Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 3.87


quod si forte vacas, peregrinos inspice fastos:If you have time examine various calendars.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Cicero, Academica, a b c d\n0 "1.9" "1.9" "1 9" (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Ovid, Fasti, 1.1-1.2, 1.7-1.8, 1.25, 1.31-1.38, 1.43-1.44, 1.657, 2.55-2.56, 2.58, 2.571-2.582, 3.73-3.78, 3.85-3.86, 3.88-3.98, 3.101-3.102, 3.111-3.112, 3.121-3.126, 3.143, 3.151-3.166, 3.523-3.542, 4.11-4.12, 4.21-4.22, 4.30, 4.55-4.60, 4.95-4.162, 4.179-4.198, 4.377-4.378, 4.725-4.728, 4.905-4.942, 5.129-5.142, 5.145-5.146, 6.227-6.234, 6.237-6.238 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. I’ll speak of divisions of time throughout the Roman year 1.2. Their origins, and the stars that set beneath the earth and rise. 1.7. Here you’ll revisit the sacred rites in the ancient texts 1.25. If it’s right and lawful, a poet, guide the poet’s reins 1.31. Yet there’s a logic that might have possessed him 1.32. Caesar, and that might well justify his error. 1.33. He held that the time it takes for a mother’s womb 1.34. To produce a child, was sufficient for his year. 1.35. For as many months also, after her husband’s funeral 1.36. A widow maintains signs of mourning in her house. 1.37. So Quirinus in his ceremonial robes had that in view 1.38. When he decreed his year to an unsophisticated people. 1.43. But Numa did not neglect Janus and the ancestral shades 1.44. And therefore added two months to the ancient ten. 1.657. But nowhere found the Day of Sowing: 2.55. At the start of the month they say that Juno the Saviour (Sospita) 2.56. Neighbouring the Phrygian Mother, was honoured with new shrines. 2.58. On the Kalends, are now, they are fallen with the lapse of time. 2.571. See, an old woman sitting amongst the girls performs the rite 2.572. of Tacita, the Silent (though she herself is not silent) 2.573. With three fingers, she sets three lumps of incense 2.574. Under the sill, where the little mouse makes its secret path: 2.575. Then she fastens enchanted threads together with dark lead 2.576. And turns seven black beans over and over in her mouth 2.577. And bakes the head of a sprat in the fire, mouth sewn up 2.578. With pitch, pierced right through with a bronze needle. 2.579. She drops wine on it too, and she or her friend 2.580. Drink the wine that’s left, though she gets most. 2.581. On leaving she says: ‘We have sealed up hostile mouth 2.582. And unfriendly tongues’: and the old woman exits drunk. 3.97. In order to take precedence over all these, at least 3.98. Romulus gave the first month to the father of his race. 3.101. Greece, defeated had not yet transmitted her art 3.102. To the conquerors, her people eloquent but not brave. 3.111. The stars then ran their course, freely, unobserved 3.112. Each year: yet everyone held them to be gods. 3.121. A year was when the moon returned to full for the tenth time: 3.122. And that was a number that was held in high honour: 3.123. Because it’s the number of fingers we usually count with 3.124. Or because a woman produces in ten months 3.125. Or because the numerals ascend from one to ten 3.126. And from that point we begin a fresh interval. 3.143. Also, it’s said, a new fire is lit at her secret shrine 3.151. Numa Pompilius, led to Rome from the lands of olives 3.152. Was the first to realise the year lacked two months 3.153. Learning it from Pythagoras of Samos, who believed 3.154. We could be reborn, or was taught it by his own Egeria. 3.155. But the calendar was still erratic down to the time 3.156. When Caesar took it, and many other things, in hand. 3.157. That god, the founder of a mighty house, did not 3.158. Regard the matter as beneath his attention 3.159. And wished to have prescience of those heaven 3.160. Promised him, not be an unknown god entering a strange house. 3.161. He is said to have drawn up an exact table 3.162. of the periods in which the sun returns to its previous signs. 3.163. He added sixty-five days to three hundred 3.164. And then added a fifth part of a whole day. 3.165. That’s the measure of the year: one day 3.166. The sum of the five part-days is added to each lustre. 3.523. Not far from your banks, Tiber, far flowing river. 3.524. The people come and drink there, scattered on the grass 3.525. And every man reclines there with his girl. 3.526. Some tolerate the open sky, a few pitch tents 3.527. And some make leafy huts out of branches 3.528. While others set reeds up, to form rigid pillars 3.529. And hang their outspread robes from the reeds. 3.530. But they’re warmed by sun and wine, and pray 3.531. For as many years as cups, as many as they drink. 3.532. There you’ll find a man who quaffs Nestor’s years 3.533. A woman who’d age as the Sibyl, in her cups. 3.534. There they sing whatever they’ve learnt in the theatres 3.535. Beating time to the words with ready hands 3.536. And setting the bowl down, dance coarsely 3.537. The trim girl leaping about with streaming hair. 3.538. Homecoming they stagger, a sight for vulgar eyes 3.539. And the crowd meeting them call them ‘blessed’. 3.540. I fell in with the procession lately (it seems to me worth 3.541. Saying): a tipsy old woman dragging a tipsy old man. 3.542. But since errors abound as to who this goddess is 4.11. From ancient texts I sing the days and reasons 4.30. of the centuries, he came at last to his divine kin. 4.55. Lausus fell to his uncle’s sword: Ilia pleased Mars 4.56. And bore you Quirinus, and your brother Remus. 4.57. You always claimed your parents were Mars and Venus 4.58. And deserved to be believed when you said so: 4.59. And you granted successive months to your race’s gods 4.60. So your descendants might not be in ignorance of the truth. 4.95. She created the gods (too numerous to mention): 4.96. She gave the crops and trees their first roots: 4.97. She brought the crude minds of men together 4.98. And taught them each to associate with a partner. 