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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 3.523-3.696


Idibus est Annae festum geniale PerennaeNot far from your banks, Tiber, far flowing river.


non procul a ripis, advena Thybri, tuis.The people come and drink there, scattered on the grass


plebs venit ac virides passim disiecta per herbasAnd every man reclines there with his girl.


potat, et accumbit cum pare quisque sua.Some tolerate the open sky, a few pitch tents


sub Iove pars durat, pauci tentoria ponuntAnd some make leafy huts out of branches


sunt quibus e ramis frondea facta casa estWhile others set reeds up, to form rigid pillars


pars, ubi pro rigidis calamos statuere columnisAnd hang their outspread robes from the reeds.


desuper extentas imposuere togas.But they’re warmed by sun and wine, and pray


sole tamen vinoque calent annosque precanturFor as many years as cups, as many as they drink.


quot sumant cyathos, ad numerumque bibunt.There you’ll find a man who quaffs Nestor’s years


invenies illic, qui Nestoris ebibat annosA woman who’d age as the Sibyl, in her cups.


quae sit per calices facta Sibylla suos.There they sing whatever they’ve learnt in the theatres


illic et cantant, quicquid didicere theatrisBeating time to the words with ready hands


et iactant faciles ad sua verba manusAnd setting the bowl down, dance coarsely


et ducunt posito duras cratere choreasThe trim girl leaping about with streaming hair.


cultaque diffusis saltat amica comisHomecoming they stagger, a sight for vulgar eyes


cum redeunt, titubant et sunt spectacula volgiAnd the crowd meeting them call them ‘blessed’.


et fortunatos obvia turba vocat.I fell in with the procession lately (it seems to me worth


occurrit nuper (visa est mihi digna relatu)Saying): a tipsy old woman dragging a tipsy old man.


pompa: senem potum pota trahebat anus.But since errors abound as to who this goddess is


quae tamen haec dea sit, quoniam rumoribus erratI’m determined not to cloak her story.


fabula proposito nulla tegenda meo.Wretched Dido burned with love for Aeneas


arserat Aeneae Dido miserabilis igneShe burned on the pyre built for her funeral:


arserat exstructis in sua fata rogis;Her ashes were gathered, and this brief couplet


compositusque cinis, tumulique in marmore carmenWhich she left, in dying, adorned her tomb:


hoc breve, quod moriens ipsa reliquit, erat:AENEAS THE REASON, HIS THE BLADE EMPLOYED.


“praebuit Aeneas et causam mortis et ensem.DIDO BY HER OWN HAND WAS DESTROYED.


ipsa sua Dido concidit usa manu.”The Numidians immediately invaded the defencele


protinus invadunt Numidae sine vindice regnumRealm, and Iarbas the Moor captured and held the palace.


et potitur capta Maurus Iarba domoRemembering her scorn, he said: ‘See, I, whom she


seque memor spretum, Thalamis tamen inquit ‘ElissaeSo many times rejected, now enjoy Elissa’s marriage bed.’


en ego, quem totiens reppulit illa, fruor.’The Tyrians scattered, as each chanced to stray, as bee


diffugiunt Tyrii, quo quemque agit error, ut olimOften wander confusedly, having lost their Queen.


amisso dubiae rege vagantur apes.Anna, was driven from her home, weeping on leaving


tertia nudandas acceperat area messesHer sister’s city, after first paying honour to that sister.


inque cavos ierant tertia musta lacus:The loose ashes drank perfume mixed with tears


pellitur Anna domo lacrimansque sororia linquitAnd received an offering of her shorn hair:


moenia: germanae iusta dat ante suae.Three times she said: ‘Farewell!’ three times lifted


mixta bibunt molles lacrimis unguenta favillaeAnd pressed the ashes to her lips, seeing her sister there.


vertice libatas accipiuntque comas;Finding a ship, and companions for her flight, she glided


terque vale! dixit, cineres ter ad ora relatosAway, looking back at the city, her sister’s sweet work.


pressit, et est illis visa subesse soror.There’s a fertile island, Melite, near barren Cosyra


nancta ratem comitesque fugae pede labitur aequoLashed by the waves of the Libyan sea. Trusting in


moenia respiciens, dulce sororis opus.The king’s former hospitality, she headed there


fertilis est Melite sterili vicina CosyraeBattus was king there, and was a wealthy host.


