Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 4.11-4.12


tempora cum causis annalibus eruta priscisFrom ancient texts I sing the days and reasons


lapsaque sub terras ortaque signa cano.And the star-signs that rise and set, beneath the Earth.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22b. and by recounting the number of years occupied by the events mentioned he tried to calculate the periods of time. Whereupon one of the priests, a prodigiously old man, said, O Solon, Solon, you Greeks are always children: there is not such a thing as an old Greek. And on hearing this he asked, What mean you by this saying? And the priest replied, You are young in soul, every one of you. For therein you possess not a single belief that is ancient and derived from old tradition, nor yet one science that is hoary with age.
2. Cicero, On Laws, 2.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.1.47, 2.1.50 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Varro, On The Latin Language, 6.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Letters, 2.1.25, 2.1.27 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Livy, History, 43.13.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.1-1.49 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Ovid, Amores, 3.15.17-3.15.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Ovid, Fasti, 1.1-1.2, 1.7-1.8, 1.25, 3.87, 4.7-4.10, 4.12, 4.19-4.60, 4.79-4.162, 4.179-4.198 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. I’ll speak of divisions of time throughout the Roman year 1.2. Their origins, and the stars that set beneath the earth and rise. 1.7. Here you’ll revisit the sacred rites in the ancient texts 1.25. If it’s right and lawful, a poet, guide the poet’s reins 4.23. When Romulus established the length of the year 4.24. He recognised this, and commemorated your sires: 4.25. And as he granted first place among months to fierce Mars 4.26. Being the immediate cause of his own existence 4.27. So he granted the second month to Venus 4.28. Tracing his descent from her through many generations: 4.29. Searching for the roots of his race, unwinding the roll 4.30. of the centuries, he came at last to his divine kin. 4.31. He couldn’t be ignorant that Electra daughter of Atla 4.32. Bore Dardanus, that Electra had slept with Jove. 4.33. From Dardanus came Ericthonius, and from himTros: 4.34. He in turn produced Assaracus, and Assaracus Capys. 4.35. Next was Anchises, with whom Venu 4.36. Didn’t disdain to share the name of parent. 4.37. From them came Aeneas, whose piety was seen, carrying 4.38. Holy things, and a father as holy, on his shoulders, through the fire. 4.39. Now at last we come to the fortunate name of Iulus 4.40. Through whom the Julian house claims Teucrian ancestors. 4.41. Postumus was his, called Silvius among the Latin 4.42. Race, being born in the depth of the woods. 4.43. He was your father, Latinus. Alba followed Latinus: 4.44. Epytus was next to take your titles Alba. 4.45. Epytus gave his son Capys a Trojan name 4.46. And the same was your grandfather Calpetus. 4.47. When Tiberinus ruled his father’s kingdom after him 4.48. It’s said he drowned in a deep pool of the Tuscan river. 4.49. But before that he saw the birth of a son Agrippa 4.50. And a grandson Remulus, who was struck by lightning. 4.51. Aventinus followed them, from whom the place and the hill 4.52. Took their name. After him the realm passed to Proca. 4.53. He was succeeded by Numitor, brother to harsh Amulius. 4.54. Ilia and Lausus were then the children of Numitor. 4.55. Lausus fell to his uncle’s sword: Ilia pleased Mars 4.56. And bore you Quirinus, and your brother Remus. 4.57. You always claimed your parents were Mars and Venus 4.58. And deserved to be believed when you said so: 4.59. And you granted successive months to your race’s gods 4.60. So your descendants might not be in ignorance of the truth. 4.85. Where does envy not reach? Venus, there are some 4.86. Who’d grudge you your month, and snatch it away. 4.87. They say Spring was named from the open (apertum) season 4.88. Because Spring opens (aperit) everything and the sharp 4.89. Frost-bound cold vanishes, and fertile soil’s revealed 4.90. Though kind Venus sets her hand there and claims it. 4.91. She rules the whole world too, and truly deserves to: 4.92. She owns a realm not inferior to any god’s 4.93. Commands earth and heaven, and her native ocean 4.94. And maintains all beings from her source. 4.95. She created the gods (too numerous to mention): 4.96. She gave the crops and trees their first roots: 4.97. She brought the crude minds of men together 4.98. And taught them each to associate with a partner. 4.99. What but sweet pleasure creates all the race of birds? 