4.99. What but sweet pleasure creates all the race of birds? 4.100. Cattle wouldn’t mate, if gentle love were absent. 4.101. The wild ram butts the males with his horn 4.102. But won’t hurt the brow of his beloved ewe. 4.103. The bull, that the woods and pastures fear 4.104. Puts off his fierceness and follows the heifer. 4.105. The same force preserves whatever lives in the deep 4.106. And fills the waters with innumerable fish. 4.107. That force first stripped man of his wild apparel: 4.108. From it he learned refinement and elegance. 4.109. It’s said a banished lover first serenaded 4.110. His mistress by night, at her closed door 4.111. And eloquence then was the winning of a reluctant maid 4.112. And everyone pleaded his or her own cause. 4.113. A thousand arts are furthered by the goddess: and the wish 4.114. To delight has revealed many things that were hidden. 4.115. Who dares to steal her honour of naming the second month? 4.116. Let such madness be far from my thoughts. 4.117. Besides, though she’s powerful everywhere, her temple 4.118. Crowded, doesn’t she hold most sway in our City? 4.119. Venus, Roman, carried weapons to defend your Troy 4.120. And groaned at the spear wound in her gentle hand: 4.121. And she defeated two goddesses, by a Trojan judgement 4.122. (Ah! If only they hadn’t remembered her victory!) 4.123. And she was called the bride of Assaracus’s son 4.124. So that mighty Caesar would have Julian ancestors. 4.125. No season is more fitting for Venus than Spring: 4.126. In spring the earth gleams: in spring the ground’s soft 4.127. Now the grass pokes its tips through the broken soil 4.128. Now the vine bursts in buds through the swollen bark. 4.129. And lovely Venus deserves the lovely season 4.130. And is joined again to her darling Mars: 4.131. In Spring she tells the curving ships to sail, over 4.132. Her native seas, and fear the winter’s threat no longer. 4.133. Perform the rites of the goddess, Roman brides and mothers 4.134. And you who must not wear the headbands and long robes. 4.135. Remove the golden necklaces from her marble neck 4.136. Remove her riches: the goddess must be cleansed, complete. 4.137. Return the gold necklaces to her neck, once it’s dry: 4.138. Now she’s given fresh flowers, and new-sprung roses. 4.139. She commands you too to bathe, under the green myrtle 4.140. And there’s a particular reason for her command (learn, now!). 4.141. Naked, on the shore, she was drying her dripping hair: 4.142. The Satyrs, that wanton crowd, spied the goddess. 4.143. She sensed it, and hid her body with a screen of myrtle: 4.144. Doing so, she was safe: she commands that you do so too. 4.145. Learn now why you offer incense to Fortuna Virilis 4.146. In that place that steams with heated water. 4.147. All women remove their clothes on entering 4.148. And every blemish on their bodies is seen: 4.149. Virile Fortune undertakes to hide those from the men 4.150. And she does this at the behest of a little incense. 4.151. Don’t begrudge her poppies, crushed in creamy milk 4.152. And in flowing honey, squeezed from the comb: 4.153. When Venus was first led to her eager spouse 4.154. She drank so: and from that moment was a bride. 4.155. Please her with words of supplication: beauty 4.156. Virtue, and good repute are in her keeping. 4.157. In our forefather’s time Rome lapsed from chastity: 4.158. And the ancients consulted the old woman of Cumae. 4.159. She ordered a temple built to Venus: when it was done 4.160. Venus took the name of Heart-Changer (Verticordia). 4.161. Loveliest One, always look with a benign gaze 4.162. On the sons of Aeneas, and guard their many wives. 4.179. Let the sky turn three times on its axis 4.180. Let the Sun three times yoke and loose his horses 4.181. And the Berecyntian flute will begin sounding 4.182. Its curved horn, it will be the Idaean Mother’s feast. 4.183. Eunuchs will march, and sound the hollow drums 4.184. And cymbal will clash with cymbal, in ringing tones: 4.185. Seated on the soft necks of her servants, she’ll be carried 4.186. With howling, through the midst of the City streets. 4.187. The stage is set: the games are calling. Watch, then 4.188. Quirites, and let those legal wars in the fora cease. 4.189. I’d like to ask many things, but I’m made fearful 4.190. By shrill clash of bronze, and curved flute’s dreadful drone. 4.191. ‘Lend me someone to ask, goddess.’ Cybele spying her learned 4.192. Granddaughters, the Muses, ordered them to take care of me. 4.193. ‘Nurslings of Helicon, mindful of her orders, reveal 4.194. Why the Great Goddess delights in continual din.’ 4.195. So I spoke. And Erato replied (it fell to her to speak about 4.196. Venus’ month, because her name derives from tender love): 4.197. ‘Saturn was granted this prophecy: “Noblest of kings 4.198. You’ll be ousted by your own son’s sceptre.” 4.377. It was the third day of the games (I recall), and a certain 4.378. Elderly man, who was sitting next to me at the show, said: 4.725. Indeed, I’ve often brought ashes of a calf, and stalk 4.726. of beans, in chaste purification, in my full hands: 4.727. Indeed, I’ve leapt the threefold line of flames 4.728. And the wet laurel’s sprinkled me with dew. 4.905. A white-robed throng blocked my road. 4.906. A priest was going to the grove of old Mildew (Robigo) 4.907. To offer the entrails of a dog and a sheep to the flames. 4.908. I went with him, so as not to be ignorant of the rite: 4.909. Your priest, Quirinus, pronounced these words: 4.910. ‘Scaly Mildew, spare the blades of corn 4.911. And let their tender tips quiver above the soil. 4.912. Let the crops grow, nurtured by favourable stars 4.913. Until they’re ready for the sickle. 4.914. Your power’s not slight: the corn you blight 4.915. The grieving farmer gives up for lost. 4.916. Wind and showers don’t harm the wheat as much 4.917. Nor gleaming frost that bleaches the yellow corn 4.918. As when the sun heats the moist stalks: 4.919. Then, dreadful goddess, is the time of your wrath. 