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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 5.7-5.8


dicite, quae fontes Aganippidos HippocrenesYou who haunt the founts of Aganippian Hippocrene


grata Medusaei signa tenetis equi.Those beloved prints of the Medusaean horse, explain!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 27-28, 26 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

26. of Helicon, and in those early day
2. Euripides, Helen, 1346 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1346. χαλκοῦ δ' αὐδὰν χθονίαν
3. Callimachus, Aetia, 1.25, 2.1 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Amores, 1.1, 3.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 2.2.115-2.2.116 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 1.63-1.288, 2.21, 4.19-4.60, 4.82-4.84, 4.94, 4.123-4.124, 4.584, 5.1-5.6, 5.8-5.110, 6.1-6.2, 6.26, 6.88, 6.91-6.92, 6.96 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.63. See how Janus appears first in my song 1.64. To announce a happy year for you, Germanicus. 1.67. Be favourable to the leaders, whose labours win 1.69. Be favourable to the senate and Roman people 1.71. A prosperous day dawns: favour our thoughts and speech! 1.72. Let auspicious words be said on this auspicious day. 1.73. Let our ears be free of lawsuits then, and banish 1.74. Mad disputes now: you, malicious tongues, cease wagging! 1.75. See how the air shines with fragrant fire 1.76. And Cilician grains crackle on lit hearths! 1.77. The flame beats brightly on the temple’s gold 1.78. And spreads a flickering light on the shrine’s roof. 1.79. Spotless garments make their way to Tarpeian Heights 1.80. And the crowd wear the colours of the festival: 1.81. Now the new rods and axes lead, new purple glows 1.82. And the distinctive ivory chair feels fresh weight. 1.83. Heifers that grazed the grass on Faliscan plains 1.84. Unbroken to the yoke, bow their necks to the axe. 1.85. When Jupiter watches the whole world from his hill 1.86. Everything that he sees belongs to Rome. 1.87. Hail, day of joy, and return forever, happier still 1.88. Worthy to be cherished by a race that rules the world. 1.102. Over the days, and remember my speech. 1.103. The ancients called me Chaos (since I am of the first world): 1.105. The clear air, and the three other elements 1.106. Fire, water, earth, were heaped together as one. 1.107. When, through the discord of its components 1.108. The mass dissolved, and scattered to new regions 1.109. Flame found the heights: air took a lower place 1.110. While earth and sea sank to the furthest depth. 1.111. Then I, who was a shapeless mass, a ball 1.112. Took on the appearance, and noble limbs of a god. 1.113. Even now, a small sign of my once confused state 1.114. My front and back appear just the same. 1.117. Whatever you see: sky, sea, clouds, earth 1.118. All things are begun and ended by my hand. 1.119. Care of the vast world is in my hands alone 1.120. And mine the goverce of the turning pole. 1.121. When I choose to send Peace, from tranquil houses 1.122. Freely she walks the roads, and ceaselessly: 1.123. The whole world would drown in bloodstained slaughter 1.124. If rigid barriers failed to hold war in check. 1.129. With salt: on his sacrificial lips I’m Patulcius 1.130. And then again I’m called Clusius. 1.135. Every doorway has two sides, this way and that 1.136. One facing the crowds, and the other the Lares: 1.141. You see Hecate’s faces turned in three directions 1.171. Next I said: ‘Why, while I placate other gods, Janus 1.172. Do I bring the wine and incense first to you?’ 1.173. He replied: ‘So that through me, who guard the threshold 1.174. You can have access to whichever god you please.’ 1.181. When the temples and ears of the gods are open 1.209. But ever since Fortune, here, has raised her head 1.210. And Rome has brushed the heavens with her brow 1.223. We too delight in golden temples, however much 1.224. We approve the antique: such splendour suits a god. 1.225. We praise the past, but experience our own times: 1.226. Yet both are ways worthy of being cultivated.’ 1.229. ‘Indeed I’ve learned much: but why is there a ship’s figure 1.230. On one side of the copper as, a twin shape on the other?’ 1.231. ‘You might have recognised me in the double-image’ 1.232. He said, ‘if length of days had not worn the coin away. 1.233. The reason for the ship is that the god of the sickle 1.234. Wandering the globe, by ship, reached the Tuscan river. 1.235. I remember how Saturn was welcomed in this land: 1.236. Driven by Jupiter from the celestial regions. 1.243. Here, where Rome is now, uncut forest thrived 1.244. And all this was pasture for scattered cattle. 1.249. Justice had not yet fled from human sin 1.250. (She was the last deity to leave the earth) 1.251. Shame without force, instead of fear, ruled the people 1.260. He at once retold the warlike acts of Oebalian Tatius 1.261. And how the treacherous keeper, Tarpeia, bribed with bracelets 1.262. Led the silent Sabines to the heights of the citadel. 1.277. ‘But why hide in peace, and open your gates in war?’ 1.278. He swiftly gave me the answer that I sought: 1.279. ‘My unbarred gate stands open wide, so that when 1.280. The people go to war the return path’s open too.’ 1.281. I bar it in peacetime so peace cannot depart: 1.282. And by Caesar’s will I shall be long closed.’ 1.283. He spoke, and raising his eyes that looked both ways 1.284. He surveyed whatever existed in the whole world. 1.285. There was peace, and already a cause of triumph, Germanicus 1.286. The Rhine had yielded her waters up in submission to you. 1.287. Janus, make peace and the agents of peace eternal 1.288. And grant the author may never abandon his work. 2.21. The high priests ask the King and the Flamen 4.23. When Romulus established the length of the year 4.24. He recognised this, and commemorated your sires: 4.25. And as he granted first place among months to fierce Mars 4.26. Being the immediate cause of his own existence 4.27. So he granted the second month to Venus 4.28. Tracing his descent from her through many generations: 4.29. Searching for the roots of his race, unwinding the roll 4.30. of the centuries, he came at last to his divine kin. 4.31. He couldn’t be ignorant that Electra daughter of Atla 4.32. Bore Dardanus, that Electra had slept with Jove. 4.33. From Dardanus came Ericthonius, and from himTros: 4.34. He in turn produced Assaracus, and Assaracus Capys. 