4.100. Cattle wouldn’t mate, if gentle love were absent. 4.101. The wild ram butts the males with his horn 4.102. But won’t hurt the brow of his beloved ewe. 4.103. The bull, that the woods and pastures fear 4.104. Puts off his fierceness and follows the heifer. 4.105. The same force preserves whatever lives in the deep 4.106. And fills the waters with innumerable fish. 4.107. That force first stripped man of his wild apparel: 4.108. From it he learned refinement and elegance. 4.109. It’s said a banished lover first serenaded 4.110. His mistress by night, at her closed door 4.111. And eloquence then was the winning of a reluctant maid 4.112. And everyone pleaded his or her own cause. 4.113. A thousand arts are furthered by the goddess: and the wish 4.114. To delight has revealed many things that were hidden. 4.115. Who dares to steal her honour of naming the second month? 4.116. Let such madness be far from my thoughts. 4.117. Besides, though she’s powerful everywhere, her temple 4.118. Crowded, doesn’t she hold most sway in our City? 4.119. Venus, Roman, carried weapons to defend your Troy 4.120. And groaned at the spear wound in her gentle hand: 4.121. And she defeated two goddesses, by a Trojan judgement 4.122. (Ah! If only they hadn’t remembered her victory!) 4.123. And she was called the bride of Assaracus’s son 4.124. So that mighty Caesar would have Julian ancestors. 4.125. No season is more fitting for Venus than Spring: 4.126. In spring the earth gleams: in spring the ground’s soft 4.127. Now the grass pokes its tips through the broken soil 4.128. Now the vine bursts in buds through the swollen bark. 4.129. And lovely Venus deserves the lovely season 4.130. And is joined again to her darling Mars: 4.131. In Spring she tells the curving ships to sail, over 4.132. Her native seas, and fear the winter’s threat no longer. 4.133. Perform the rites of the goddess, Roman brides and mothers 4.134. And you who must not wear the headbands and long robes. 4.135. Remove the golden necklaces from her marble neck 4.136. Remove her riches: the goddess must be cleansed, complete. 4.137. Return the gold necklaces to her neck, once it’s dry: 4.138. Now she’s given fresh flowers, and new-sprung roses. 4.139. She commands you too to bathe, under the green myrtle 4.140. And there’s a particular reason for her command (learn, now!). 4.141. Naked, on the shore, she was drying her dripping hair: 4.142. The Satyrs, that wanton crowd, spied the goddess. 4.143. She sensed it, and hid her body with a screen of myrtle: 4.144. Doing so, she was safe: she commands that you do so too. 4.145. Learn now why you offer incense to Fortuna Virilis 4.146. In that place that steams with heated water. 4.147. All women remove their clothes on entering 4.148. And every blemish on their bodies is seen: 4.149. Virile Fortune undertakes to hide those from the men 4.150. And she does this at the behest of a little incense. 4.151. Don’t begrudge her poppies, crushed in creamy milk 4.152. And in flowing honey, squeezed from the comb: 4.153. When Venus was first led to her eager spouse 4.154. She drank so: and from that moment was a bride. 4.155. Please her with words of supplication: beauty 4.156. Virtue, and good repute are in her keeping. 4.157. In our forefather’s time Rome lapsed from chastity: 4.158. And the ancients consulted the old woman of Cumae. 4.159. She ordered a temple built to Venus: when it was done 4.160. Venus took the name of Heart-Changer (Verticordia). 4.161. Loveliest One, always look with a benign gaze 4.162. On the sons of Aeneas, and guard their many wives. 4.179. Let the sky turn three times on its axis 4.180. Let the Sun three times yoke and loose his horses 4.181. And the Berecyntian flute will begin sounding 4.182. Its curved horn, it will be the Idaean Mother’s feast. 4.183. Eunuchs will march, and sound the hollow drums 4.184. And cymbal will clash with cymbal, in ringing tones: 4.185. Seated on the soft necks of her servants, she’ll be carried 4.186. With howling, through the midst of the City streets. 4.187. The stage is set: the games are calling. Watch, then 4.188. Quirites, and let those legal wars in the fora cease. 4.189. I’d like to ask many things, but I’m made fearful 4.190. By shrill clash of bronze, and curved flute’s dreadful drone. 4.191. ‘Lend me someone to ask, goddess.’ Cybele spying her learned 4.192. Granddaughters, the Muses, ordered them to take care of me. 4.193. ‘Nurslings of Helicon, mindful of her orders, reveal 4.194. Why the Great Goddess delights in continual din.’ 4.195. So I spoke. And Erato replied (it fell to her to speak about 4.196. Venus’ month, because her name derives from tender love): 4.197. ‘Saturn was granted this prophecy: “Noblest of kings 4.198. You’ll be ousted by your own son’s sceptre.”
