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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 5.347-5.368


scaena levis decet hanc: non est, mihi credite, non estBacchus loves flowers: you can see he delight


illa coturnatas inter habenda deas.In a crown, from Ariadne’s chaplet of stars.


turba quidem cur hos celebret meretricia ludosThe comic stage suits her: she’s never: believe me


non ex difficili causa petita subest.Never been counted among the tragic goddesses.


non est de tetricis, non est de magna professisThe reason the crowd of whores celebrate these game


volt sua plebeio sacra patere choroIs not a difficult one for us to discover.


et monet aetatis specie, dum floreat, uti;The goddess isn’t gloomy, she’s not high-flown


contemni spinam, cum cecidere rosae.She wants her rites to be open to the common man


cur tamen, ut dantur vestes Cerialibus albaeAnd warns us to use life’s beauty while it’s in bloom:


sic haec est cultu versicolore decens?The thorn is spurned when the rose has fallen.


an quia maturis albescit messis aristisWhy is it, when white robes are handed out for Ceres


et color et species floribus omnis inest?Flora’s neatly dressed in a host of colours?


annuit, et motis flores cecidere capillisIs it because the harvest’s ripe when the ears whiten


accidere in mensas ut rosa missa soletBut flowers are of every colour and splendour?


lumina restabant, quorum me causa latebatShe nods, and flowers fall as her hair flows


cum sic errores abstulit illa meos:As roses fall when they’re scattered on a table.


‘vel quia purpureis collucent floribus agriThere’s still the lights, whose reason escaped me


lumina sunt nostros visa decere dies;Till the goddess dispelled my ignorance like this:


vel quia nec flos est hebeti nec flamma colore‘Lights are thought to be fitting for my day


atque oculos in se splendor uterque trahit;Because the fields glow with crimson flowers


vel quia deliciis nocturna licentia nostrisOr because flowers and flames aren’t dull in colour


