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(sea god) Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
aeetes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
aetiology Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
agriculture Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49, 115; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
allegory Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
ambition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
anchises Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
aphrodite Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
apocalypse, genre Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
apollo Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
argo, as first ship Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
augustus, golden age and Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
augustus, in horaces works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
augustus, in vergils works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
augustus Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
bacchus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
callimachus, aetia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
callimachus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
cato Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
catullus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
colchis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
culture history, cyclops, race of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
cyclical schemas of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83
cyclopes/kyklopes Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
decline, historical Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83, 109
deucalion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
didactic, function Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
earth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
ennius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
etymology, euboea Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
etymology, rhegium Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
etymology, zancle Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
etymology Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
fear, experienced by animals Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
flood narratives, in ovids works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
four- (or five‐) kingdom paradigm Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
golden age, as moral value Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 92
golden age, in georgic Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 92
golden age, in myth Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 92
golden age Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121; Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
hesiod Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
hippolytus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49, 115
honey Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
horace, epodes Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
horace, odes Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
hylas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
intertextuality Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
iron age Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
irony Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
italian peninsula Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
italy Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
jason Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
judgement, final Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
landscapes Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
law Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
linus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49, 115, 238
natura Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
natural history Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
nostalgia Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83
numa Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
ovid, metamorphoses Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
ovid Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49, 115
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
periodisation of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83, 109
perses Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
philomela Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
plants Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
primitivism Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
procne Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
progress, historical Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83
pythagoras/pythagoreanism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
reincarnation/transmigration Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
republic/republicanism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
rome/roman Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
sacrifice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
saecula Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
sallust Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
saturn Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
sicily Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
silenus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
spontaneity' Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 238
suffering, as sign of the end Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
suffering, suffering as discipline Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83
syllepsis Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
teleology\n, view of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
temporal terminology\n, saeculum Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 83
tereus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
thomas, richard Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
tibullus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
topography Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
travel Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
valerius flaccus, and apollonius rhodius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
valerius flaccus, and seneca Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
valerius flaccus, civil war in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 121
varro Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 92
varus (p.alfenus) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
vergil, aeneid Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
vergil, eclogues Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
vergil, georgics Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 77
virgil Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 49
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, and roman ideology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in agricultural writers Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in roman elegy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
xenocrates Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115
zancle Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 332
zeus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 115