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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8590
Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.185-1.205


Nam quamquam ferus hostis erat, tamen illud ab unoand soon destructive iron and harmful gold


corpore et ex una pendebat origine bellum.were brought to light; and War, which uses both


Nunc mihi, qua totum Nereus circumsonat orbemcame forth and shook with sanguinary grip


perdendum est mortale genus: per flumina iurohis clashing arms. Rapacity broke forth—


infera, sub terras Stygio labentia luco!the guest was not protected from his host


cuncta prius temptata: sed inmedicabile corpusthe father in law from his own son in law;


ense recidendum est, ne pars sincera trahatur.even brothers seldom could abide in peace.


Sunt mihi semidei, sunt rustica numina, nymphaeThe husband threatened to destroy his wife


faunique satyrique et monticolae silvani:and she her husband: horrid step dames mixed


quos quoniam caeli nondum dignamur honorethe deadly henbane: eager sons inquired


quas dedimus certe terras habitare sinamus.their fathers, ages. Piety was slain:


An satis, o superi, tutos fore creditis illosand last of all the virgin deity


cum mihi, qui fulmen, qui vos habeoque regoqueAstraea vanished from the blood-stained earth.


struxerit insidias notus feritate Lycaon?”And lest ethereal heights should long remain


Confremuere omnes studiisque ardentibus ausumless troubled than the earth, the throne of Heaven


talia deposcunt. Sic, cum manus inpia saevitwas threatened by the Giants; and they piled


sanguine Caesareo Romanum exstinguere nomenmountain on mountain to the lofty stars.


attonitum tanto subitae terrore ruinaeBut Jove, omnipotent, shot thunderbolt


humanum genus est totusque perhorruit orbis:through Mount Olympus , and he overturned


nec tibi grata minus pietas, Auguste, tuorum estfrom Ossa huge, enormous Pelion.


quam fuit illa Iovi. Qui postquam voce manuqueAnd while these dreadful bodies lay overwhelmed


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 107-201, 106 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