insula, quam Libyci verberat unda fretiWhen he had learned the fates of the two sisters


hanc petit hospitio regis confisa vetusto:He said: ‘This land, however small, is yours.’


hospes opum dives rex ibi Battus erat.He would have been hospitable to the end


qui postquam didicit casus utriusque sororisExcept that he feared Pygmalion’s great power.


haec inquit tellus quantulacumque tua est.The corn had been taken to be threshed a third time


et tamen hospitii servasset ad ultima munusAnd a third time the new wine poured into empty vats.


sed timuit magnas Pygmalionis opes.The sun had twice circled the zodiac, and a third year


signa recensuerat bis sol sua, tertius ibatWas passing, when Anna had to find a fresh place of exile.


annus, et exilio terra paranda nova est.Her brother came seeking war. The king hated weapons


frater adest belloque petit. rex arma perosusAnd said: ‘We are peaceable, flee for your own safety!’


nos sumus inbelles, tu fuge sospes! ait.She fled at his command, gave her ship to the wind and waves:


iussa fugit ventoque ratem committit et undis:Her brother was crueller than any ocean.


asperior quovis aequore frater erat.There’s a little field by the fish-filled stream


est prope piscosos lapidosi Crathidis amnesOf stony Crathis: the local people call it Camere.


parvus ager: Cameren incola turba vocatThere she sailed, and when she was no further away


illuc cursus erat, nec longius afuit indeThan the distance reached by nine slingshots


quam quantum novies mittere funda potest:The sails first fell and then flapped in the light breeze.


vela cadunt primo et dubia librantur ab aura.‘Attack the water with oars!’ cried the captain.


findite remigio navita dixit aquas!And while they made ready to reef the sails


dumque parant torto subducere carbasa linoThe swift South Wind struck the curved stern


percutitur rapido puppis adunca notoAnd despite the captain’s efforts swept them


inque patens aequor frustra pugnante magistroInto the open sea: the land was lost to sight.


fertur, et ex oculis visa refugit humusThe waves attacked them, and the ocean heaved


adsiliunt fluctus, imoque a gurgite pontusFrom the depths, and the hull gulped the foaming waters.


vertitur, et canas alveus haurit aquasSkill is defeated by the wind, the steersman no longer


vincitur ars vento, nec iam moderator habenisGuides the helm, but he too turns to prayer for aid.


utitur; a votis is quoque poscit opem.The Phoenician exile is thrown high on swollen waves


iactatur tumidas exul Phoenissa per undasAnd hides her weeping eyes in her robe:


humidaque opposita lumina veste tegit:Then for a first time she called her sister Dido happy


tunc primum Dido felix est dicta sororiAnd whoever, anywhere, might be treading dry land.


et quaecumque aliquam corpore pressit humumA great gust drove the ship to the Laurentine shore


figitur ad Laurens ingenti flamine litusAnd, foundering, it perished, when all had landed.


puppis et expositis omnibus hausta perit.Meanwhile pious Aeneas had gained Latinus’ realm


iam pius Aeneas regno nataque LatiniAnd his daughter too, and had merged both peoples.


auctus erat, populos miscueratque duos.While he was walking barefoot along the shore


litore dotali solo comitatus AchateThat had been his dower, accompanied only by Achates


secretum nudo dum pede carpit iterHe saw Anna wandering, not believing it was her:


aspicit errantem nec credere sustinet Annam‘Why should she be here in the fields of Latium?’


esse: quid in Latios illa veniret agros?Aeneas said to himself: ‘It’s Anna!’ shouted Achates:


dum secum Aeneas, Anna est! exclamat Achates:At the sound of her name she raised her face.


ad nomen voltus sustulit illa suos.Alas, what should she do? Flee? Wish for the ground


heu! fugiat? quid agat? quos terrae quaerat hiatus?To swallow her? Her wretched sister’s fate was before her eyes.


ante oculos miserae fata sororis erant.The Cytherean hero felt her fear, and spoke to her


sensit et adloquitur trepidam Cythereius heros(He still wept, moved by your memory, Elissa):


(fiet tamen admonitu motus, Elissa, tui):‘Anna, I swear, by this land that you once knew


