Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8590
Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.237


fit lupus et veteris servat vestigia formae.the King of all above the throng sat high


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 107-201, 106 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

106. (The lid already stopped her, by the will
2. Homer, Odyssey, 10.237 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22c. And this is the cause thereof: There have been and there will be many and divers destructions of mankind, of which the greatest are by fire and water, and lesser ones by countless other means. For in truth the story that is told in your country as well as ours, how once upon a time Phaethon, son of Helios, yoked his father’s chariot, and, because he was unable to drive it along the course taken by his father, burnt up all that was upon the earth and himself perished by a thunderbolt,—that story, as it is told, has the fashion of a legend, but the truth of it lies in
4. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Odes, 1.2.1-1.2.20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 6.1215-6.1224 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Fasti, 4.709 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.5-1.7, 1.57, 1.76-1.150, 1.152, 1.166-1.180, 1.185-1.236, 1.238-1.437, 6.318, 6.339-6.381, 7.353-7.356, 8.614-8.622, 8.644-8.648, 8.660, 8.696, 8.698-8.702, 13.570, 15.96-15.103, 15.870-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 10.1-10.117 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.1. Meanwhile Olympus, seat of sovereign sway 10.2. threw wide its portals, and in conclave fair 10.3. the Sire of gods and King of all mankind 10.4. ummoned th' immortals to his starry court 10.5. whence, high-enthroned, the spreading earth he views— 10.6. and Teucria's camp and Latium 's fierce array. 10.7. Beneath the double-gated dome the gods 10.8. were sitting; Jove himself the silence broke: 10.9. “O people of Olympus, wherefore change 10.10. your purpose and decree, with partial minds 10.11. in mighty strife contending? I refused 10.12. uch clash of war 'twixt Italy and Troy . 10.13. Whence this forbidden feud? What fears 10.14. educed to battles and injurious arms 10.15. either this folk or that? Th' appointed hour 10.16. for war shall be hereafter—speed it not!— 10.17. When cruel Carthage to the towers of Rome 10.18. hall bring vast ruin, streaming fiercely down 10.19. the opened Alp. Then hate with hate shall vie 10.20. and havoc have no bound. Till then, give o'er 10.22. Thus briefly, Jove. But golden Venus made 10.23. less brief reply. “O Father, who dost hold 10.24. o'er Man and all things an immortal sway! 10.25. of what high throne may gods the aid implore 10.26. ave thine? Behold of yonder Rutuli 10.27. th' insulting scorn! Among them Turnus moves 10.28. in chariot proud, and boasts triumphant war 10.29. in mighty words. Nor do their walls defend 10.30. my Teucrians now. But in their very gates 10.31. and on their mounded ramparts, in close fight 10.32. they breast their foes and fill the moats with blood. 10.33. Aeneas knows not, and is far away. 10.34. Will ne'er the siege have done? A second time 10.35. above Troy 's rising walls the foe impends; 10.36. another host is gathered, and once more 10.37. from his Aetolian Arpi wrathful speeds 10.38. a Diomed. I doubt not that for me 10.39. wounds are preparing. Yea, thy daughter dear 10.40. awaits a mortal sword! If by thy will 10.41. unblest and unapproved the Trojans came 10.42. to Italy, for such rebellious crime 10.43. give them their due, nor lend them succor, thou 10.44. with thy strong hand! But if they have obeyed 10.45. unnumbered oracles from gods above 10.46. and sacred shades below, who now has power 10.47. to thwart thy bidding, or to weave anew 10.48. the web of Fate? Why speak of ships consumed 10.49. along my hallowed Erycinian shore? 10.50. Or of the Lord of Storms, whose furious blasts 10.51. were summoned from Aeolia ? Why tell 10.52. of Iris sped from heaven? Now she moves 10.53. the region of the shades (one kingdom yet 10.54. from her attempt secure) and thence lets loose 10.55. Alecto on the world above, who strides 10.56. in frenzied wrath along th' Italian hills. 10.57. No more my heart now cherishes its hope 10.58. of domination, though in happier days 10.59. uch was thy promise. Let the victory fall 10.60. to victors of thy choice! If nowhere lies 10.61. the land thy cruel Queen would deign accord 10.62. unto the Teucrian people,—O my sire 10.63. I pray thee by yon smouldering wreck of Troy 10.64. to let Ascanius from the clash of arms 10.65. escape unscathed. Let my own offspring live! 10.66. Yea, let Aeneas, tossed on seas unknown 10.67. find some chance way; let my right hand avail 10.68. to shelter him and from this fatal war 10.69. in safety bring. For Amathus is mine 10.70. mine are Cythera and the Paphian hills 10.71. and temples in Idalium . Let him drop 10.72. the sword, and there live out inglorious days. 10.73. By thy decree let Carthage overwhelm 10.74. Ausonia's power; nor let defence be found 10.75. to stay the Tyrian arms! What profits it 10.76. that he escaped the wasting plague of war 10.77. and fled Argolic fires? or that he knew 10.78. o many perils of wide wilderness 10.79. and waters rude? The Teucrians seek in vain 10.80. new-born Troy in Latium . Better far 10.81. crouched on their country's ashes to abide 10.82. and keep that spot of earth where once was Troy ! 