4.35. Next was Anchises, with whom Venu 4.36. Didn’t disdain to share the name of parent. 4.37. From them came Aeneas, whose piety was seen, carrying 4.38. Holy things, and a father as holy, on his shoulders, through the fire. 4.39. Now at last we come to the fortunate name of Iulus 4.40. Through whom the Julian house claims Teucrian ancestors. 4.41. Postumus was his, called Silvius among the Latin 4.42. Race, being born in the depth of the woods. 4.43. He was your father, Latinus. Alba followed Latinus: 4.44. Epytus was next to take your titles Alba. 4.45. Epytus gave his son Capys a Trojan name 4.46. And the same was your grandfather Calpetus. 4.47. When Tiberinus ruled his father’s kingdom after him 4.48. It’s said he drowned in a deep pool of the Tuscan river. 4.49. But before that he saw the birth of a son Agrippa 4.50. And a grandson Remulus, who was struck by lightning. 4.51. Aventinus followed them, from whom the place and the hill 4.52. Took their name. After him the realm passed to Proca. 4.53. He was succeeded by Numitor, brother to harsh Amulius. 4.54. Ilia and Lausus were then the children of Numitor. 4.55. Lausus fell to his uncle’s sword: Ilia pleased Mars 4.56. And bore you Quirinus, and your brother Remus. 4.57. You always claimed your parents were Mars and Venus 4.58. And deserved to be believed when you said so: 4.59. And you granted successive months to your race’s gods 4.60. So your descendants might not be in ignorance of the truth. 4.94. And maintains all beings from her source. 4.123. And she was called the bride of Assaracus’s son 4.124. So that mighty Caesar would have Julian ancestors. 4.584. Is married to Jupiter’s brother, and rules the third realm.’ 5.1. You ask where I think the name of May comes from? 5.2. Its origin’s not totally clear to me. 5.3. As a traveller stands unsure which way to go 5.4. Seeing the paths fan out in all directions 5.5. So I’m not sure which to accept, since it’s possible 5.6. To give different reasons: plenty itself confuses. 5.8. Those beloved prints of the Medusaean horse, explain! 5.9. The goddesses are in conflict. Polyhymnia begins 5.10. While the others silently consider her speech. 5.11. ‘After the first Chaos, as soon as the three primary form 5.12. Were given to the world, all things were newly re-configured: 5.13. Earth sank under its own weight, and drew down the seas 5.14. But lightness lifted the sky to the highest regions: 5.15. And the sun and stars, not held back by their weight 5.16. And you, you horses of the moon, sprang high. 5.17. But Earth for a long time wouldn’t yield to Sky 5.18. Nor the other lights to the Sun: honours were equal. 5.19. One of the common crowd of gods, would often dare 5.20. To sit on the throne that you, Saturn, owned 5.21. None of the new gods took Ocean’s side 5.22. And Themis was relegated to the lowest place 5.23. Until Honour, and proper Reverence, she 5.24. of the calm look, were united in a lawful bed. 5.25. From them Majesty was born, she considers them 5.26. Her parents, she who was noble from her day of birth. 5.27. She took her seat, at once, high in the midst of Olympus 5.28. Conspicuous, golden, in her purple folds. 5.29. Modesty and Fear sat with her: you could see 5.30. All the gods modelling their expression on hers. 5.31. At once, respect for honour entered their minds: 5.32. The worthy had their reward, none thought of self. 5.33. This state of things lasted for years in heaven 5.34. Till the elder god was banished by fate from the citadel. 5.35. Earth bore the Giants, a fierce brood of savage monsters 5.36. Who dared to venture against Jupiter’s halls: 5.37. She gave them a thousands hands, serpents for legs 5.38. And said: “Take up arms against the mighty gods.” 5.39. They set to piling mountains to the highest stars 5.40. And to troubling mighty Jupiter with war: 5.41. He hurled lightning bolts from the heavenly citadel 5.42. And overturned the weighty mass on its creators. 5.43. These divine weapons protected Majesty well 5.44. She survived, and has been worshipped ever since: 5.45. So she attends on Jove, Jove’s truest guardian 5.46. And allows him to hold the sceptre without force. 5.47. She came to earth as well: Romulus and Numa 5.48. Both worshipped her, and so did others in later ages. 5.49. She maintains fathers and mothers in due honour 5.50. She keeps company with virgins and young boys 5.51. She burnishes the lictor’s rods, axes, and ivory chair 5.52. She rides high in triumph behind the garlanded horses.’ 5.53. Polyhymnia finished speaking: Clio, and Thalia 5.54. Mistress of the curved lyre, approved her words. 5.55. Urania continued: all the rest were silent 5.56. And hers was the only voice that could be heard. 5.57. ‘Once great reverence was shown to white hair 5.58. And wrinkled age was valued at its true worth. 5.59. The young waged work of war, and spirited battle 5.60. Holding to their posts for the sake of the gods: 5.61. Age, inferior in strength, and unfit for arms 5.62. often did the country a service by its counsel. 5.63. The Senate was only open to men of mature age 5.64. And Senators bear a name meaning ripe in years. 5.65. The elders made laws for the people, and specific 5.66. Rules governed the age when office might be sought: 5.67. Old men walked with the young, without their indignation 5.68. And on the inside, if they only had one companion. 5.69. Who dared then to talk shamefully in an older man’ 5.70. Presence? Old age granted rights of censorship. 