‘Anna, per hanc iuro, quam quondam audire solebasA happier fate had granted me, and by the god


tellurem fato prosperiore dariMy companions, who have lately found a home here


perque deos comites, hac nuper sede locatosThat all of them often rebuked me for my delay.


saepe meas illos increpuisse morasYet I did not fear her dying, that fear was absent.


nec timui de morte tamen, metus abfuit iste.Ah me! Her courage was beyond belief.


ei mihi! credibili fortior illa fuit.Don’t re-tell it: I saw shameful wounds on her body


ne refer: aspexi non illo corpore dignaWhen I dared to visit the houses of Tartarus.


volnera Tartareas ausus adire domosBut you shall enjoy the comforts of my kingdom


at tu, seu ratio te nostris appulit orisWhether your will or a god brings you to our shores.


sive deus, regni commoda carpe mei.I owe you much, and owe Elissa not a little:


multa tibi memores, nil non debemus Elissae:You are welcome for your own and your sister’s sake.’


nomine grata tuo, grata sororis, eris.’She accepted his words (no other hope was left)


talia dicenti (neque enim spes altera restat)And told him of her own wanderings.


credidit, errores exposuitque suos.When she entered the palace, dressed in Tyrian style


utque domum intravit Tyrios induta paratusAeneas spoke (the rest of the throng were silent):


incipit Aeneas (cetera turba silet):‘Lavinia, my wife, I have a pious reason for entrusting


‘hanc tibi cur tradam, pia causa, Lavinia coniunxThis lady to you: shipwrecked, I lived at her expense.


est mihi: consumpsi naufragus huius opes.She’s of Tyrian birth: her kingdom’s on the Libyan shore:


orta Tyro est, regnum Libyca possedit in ora;I beg you to love her, as your dear sister.’


quam precor ut carae more sororis ames.’Lavinia promised all, but hid a fancied wrong


omnia promittit falsumque Lavinia volnusWithin her silent heart, and concealed her fears:


mente premit tacita dissimulatque fremens;And though she saw many gifts given away openly


donaque cum videat praeter sua lumina ferriShe suspected many more were sent secretly.


multa palam, mitti clam quoque multa putatShe hadn’t yet decided what to do: she hated


non habet exactum, quid agat; furialiter oditWith fury, prepared a plan, and wished to die avenged.


et parat insidias et cupit ulta mori.It was night: it seemed her sister Dido stood


nox erat: ante torum visa est adstare sororisBefore her bed, her straggling hair stained with her blood


squalenti Dido sanguinulenta comaCrying: ‘Flee, don’t hesitate, flee this gloomy house!’


et fuge, ne dubita, maestum fuge dicere tectum!At the words a gust slammed the creaking door.


sub verbum querulas impulit aura foresAnna leapt up, then jumped from a low window


exilit et velox humili super arva fenestraTo the ground: fear itself had made her daring.


se iacit: audacem fecerat ipse timor.With terror driving her, clothed in her loose vest


quaque metu rapitur, tunica velata recinctaShe runs like a frightened doe that hears the wolves.


currit, ut auditis territa damma lupisIt’s thought that horned Numicius swept her away


corniger hanc tumidis rapuisse Numicius undisIn his swollen flood, and hid her among his pools.


creditur et stagnis occuluisse suis.Meanwhile, shouting, they searched for the Sidonian lady


Sidonis interea magno clamore per agrosThrough the fields: traces and tracks were visible:


quaeritur: apparent signa notaeque pedum:Reaching the banks, they found her footprints there.


ventum erat ad ripas: inerant vestigia ripis.The knowing river stemmed his silent waters.


sustinuit tacitas conscius amnis aquas.She herself appeared, saying: ‘I’m a nymph of the calm


ipsa loqui visa est ‘placidi sum nympha Numici:Numicius: hid in perennial waters, Anna Perenna’s my name.’


amne perenne latens Anna Perenna vocor.’Quickly they set out a feast in the fields they’d roamed


protinus erratis laeti vescuntur in agrisAnd celebrated their deeds and the day, with copious wine.


et celebrant largo seque diemque mero.Some think she’s the Moon, because she measures out


sunt quibus haec Luna est, quia mensibus impleat annum;The year (annus): others, Themis, or the Inachian heifer.


pars Themin, Inachiam pars putat esse bovem.Anna, you’ll find some to say you’re a nymph, daughter


invenies, qui te nymphen Atlantida dicantOf Azan, and gave Jupiter his first nourishment.