4.920. Spare us, I pray, take your blighted hands from the harvest 4.921. And don’t harm the crop: it’s enough that you can harm. 4.922. Grip harsh iron rather than the tender wheat 4.923. Destroy whatever can destroy others first. 4.924. Better to gnaw at swords and harmful spears: 4.925. They’re not needed: the world’s at peace. 4.926. Let the rural wealth gleam now, rakes, sturdy hoes 4.927. And curved ploughshare: let rust stain weapons: 4.928. And whoever tries to draw his sword from its sheath 4.929. Let him feel it wedded there by long disuse. 4.930. Don’t you hurt the corn, and may the farmer’ 4.931. Prayer to you always be fulfilled by your absence.’ 4.932. He spoke: to his right there was a soft towel 4.933. And a cup of wine and an incense casket. 4.934. He offered the incense and wine on the hearth 4.935. Sheep’s entrails, and (I saw him) the foul guts of a vile dog. 4.936. Then the priest said: ‘You ask why we offer an odd sacrifice 4.937. In these rites’ (I had asked) ‘then learn the reason. 4.938. There’s a Dog they call Icarian, and when it rise 4.939. The dry earth is parched, and the crops ripen prematurely. 4.940. This dog is set on the altar to signify the starry one 4.941. And the only reason for it is because of the name.’ 4.942. When Aurora’s left Tithonus, kin to Phrygian Assaracus 5.131. Curius vowed them: but time destroys many things 5.132. And the long ages wear away the stone. 6.227. ‘Till the calm Tiber carries the sweepings from the shrine 6.228. of Ilian Vesta, on its yellow waves to the sea 6.229. I’m not allowed to comb my hair with a toothed comb 6.230. Nor to cut my nails with anything made of iron 6.231. Nor to touch my husband, though he’s Jove’s priest 6.232. And though he was given to me by law for life. 6.233. Don’t be in a hurry. Your daughter will be better wed 6.234. When Vesta’s fire gleams on purified earth.’


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology, origins, causae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
ancestors Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
antiquarianism Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
augustan ideology of time Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35, 46, 47, 69
caesar, c. julius, as calendar-builder Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
calendar, of romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
calendar, roman, and latin calendars as source for fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
calendar, roman, and social control Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 46, 47, 69
calendar, roman, as controlling the stars Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
calendar, roman, julian and augustan revisions to Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
callimachus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
carmentis Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121, 133
di manes Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
divine genealogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
divine origins Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
doubt Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
emotions Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
epiphany, of romulus-quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
etiology, and antiquarianism Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
euhemerus, euhemeristic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
festivals, ludi saeculares Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
festivals, parentalia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
festivals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
genealogy, of romulus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 46, 47
hercules Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
imperial family Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
mars, as father of romulus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 46, 47
mars, in italian calendars Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 47
mars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
month-names, martius' Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 46
months in the fasti, april Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
months in the fasti, february Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
months in the fasti, january Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
months in the fasti, march Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
muse, muses Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
mythical past Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
numa, as calendar-builder Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
numa Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
ovids poems, metamorphoses Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
piety, pietas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
playfulness Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
pythagoras as numas teacher Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
romulus, as calendar-builder Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
romulus, deified, quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
romulus, genealogy of Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 46, 47
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121, 133
salii, carmen saliare Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
scepticism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
varro, m. terentius, influence of on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
vates, inspired poet Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
venus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 121
verrius flaccus, influence on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35