5.71. Romulus knew this, and chose the City Father 5.72. From select spirits: making them the rulers of the City. 5.73. So I deduce that the elders (maiores) gave their own title 5.74. To the month of May: and looked after their own interests. 5.75. Numitor too may have said: “Romulus, grant this month 5.76. To the old men” and his grandson may have yielded. 5.77. The following month, June, named for young men (iuvenes) 5.78. Gives no slight proof of the honour intended.’ 5.79. Then Calliope herself, first of that choir, her hair 5.80. Unkempt and wreathed with ivy, began to speak: 5.81. ‘Tethys, the Titaness, was married long ago to Ocean 5.82. He who encircles the outspread earth with flowing water. 5.83. The story is that their daughter Pleione was united 5.84. To sky-bearing Atlas, and bore him the Pleiades. 5.85. Among them, Maia’s said to have surpassed her sister 5.86. In beauty, and to have slept with mighty Jove. 5.87. She bore Mercury, who cuts the air on winged feet 5.88. On the cypress-clothed ridge of Mount Cyllene. 5.89. The Arcadians, and swift Ladon, and vast Maenalus 5.90. A land thought older than the moon, rightly worship him. 5.91. Evander, in exile from Arcadia, came to the Latin fields 5.92. And brought his gods with him, aboard ship. 5.93. Where Rome, the capital of the world, now stand 5.94. There were trees, grass, a few sheep, the odd cottage. 5.95. When they arrived, his prophetic mother said: 5.96. “Halt here! This rural spot will be the place of Empire.” 5.97. The Arcadian hero obeyed his mother, the prophetess 5.98. And stayed, though a stranger in a foreign land. 5.99. He taught the people many rites, but, above all, those 5.100. of twin-horned Faunus, and Mercury the wing-footed god. 5.101. Faunus half-goat, you’re worshipped by the girded Luperci 5.102. When their strips of hide purify the crowded streets. 5.103. But you, Mercury, patron of thieves, inventor 5.104. of the curved lyre, gave your mother’s name to this month. 5.105. Nor was this your first act of piety: you’re thought 5.106. To have given the lyre seven strings, the Pleiads’ number.’ 5.107. Calliope too ended: and her sisters voiced their praise. 5.108. And so? All three were equally convincing. 5.109. May the Muses’ favour attend me equally 5.110. And let me never praise one more than the rest.
7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.445 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Tristia, 1.1.72, 1.1.81-1.1.82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexandrian poetry Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
amores (ovid) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
anxiety, artistic Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
ars amatoria (ovid) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
augustus, deification Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
augustus, jupiter linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
book per month structure of fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 102
calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
callimachus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
calliope, song of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
contests, territory as motive for Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
cupid Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
debates Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
dionysus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
divinity (of a mortal) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
doubt Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
emathides, punishment of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
epiphany, visual or sonic manifestation of the gods Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
epistula ex ponto (ovid) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
exile (relegation), as context for creation of works Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
exile poetry of ovid Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
fasti (ovid), calendrical tradition and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
helicon Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
hesiod Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96; Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
hubris, artistic arrogance Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
humour Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
inspiration Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
io Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
jupiter (zeus), augustus linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
jupiter (zeus), proserpinas rape and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
muse, muses Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
muses, imperialism linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
muses, in hesiod Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
muses, ovids characterizations of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
numa Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
patrons of the arts Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
phaethon Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
pierides Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72, 141
playfulness Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
poets, muses as patrons of poets Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
proserpina (persephone), marriage of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
proserpina (persephone), rape of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72, 141
proserpina by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 141
relegatio Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
revisions of the fasti Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 96
ship motif as structuring device' Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 102
silence, as punishment Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
venus, rape of proserpina as act of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72