convenit, a vero tertia causa venit.’And the splendour of them both attracts the eye:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 2.1.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Ovid, Fasti, 3.697-3.702, 4.945-4.947, 4.949, 5.183-5.346, 5.348-5.378, 6.267, 6.320, 6.460 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.697. Our leader, when Vesta spoke from her pure hearth: 3.698. Don’t hesitate to recall them: he was my priest 3.699. And those sacrilegious hands sought me with their blades. 3.700. I snatched him away, and left a naked semblance: 3.701. What died by the steel, was Caesar’s shadow.’ 3.702. Raised to the heavens he found Jupiter’s halls 4.945. of flowers: and the stage has freer license for mirth. 4.949. At her kinsman’s threshold: so the Senators justly decreed. 5.183. But the sisters’ love was greater than either parent’s: 5.184. It won them the heavens: Hyas gave them his name. 5.185. ‘Mother of the flowers, approach, so we can honour you 5.186. With joyful games! Last month I deferred the task. 5.187. You begin in April, and pass into May’s span: 5.188. One claims you fleeing, the other as it comes on. 5.189. Since the boundaries of the months are yours 5.190. And defer to you, either’s fitting for your praise. 5.191. This is the month of the Circus’ Games, and the victors’ palm 5.192. The audience applauds: let my song accompany the Circus’ show. 5.193. Tell me, yourself, who you are. Men’s opinions err: 5.194. You’ll be the best informant regarding your own name.’ 5.195. So I spoke. So the goddess responded to my question 5.196. (While she spoke, her lips breathed out vernal roses): 5.197. ‘I, called Flora now, was Chloris: the first letter in Greek 5.198. of my name, became corrupted in the Latin language. 5.199. I was Chloris, a nymph of those happy fields 5.200. Where, as you’ve heard, fortunate men once lived. 5.201. It would be difficult to speak of my form, with modesty 5.202. But it brought my mother a god as son-in-law. 5.203. It was spring, I wandered: Zephyrus saw me: I left. 5.204. He followed me: I fled: he was the stronger 5.205. And Boreas had given his brother authority for rape 5.206. By daring to steal a prize from Erechtheus’ house. 5.207. Yet he made amends for his violence, by granting me 5.208. The name of bride, and I’ve nothing to complain of in bed. 5.209. I enjoy perpetual spring: the season’s always bright 5.210. The trees have leaves: the ground is always green. 5.211. I’ve a fruitful garden in the fields that were my dower 5.212. Fanned by the breeze, and watered by a flowing spring. 5.213. My husband stocked it with flowers, richly 5.214. And said: “Goddess, be mistress of the flowers.” 5.215. I often wished to tally the colours set there 5.216. But I couldn’t, there were too many to count. 5.217. As soon as the frosted dew is shaken from the leaves 5.218. And the varied foliage warmed by the sun’s rays 5.219. The Hours gather dressed in colourful clothes 5.220. And collect my gifts in slender baskets. 5.221. The Graces, straight away, draw near, and twine 5.222. Wreaths and garlands to bind their heavenly hair. 5.223. I was first to scatter fresh seeds among countless peoples 5.224. Till then the earth had been a single colour. 5.225. I was first to create the hyacinth, from Spartan blood 5.226. And a lament remains written on its petals. 5.227. You too, Narcissus, were known among the gardens 5.228. Unhappy that you were not other, and yet were other. 5.229. Why tell of Crocus, or Attis, or Adonis, son of Cinyras 5.230. From whose wounds beauty springs, through me? 5.231. Mars too, if you’re unaware, was brought to birth 5.232. By my arts: I pray unknowing Jupiter never knows it. 5.233. Sacred Juno grieved that Jupiter didn’t need 5.234. Her help, when motherless Minerva was born. 5.235. She went to Ocean to complain of her husband’s deeds: 5.236. Tired by the effort she rested at my door. 5.237. Catching sight of her, I said: “Why are you here, Saturnia?” 5.238. She explained what place she sought, and added 5.239. The reason. I consoled her with words of friendship: 5.240. She said: “My cares can’t be lightened by words. 5.241. If Jove can be a father without needing a wife 5.242. And contains both functions in a single person 5.243. Why should I despair of becoming a mother with no 5.244. Husband, and, chaste, give birth though untouched by man? 5.245. I’ll try all the drugs in the whole wide world 5.246. And search the seas, and shores of Tartarus.” 5.247. Her voice flew on: but my face showed doubt. 5.248. She said: “Nymph, it seems you have some power.” 5.249. Three times I wanted to promise help, three times my tongue 5.250. Was tied: mighty Jupiter’s anger was cause for fear. 5.251. She said: “Help me, I beg you, I’ll conceal the fact 5.252. And I’ll call on the powers of the Stygian flood as witness.” 5.253. “A flower, sent to me from the fields of Olenus 5.254. Will grant what you seek,” I replied, “unique, in all my garden. 5.255. He who gave it to me said: ‘Touch a barren heifer with this 5.256. And she’ll be a mother too.’ I did, and she was, instantly.” 5.257. With that, I nipped the clinging flower with my thumb 5.258. Touched Juno, and as I touched her breast she conceived. 5.259. Pregt now, she travelled to Thrace and the northern shore 5.260. of Propontis: her wish was granted, and Mars was born. 5.261. Mindful of his birth that he owed to me, he said: 5.262. “You too must have a place in Romulus’ City.” 5.263. Perhaps you think I only rule over tender garlands. 5.264. But my power also commands the farmers’ fields. 5.265. If the crops have flourished, the threshing-floor is full: 5.266. If the vines have flourished, there’ll be wine: 5.267. If the olive trees have flourished, the year will be bright 5.268. And the fruit will prosper at the proper time. 5.269. If the flower’s damaged, the beans and vetch die 5.270. And your imported lentils, Nile, die too. 5.271. Wine too, laboriously stored in the vast cellars 5.272. Froths, and clouds the wine jars’ surface with mist. 5.273. Honey’s my gift: I call the winged ones who make 5.274. Honey, to the violets, clover and pale thyme. 