10.83. Give back, O Father, I implore thee, give 10.84. Xanthus and Simois back! Let Teucer's sons 10.86. Then sovereign Juno, flushed with solemn scorn 10.87. made answer. “Dost thou bid me here profane 10.88. the silence of my heart, and gossip forth 10.89. of secret griefs? What will of god or man 10.90. impelled Aeneas on his path of war 10.91. or made him foeman of the Latin King? 10.92. Fate brought him to Italia ? Be it so! 10.93. Cassandra's frenzy he obeyed. What voice — 10.94. ay, was it mine?—urged him to quit his camp 10.95. risk life in storms, or trust his war, his walls 10.96. to a boy-captain, or stir up to strife 10.97. Etruria's faithful, unoffending sons? 10.98. What god, what pitiless behest of mine 10.99. impelled him to such harm? Who traces here 10.100. the hand of Juno, or of Iris sped 10.101. from heaven? Is it an ignoble stroke 10.102. that Italy around the new-born Troy 10.103. makes circling fire, and Turnus plants his heel 10.104. on his hereditary earth, the son 10.105. of old Pilumnus and the nymph divine 10.106. Venilia? For what offence would Troy 10.107. bring sword and fire on Latium, or enslave 10.108. lands of an alien name, and bear away 10.109. plunder and spoil? Why seek they marriages 10.110. and snatch from arms of love the plighted maids? 10.111. An olive-branch is in their hands; their ships 10.112. make menace of grim steel. Thy power one day 10.113. ravished Aeneas from his Argive foes 10.114. and gave them shape of cloud and fleeting air 10.115. to strike at for a man. Thou hast transformed 10.116. his ships to daughters of the sea. What wrong 10.117. if I, not less, have lent the Rutuli
10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.388-1.392, 3.515-3.530 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.388. And hunt the long-eared hares, then pierce the doe 1.389. With whirl of hempen-thonged Balearic sling 1.390. While snow lies deep, and streams are drifting ice. 1.391. What need to tell of autumn's storms and stars 1.392. And wherefore men must watch, when now the day 3.515. With showers of Spring and rainy south-winds earth 3.516. Is moistened, lo! he haunts the pools, and here 3.517. Housed in the banks, with fish and chattering frog 3.518. Crams the black void of his insatiate maw. 3.519. Soon as the fens are parched, and earth with heat 3.520. Is gaping, forth he darts into the dry 3.521. Rolls eyes of fire and rages through the fields 3.522. Furious from thirst and by the drought dismayed. 3.523. Me list not then beneath the open heaven 3.524. To snatch soft slumber, nor on forest-ridge 3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.526. To glittering youth transformed he winds his spires 3.527. And eggs or younglings leaving in his lair 3.528. Towers sunward, lightening with three-forked tongue. 3.529. of sickness, too, the causes and the sign 3.530. I'll teach thee. Loathly scab assails the sheep
11. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.8.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.8.1. ἐπανάγωμεν δὲ νῦν πάλιν ἐπὶ τὸν Πελασγόν, ὃν Ἀκουσίλαος μὲν Διὸς λέγει καὶ Νιόβης, καθάπερ ὑπέθεμεν, Ἡσίοδος δὲ αὐτόχθονα. τούτου καὶ τῆς Ὠκεανοῦ θυγατρὸς Μελιβοίας, ἢ καθάπερ ἄλλοι λέγουσι νύμφης Κυλλήνης, παῖς Λυκάων ἐγένετο, ὃς βασιλεύων Ἀρκάδων ἐκ πολλῶν γυναικῶν πεντήκοντα παῖδας ἐγέννησε· Μελαινέα 2 -- Θεσπρωτὸν Ἕλικα Νύκτιμον Πευκέτιον, Καύκωνα Μηκιστέα Ὁπλέα Μακαρέα Μάκεδνον, Ὅρον 3 -- Πόλιχον Ἀκόντην Εὐαίμονα Ἀγκύορα, Ἀρχεβάτην Καρτέρωνα Αἰγαίωνα Πάλλαντα Εὔμονα, Κάνηθον Πρόθοον Λίνον Κορέθοντα 4 -- Μαίναλον, Τηλεβόαν Φύσιον Φάσσον Φθῖον Λύκιον, Ἁλίφηρον Γενέτορα Βουκολίωνα Σωκλέα Φινέα, Εὐμήτην Ἁρπαλέα Πορθέα Πλάτωνα Αἵμονα, Κύναιθον Λέοντα Ἁρπάλυκον Ἡραιέα Τιτάναν, Μαντινέα 5 -- Κλείτορα Στύμφαλον Ὀρχομενόν οὗτοι πάντας ἀνθρώπους ὑπερέβαλλον 6 -- ὑπερηφανίᾳ καὶ ἀσεβείᾳ. Ζεὺς δὲ αὐτῶν βουλόμενος τὴν ἀσέβειαν πειρᾶσαι εἰκασθεὶς ἀνδρὶ χερνήτῃ παραγίνεται. οἱ δὲ αὐτὸν ἐπὶ ξένια 1 -- καλέσαντες, σφάξαντες ἕνα τῶν ἐπιχωρίων παῖδα, τοῖς ἱεροῖς τὰ τούτου σπλάγχνα συναναμίξαντες παρέθεσαν, συμβουλεύσαντος τοῦ πρεσβυτέρου ἀδελφοῦ Μαινάλου. Ζεὺς δὲ μυσαχθεὶς 2 -- τὴν μὲν τράπεζαν ἀνέτρεψεν, ἔνθα νῦν Τραπεζοῦς καλεῖται ὁ τόπος, Λυκάονα δὲ καὶ τοὺς τούτου παῖδας ἐκεραύνωσε, χωρὶς τοῦ νεωτάτου Νυκτίμου· φθάσασα 1 -- γὰρ ἡ Γῆ καὶ τῆς δεξιᾶς τοῦ Διὸς ἐφαψαμένη τὴν ὀργὴν κατέπαυσε.
12. New Testament, Acts, 10.26, 13.14-13.52 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.26. But Peter raised him up, saying, "Stand up! I myself am also a man. 13.14. But they, passing through from Perga, came to Antioch of Pisidia. They went into the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and sat down. 13.15. After the reading of the law and the prophets, the rulers of the synagogue sent to them, saying, "Brothers, if you have any word of exhortation for the people, speak. 13.16. Paul stood up, and beckoning with his hand said, "Men of Israel, and you who fear God, listen. 13.17. The God of this people Israel chose our fathers, and exalted the people when they stayed as aliens in the land of Egypt , and with an uplifted arm, he led them out of it. 13.18. For about the time of forty years he put up with them in the wilderness. 13.19. When he had destroyed seven nations in the land of Canaan, he gave them their land for an inheritance, for about four hundred fifty years. 13.20. After these things he gave them judges until Samuel the prophet. 13.21. Afterward they asked for a king, and God gave to them Saul the son of Kish, a man of the tribe of Benjamin, for forty years. 13.22. When he had removed him, he raised up David to be their king, to whom he also testified, 'I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after my heart, who will do all my will.' 13.23. From this man's seed, God has brought salvation to Israel according to his promise 13.24. before his coming, when John had first preached the baptism of repentance to all the people of Israel. 