106. (The lid already stopped her, by the will
2. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.89-1.150, 1.166-1.180, 1.186-1.252, 1.262-1.312, 1.324-1.339, 1.452-1.465, 1.477-1.479, 1.515-1.518, 1.546-1.547, 1.557-1.567, 15.870-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Tristia, 2.445-2.446, 3.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31-2.32, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.671-8.731, 10.1-10.117 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true. 10.1. Meanwhile Olympus, seat of sovereign sway 10.2. threw wide its portals, and in conclave fair 10.3. the Sire of gods and King of all mankind 10.4. ummoned th' immortals to his starry court 10.5. whence, high-enthroned, the spreading earth he views— 10.6. and Teucria's camp and Latium 's fierce array. 10.7. Beneath the double-gated dome the gods 10.8. were sitting; Jove himself the silence broke: 10.9. “O people of Olympus, wherefore change 10.10. your purpose and decree, with partial minds 10.11. in mighty strife contending? I refused 10.12. uch clash of war 'twixt Italy and Troy . 10.13. Whence this forbidden feud? What fears 10.14. educed to battles and injurious arms 10.15. either this folk or that? Th' appointed hour 10.16. for war shall be hereafter—speed it not!— 10.17. When cruel Carthage to the towers of Rome 10.18. hall bring vast ruin, streaming fiercely down 10.19. the opened Alp. Then hate with hate shall vie 10.20. and havoc have no bound. Till then, give o'er 10.22. Thus briefly, Jove. But golden Venus made 10.23. less brief reply. “O Father, who dost hold 10.24. o'er Man and all things an immortal sway! 10.25. of what high throne may gods the aid implore 10.26. ave thine? Behold of yonder Rutuli 10.27. th' insulting scorn! Among them Turnus moves 10.28. in chariot proud, and boasts triumphant war 10.29. in mighty words. Nor do their walls defend 10.30. my Teucrians now. But in their very gates 10.31. and on their mounded ramparts, in close fight 10.32. they breast their foes and fill the moats with blood. 10.33. Aeneas knows not, and is far away. 10.34. Will ne'er the siege have done? A second time 10.35. above Troy 's rising walls the foe impends; 10.36. another host is gathered, and once more 10.37. from his Aetolian Arpi wrathful speeds 10.38. a Diomed. I doubt not that for me 10.39. wounds are preparing. Yea, thy daughter dear 10.40. awaits a mortal sword! If by thy will 10.41. unblest and unapproved the Trojans came 10.42. to Italy, for such rebellious crime 10.43. give them their due, nor lend them succor, thou 10.44. with thy strong hand! But if they have obeyed 10.45. unnumbered oracles from gods above 10.46. and sacred shades below, who now has power 10.47. to thwart thy bidding, or to weave anew 10.48. the web of Fate? Why speak of ships consumed 10.49. along my hallowed Erycinian shore? 10.50. Or of the Lord of Storms, whose furious blasts 10.51. were summoned from Aeolia ? Why tell 10.52. of Iris sped from heaven? Now she moves 10.53. the region of the shades (one kingdom yet 10.54. from her attempt secure) and thence lets loose 10.55. Alecto on the world above, who strides 10.56. in frenzied wrath along th' Italian hills. 10.57. No more my heart now cherishes its hope 10.58. of domination, though in happier days 10.59. uch was thy promise. Let the victory fall 10.60. to victors of thy choice! If nowhere lies 10.61. the land thy cruel Queen would deign accord 10.62. unto the Teucrian people,—O my sire 10.63. I pray thee by yon smouldering wreck of Troy 10.64. to let Ascanius from the clash of arms 10.65. escape unscathed. Let my own offspring live! 10.66. Yea, let Aeneas, tossed on seas unknown 10.67. find some chance way; let my right hand avail 10.68. to shelter him and from this fatal war 10.69. in safety bring. For Amathus is mine 10.70. mine are Cythera and the Paphian hills 10.71. and temples in Idalium . Let him drop 10.72. the sword, and there live out inglorious days. 10.73. By thy decree let Carthage overwhelm 10.74. Ausonia's power; nor let defence be found 10.75. to stay the Tyrian arms! What profits it 10.76. that he escaped the wasting plague of war 10.77. and fled Argolic fires? or that he knew 10.78. o many perils of wide wilderness 10.79. and waters rude? The Teucrians seek in vain 10.80. new-born Troy in Latium . Better far 10.81. crouched on their country's ashes to abide 10.82. and keep that spot of earth where once was Troy ! 10.83. Give back, O Father, I implore thee, give 10.84. Xanthus and Simois back! Let Teucer's sons 10.86. Then sovereign Juno, flushed with solemn scorn 10.87. made answer. “Dost thou bid me here profane 10.88. the silence of my heart, and gossip forth 10.89. of secret griefs? What will of god or man 10.90. impelled Aeneas on his path of war 10.91. or made him foeman of the Latin King? 10.92. Fate brought him to Italia ? Be it so! 10.93. Cassandra's frenzy he obeyed. What voice — 10.94. ay, was it mine?—urged him to quit his camp 10.95. risk life in storms, or trust his war, his walls 10.96. to a boy-captain, or stir up to strife 10.97. Etruria's faithful, unoffending sons? 10.98. What god, what pitiless behest of mine 10.99. impelled him to such harm? Who traces here 10.100. the hand of Juno, or of Iris sped 10.101. from heaven? Is it an ignoble stroke 10.102. that Italy around the new-born Troy 10.103. makes circling fire, and Turnus plants his heel 10.104. on his hereditary earth, the son 10.105. of old Pilumnus and the nymph divine 10.106. Venilia? For what offence would Troy 10.107. bring sword and fire on Latium, or enslave 10.108. lands of an alien name, and bear away 10.109. plunder and spoil? Why seek they marriages 10.110. and snatch from arms of love the plighted maids? 10.111. An olive-branch is in their hands; their ships 10.112. make menace of grim steel. Thy power one day 10.113. ravished Aeneas from his Argive foes 10.114. and gave them shape of cloud and fleeting air 10.115. to strike at for a man. Thou hast transformed 10.116. his ships to daughters of the sea. What wrong 10.117. if I, not less, have lent the Rutuli
7. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
8. Statius, Thebais, 1.239-1.247 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Domitianus, 10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Tacitus, Agricola, 2.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Tacitus, Annals, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1.  Rome at the outset was a city state under the government of kings: liberty and the consulate were institutions of Lucius Brutus. Dictatorships were always a temporary expedient: the decemviral office was dead within two years, nor was the consular authority of the military tribunes long-lived. Neither Cinna nor Sulla created a lasting despotism: Pompey and Crassus quickly forfeited their power to Caesar, and Lepidus and Antony their swords to Augustus, who, under the style of "Prince," gathered beneath his empire a world outworn by civil broils. But, while the glories and disasters of the old Roman commonwealth have been chronicled by famous pens, and intellects of distinction were not lacking to tell the tale of the Augustan age, until the rising tide of sycophancy deterred them, the histories of Tiberius and Caligula, of Claudius and Nero, were falsified through cowardice while they flourished, and composed, when they fell, under the influence of still rankling hatreds. Hence my design, to treat a small part (the concluding one) of Augustus' reign, then the principate of Tiberius and its sequel, without anger and without partiality, from the motives of which I stand sufficiently removed.
12. Anon., 4 Ezra, 12, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
anonymous theban Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
apocalypse, genre Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
apollo Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
arendt Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
augustus/octavian, conspiracies against Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124, 204
augustus/octavian, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124
augustus Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
autocracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
autonomy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
bacchus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
books Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
callimachus, aetia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
concordia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
consensus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
consent Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124
creon, and /as eteocles Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
decline, historical Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
deucalion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
didactic, function Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
dis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
domitian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
elites Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 204
eteocles, and polynices Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
eteocles, theb. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and anger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and envy ( invidia ) Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and hatred Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, and tyranny Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
fear, tyrants psychology Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
four- (or five‐) kingdom paradigm Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
free speech Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
hermeneutic, guides Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
hesiod Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
hylas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
indeterminacy, hindsight Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
indeterminacy, of suspicion Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
irony Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
judgement, final Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
judgment Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
jupiter, met. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
jupiter, theb. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
laurel Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124
linus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
medea Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 200
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
omophagia Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 200
paratexts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
pastoral Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
periodisation of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
philomela Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 204
power, disciplinary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
power, of the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
procne Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
propertius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
senate Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 204
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124
silence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124
silenus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
suetonius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
suffering, as sign of the end Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
tacitus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123
teleology\n, view of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 109
tereus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 123, 124
tisiphone Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
tyrant, flavian epic Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 134
varus (p.alfenus) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 5
voice' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 124