10. Tacitus, Annals, 2.88 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.88.  I find from contemporary authors, who were members of the senate, that a letter was read in the curia from the Chattan chief Adgandestrius, promising the death of Arminius, if poison were sent to do the work; to which the reply went back that "it was not by treason nor in the dark but openly and in arms that the Roman people took vengeance on their foes": a high saying intended to place Tiberius on a level with the old commanders who prohibited, and disclosed, the offer to poison King Pyrrhus. Arminius himself, encouraged by the gradual retirement of the Romans and the expulsion of Maroboduus, began to aim at kingship, and found himself in conflict with the independent temper of his countrymen. He was attacked by arms, and, while defending himself with chequered results, fell by the treachery of his relatives. Undoubtedly the liberator of Germany; a man who, not in its infancy as captains and kings before him, but in the high noon of its sovereignty, threw down the challenge to the Roman nation, in battle with ambiguous results, in war without defeat; he completed thirty-seven years of life, twelve of power, and to this day is sung in tribal lays, though he is an unknown being to Greek historians, who admire only the history of Greece, and receives less than his due from us of Rome, who glorify the ancient days and show little concern for our own.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology, origins, causae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34, 133
agricultural cycle of festivals in april Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 131
alexandrian poetry Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34
alma in fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 131
antiquarian literature Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34
antiquus (ancient) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
apollo, temple of, on delos Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
architecture and art, roman appreciation Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
art and architecture, roman appreciation Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
book per month structure of fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 102
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
callimachus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34, 133
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
delos Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
emotions Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
epiphany, of romulus-quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
etiological elegy, and venus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 127
etiological elegy, generic negotiation of Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 127
etiological elegy Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 127, 131
euhemerus, euhemeristic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
festivals, ludi saeculares Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
festivals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34, 133
genealogy, of julians Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 128, 129
genre, in proem to fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 127
imperial family Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
julius caesar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34
juno, temples of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
lucretius, influence of on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 129, 130
magna mater, as alma Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 131
month-names, aprilis Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 128, 129
months, paired, march and april Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 131
mother theme in fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 131
muse, muses Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
pacis, as mother of the gods Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 130
pacis, as patron of ovids erotic elegy Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 127
pacis, as vegetative mother Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 130
palimpsestic rome, attitude to authentic antiquity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
palimpsestic rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
plato Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
proems as structuring device Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 126, 127, 128
religio' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34, 133
romulus, as calendar-builder Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 128, 129
romulus, deified, quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
salii, carmen saliare Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
samos, temple of juno Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
ship motif as structuring device Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 102
temple of, apollo on delos Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
temple of juno on samos Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261
varro, m. terentius, influence of on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 131
varros antiquitates rerum divinarum et humanarum Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34
vates, inspired poet Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
venus, and mars Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 128, 129
venus, as alma Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 131
venus, as ancestor of romans and gens iulia Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 128, 129
venus, as creatrix of animals Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 130
venus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 34
verres, depredations of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 261