13.25. As John was fulfilling his course, he said, 'What do you suppose that I am? I am not he. But behold, one comes after me the sandals of whose feet I am not worthy to untie.' 13.26. Brothers, children of the stock of Abraham, and those among you who fear God, the word of this salvation is sent out to you. 13.27. For those who dwell in Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they didn't know him, nor the voices of the prophets which are read every Sabbath, fulfilled them by condemning him. 13.28. Though they found no cause for death, they still asked Pilate to have him killed. 13.29. When they had fulfilled all things that were written about him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a tomb. 13.30. But God raised him from the dead 13.31. and he was seen for many days by those who came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses to the people. 13.32. We bring you good news of the promise made to the fathers 13.33. that God has fulfilled the same to us, their children, in that he raised up Jesus. As it is also written in the second psalm, 'You are my Son. Today I have become your father.' 13.34. Concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he has spoken thus: 'I will give you the holy and sure blessings of David.' 13.35. Therefore he says also in another psalm, 'You will not allow your Holy One to see decay.' 13.36. For David, after he had in his own generation served the counsel of God, fell asleep, and was laid with his fathers, and saw decay. 13.37. But he whom God raised up saw no decay. 13.38. Be it known to you therefore, brothers, that through this man is proclaimed to you remission of sins 13.39. and by him everyone who believes is justified from all things, from which you could not be justified by the law of Moses. 13.40. Beware therefore, lest that come on you which is spoken in the prophets: 13.41. 'Behold, you scoffers, and wonder, and perish; For I work a work in your days, A work which you will in no way believe, if one declares it to you.' 13.42. So when the Jews went out of the synagogue, the Gentiles begged that these words might be preached to them the next Sabbath. 13.43. Now when the synagogue broke up, many of the Jews and of the devout proselytes followed Paul and Barnabas; who, speaking to them, urged them to continue in the grace of God. 13.44. The next Sabbath almost the whole city was gathered together to hear the word of God. 13.45. But when the Jews saw the multitudes, they were filled with jealousy, and contradicted the things which were spoken by Paul, and blasphemed. 13.46. Paul and Barnabas spoke out boldly, and said, "It was necessary that God's word should be spoken to you first. Since indeed you thrust it from you, and judge yourselves unworthy of eternal life, behold, we turn to the Gentiles. 13.47. For so has the Lord commanded us, saying, 'I have set you as a light of the Gentiles, That you should be for salvation to the uttermost parts of the earth.' 13.48. As the Gentiles heard this, they were glad, and glorified the word of God. As many as were appointed to eternal life believed. 13.49. The Lord's word was spread abroad throughout all the region. 13.50. But the Jews urged on the devout women of honorable estate, and the chief men of the city, and stirred up a persecution against Paul and Barnabas, and threw them out of their borders. 13.51. But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came to Iconium. 13.52. The disciples were filled with joy with the Holy Spirit.
13. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, 3.27-3.30, 3.29.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Statius, Thebais, 1.239-1.247 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Domitianus, 10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Tacitus, Agricola, 2.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Censorinus, De Die Natali, 18.11 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Anon., 4 Ezra, 12, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of the apostles Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
aetiology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
anonymous theban Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
anthropomorphism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
apocalypse, genre Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
apollo Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
arendt Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
aristotle Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
astrologers Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
athene Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
augustus Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
bacchus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
baucis and philemon Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
berossus Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
birds Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
body, human, in antiquity, and identity Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 89
callimachus, aetia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
callimachus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
cecrops Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
cerambus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 52
change Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 260
cicero Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
circe Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 89
clothes, ripping Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
creon, and /as eteocles Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
decline, historical Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
deucalion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