5.275. I carry out similar functions, when spirit 5.276. Run riot, and bodies themselves flourish.’ 5.277. I admired her, in silence, while she spoke. But she said: 5.278. ‘You may learn the answer to any of your questions.’ 5.279. ‘Goddess’, I replied: ‘What’s the origin of the games?’ 5.280. I’d barely ended when she answered me: 5.281. ‘Rich men owned cattle or tracts of land 5.282. Other means of wealth were then unknown 5.283. So the words ‘rich’ (locuples) from ‘landed’ (locus plenus) 5.284. And ‘money’ (pecunia) from ‘a flock’ (pecus), but already 5.285. Some had unlawful wealth: by custom, for ages 5.286. Public lands were grazed, without penalty. 5.287. Folk had no one to defend the common rights: 5.288. Till at last it was foolish to use private grazing. 5.289. This licence was pointed out to the Publicii 5.290. The plebeian aediles: earlier, men lacked confidence. 5.291. The case was tried before the people: the guilty fined: 5.292. And the champions praised for their public spirit. 5.293. A large part of the fine fell to me: and the victor 5.294. Instituted new games to loud applause. Part was allocated 5.295. To make a way up the Aventine’s slope, then steep rock: 5.296. Now it’s a serviceable track, called the Publician Road.’ 5.297. I believed the shows were annual. She contradicted it 5.298. And added further words to her previous speech: 5.299. ‘Honour touches me too: I delight in festivals and altars: 5.300. We’re a greedy crowd: we divine beings. 5.301. often, through their sins, men render the gods hostile 5.302. And, fawning, offer a sacrifice for their crimes: 5.303. often I’ve seen Jupiter, about to hurl his lightning 5.304. Draw back his hand, when offered a gift of incense. 5.305. But if we’re ignored, we avenge the injury 5.306. With heavy penalties, and our anger passes all bounds. 5.307. Remember Meleager, burnt up by distant flames: 5.308. The reason, because Diana’s altar lacked its fires. 5.309. Remember Agamemnon: the same goddess becalmed the fleet: 5.310. A virgin, yet still she twice avenged her neglected hearth. 5.311. Wretched Hippolytus, you wished you’d worshipped Venus 5.312. When your terrified horses were tearing you apart. 5.313. It would take too long to tell of neglect punished by loss. 5.314. I too was once neglected by the Roman Senate. 5.315. What to do, how to show my indignation? 5.316. What punishment to exact for the harm done me? 5.317. Gloomily, I gave up my office. I ceased to protect 5.318. The countryside, cared nothing for fruitful gardens: 5.319. The lilies drooped: you could see the violets fade 5.320. And the petals of the purple crocus languished. 5.321. often Zephyr said: ‘Don’t destroy your dowry.’ 5.322. But my dowry was worth nothing to me. 5.323. The olives were in blossom: wanton winds hurt them: 5.324. The wheat was ripening: hail blasted the crops: 5.325. The vines were promising: skies darkened from the south 5.326. And the leaves were brought down by sudden rain. 5.327. I didn’t wish it so: I’m not cruel in my anger 5.328. But I neglected to drive away these ills. 5.329. The Senate convened, and voted my godhead 5.330. An annual festival, if the year proved fruitful. 5.331. I accepted their vow. The consuls Laena 5.332. And Postumius celebrated these games of mine. 5.333. I was going to ask why there’s greater 5.334. Wantonness in her games, and freer jests 5.335. But it struck me that the goddess isn’t strict 5.336. And the gifts she brings are agents of delight. 5.337. The drinker’s brow’s wreathed with sewn-on garlands 5.338. And a shower of roses hides the shining table: 5.339. The drunken guest dances, hair bound with lime-tree bark 5.340. And unaware employs the wine’s purest art: 5.341. The drunken lover sings at beauty’s harsh threshold 5.342. And soft garlands crown his perfumed hair. 5.343. Nothing serious for those with garlanded brow 5.344. No running water’s drunk, when crowned with flowers: 5.345. While your stream, Achelous, was free of wine 5.346. No one as yet cared to pluck the rose. 5.348. In a crown, from Ariadne’s chaplet of stars. 5.349. The comic stage suits her: she’s never: believe me 5.350. Never been counted among the tragic goddesses. 5.351. The reason the crowd of whores celebrate these game 5.352. Is not a difficult one for us to discover. 5.353. The goddess isn’t gloomy, she’s not high-flown 5.354. She wants her rites to be open to the common man 5.355. And warns us to use life’s beauty while it’s in bloom: 5.356. The thorn is spurned when the rose has fallen. 5.357. Why is it, when white robes are handed out for Ceres 5.358. Flora’s neatly dressed in a host of colours? 5.359. Is it because the harvest’s ripe when the ears whiten 5.360. But flowers are of every colour and splendour? 5.361. She nods, and flowers fall as her hair flows 5.362. As roses fall when they’re scattered on a table. 5.363. There’s still the lights, whose reason escaped me 5.364. Till the goddess dispelled my ignorance like this: 5.365. ‘Lights are thought to be fitting for my day 5.366. Because the fields glow with crimson flowers 5.367. Or because flowers and flames aren’t dull in colour 5.368. And the splendour of them both attracts the eye: 5.369. Or because the licence of night suits my delights 5.370. And this third reason’s nearest to the truth.’ 5.371. ‘There’s one little thing besides, for me to ask 5.372. If you’ll allow,’ I said: and she said: ‘It’s allowed.’ 5.373. ‘Why then are gentle deer and shy hare 5.374. Caught in your nets, not Libyan lionesses?’ 5.375. She replied that gardens not woodlands were her care 5.376. And fields where no wild creatures were allowed. 5.377. All was ended: and she vanished into thin air: yet 5.378. Her fragrance lingered: you’d have known it was a goddess. 6.267. Vesta’s identified with Earth: in them both’s unsleeping fire: 6.320. It’s a brief tale but it’s a merry one. 6.460. Have violated: since divine Earth and Vesta are one.
3. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31 (1st cent. BCE