didactic, function Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
dis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
domitian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
empedocles Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
eteocles, and polynices Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
eteocles, theb. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and anger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and envy ( invidia ) Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and hatred Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and tyranny Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, tyrants psychology Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fire Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 260
floods, in horace Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 51
floods, in ovid Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 51, 52
four- (or five‐) kingdom paradigm Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
golden age Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
great year Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
greeks (ancient) Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
hesiod Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
homer Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 89
hylas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
identity, body and Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 89
irony Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
judgement, final Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
jupiter, and the flood Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 52
jupiter, met. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
jupiter, theb. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
jupiter Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
latona Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
linus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
literary sources for the humanbody in antiquity, latin Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 89
lucretius, plague at athens Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
lucretius Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
lycaon-zeus legend Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
lycaon Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 51; Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 89; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
lystra, anatolian village Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
medea Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 200
metakosmesis Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 51, 52
metamorphosis Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 260; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
omophagia Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 200
ovid' Montserrat, Changing Bodies, Changing Meanings: Studies on the Human Body in Antiquity (1998) 89
ovid, adynata Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
ovid Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
pagan / pagans / pagan religion Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
pastoral Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
periodisation of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
philemon and baucis Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
philomela Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
philosophy, greek, in rome Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 51, 52
procne Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
prometheus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 52
revelation Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
ritual Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 260
seneca, cataclysm in natural questions Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
seneca, criticism of ovid Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
seneca, demythologizes ovid Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
seneca Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
sibyl, jewish and christian uses of Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
sibylline oracles Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
silenus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
stoic / stoicism Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
suetonius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
suffering, as sign of the end Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
tacitus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
teleology\n, view of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
tereus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
thought, hermes Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
tisiphone Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
transformation Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 260
triton Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 52
tyrant, flavian epic Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
universal conflagration, stoic doctrine of Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
varus (p.alfenus) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
vergil, noric plague Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 158
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
weather signs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 130
wisdom Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 116
wordelman, a., lystra literary constructions Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
zeus, jupiter Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616
zeus, lystra Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 616