4. Martial, Epigrams, 1.35.8-1.35.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Martial, Epigrams, 1.35.8-1.35.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.10.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.12.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

55.12.5.  Some of the Greeks, also, whose books we read with the object of acquiring a pure Attic style, have given it this name. Among the Greeks, Dio says, the aureus is exchanged for twenty drachmas. When Augustus had built his house, he made it all state property, either on account of the contributions made by the people or because he was high priest and wished to live in apartments that were at once private and public.
8. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 19.80-19.99 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
aetiology, origins, causae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
alexander the great Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
ambiguity (ambiguitas), ambivalent, double-edged speech, double-entendres Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
anna perenna (festival of) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
apollo Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
atellan farces Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 99
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
augustus, augustus house on the palatine Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
augustus (attributes of) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
caesar, julius Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
cato, the younger Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 33
ceres Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
chastity, lack of chastity, impudicitia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
closeness to the gods, of augustus and vesta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
demeter, and rape of proserpina Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 17
dionysus Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 17
divinity (of a mortal) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
emotions, happiness Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
erotic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
eroticism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
fasti praenestini Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
fertility Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
festivals, floralia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
festivals Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 33
flora Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 33
flora / floralia Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
floralia Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 33
honorific titles, augustus as pater patriae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
hyperbole Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
legend, myth, fabula Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
liber Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
matronalia Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 33
matrons Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
mime, mimus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
mimes Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 99
morality, moralistic language Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
nonnus, dionysiaca Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 17
ovid, metamorphoses Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 17
ovid Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
pantomime Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 99
penates Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
pledges of the empire, imperii pignora Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
praetor; presides at races Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 99
presence Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
priapus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
priests; christians as priests of peace' Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 99
ptolemies Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
ptolemy ii philadelphus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
recusatio Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
ritual Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 33
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
saturnalia Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 33
sexuality Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
song contests, in nonnus Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 17
song contests, in ovid Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 17
temple of vesta, in the forum Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
temple of vesta, on the palatine hill Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
temporal retrogression Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
textual space Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
theatricality Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
tiberius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
trojan Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
verrius flaccus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210
vesta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210, 213
vesta (augustan, pre-augustan) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 304
vestas fire Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 210