teque Iovi primos, Anna, dedisse cibos.I’ll relate another tale that’s come to my ears


haec quoque, quam referam, nostras pervenit ad auresAnd it’s not so far away from the truth.


fama nec a veri dissidet illa fide.The Plebs of old, not yet protected by Tribunes


plebs vetus et nullis etiam nunc tuta tribunisFled, and gathered on the Sacred Mount:


fugit et in Sacri vertice montis erat;The food supplies they’d brought with them failed


iam quoque, quem secum tulerant, defecerat illosAlso the stores of bread fit for human consumption.


victus et humanis usibus apta CeresThere was a certain Anna from suburban Bovillae


orta suburbanis quaedam fuit Anna BovillisA poor woman, old, but very industrious.


pauper, sed multae sedulitatis anus.With her grey hair bound up in a light cap


illa levi mitra canos incincta capillosShe used to make coarse cakes with a trembling hand


Angebat tremula rustica liba manuAnd distribute them, still warm, among the people


atque ita per populum fumantia mane solebatEach morning: this supply of hers pleased them all.


dividere: haec populo copia grata fuit.When peace was made at home, they set up a statue


pace domi facta signum posuere PerennaeTo Perenna, because she’d helped supply their needs.


quod sibi defectis illa ferebat opem.Now it’s left for me to tell why the girls sing coarse songs:


nunc mihi cur cantent superest obscena puellaeSince they gather together to sing certain infamous things.


dicere; nam coeunt certaque probra canuntAnna had lately been made a goddess: Gradivus came to her


nuper erat dea facta: venit Gradivus ad AnnamAnd taking her aside, spoke these words:


et cum seducta talia verba facit:You honour my month: I’ve joined my season to yours:


‘mense meo coleris, iunxi mea tempora tecum:I’ve great hopes you can do me a service.


pendet ab officio spes mihi magna tuo.Armed, I’m captivated by armed Minerva


armifer armiferae correptus amore MinervaeI burn, and have nursed the wound for many a day.


uror et hoc longo tempore volnus alo.Help us, alike in our pursuits, to become one:


effice, di studio similes coeamus in unum:The part suits you well, courteous old lady.’


conveniunt partes hae tibi, comis anus.’He spoke. She tricked the god with empty promises.


dixerat, illa deum promisso ludit inaniAnd led him on, in foolish hope, with false delays.


et stultam dubia spem trahit usque mora.Often, when he pressed her, she said: ‘I’ve done as you asked


saepius instanti mandata peregimus, inquitShe’s won, she’s yielded at last to your prayers.’


evicta est, precibus vix dedit illa manus.The lover believed her and prepared the marriage-chamber.


credit amans thalamosque parat, deducitur illucThey led Anna there, a new bride, her face veiled.


Anna tegens voltus, ut nova nupta, suos.About to kiss her, Mars suddenly saw it was Anna:


oscula sumpturus subito Mars aspicit Annam:Shame and anger alternating stirred the hoodwinked god.


nunc pudor elusum, nunc subit ira deum.The new goddess laughed at her dear Minerva’s lover.


ridet amatorem carae nova diva MinervaeNothing indeed has ever pleased Venus more.


nec res hac Veneri gratior ulla fuit.So now they tell old jokes, and coarse songs are sung


inde ioci veteres obscenaque dicta canunturAnd they delight in how the great god was cheated.


et iuvat hanc magno verba dedisse deo.I was about to neglect those daggers that pierced


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 4.450, 8.64, 15.191, 16.857, 22.363 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.450. /Then were heard alike the sound of groaning and the cry of triumph of the slayers and the slain, and the earth flowed with blood. As when winter torrents, flowing down the mountains from their great springs to a place where two valleys meet, join their mighty floods in a deep gorge 8.64. /But when they were met together and come into one place, then clashed they their shields and spears, and the fury of bronze-mailed warriors; and the bossed shields closed each with each, and a great din arose. Then were heard alike the sound of groaning and the cry of triumph 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 16.857. /Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him; and his soul fleeting from his limbs was gone to Hades, bewailing her fate, leaving manliness and youth. And to him even in his death spake glorious Hector:Patroclus, wherefore dost thou prophesy for me sheer destruction? 22.363. /valorous though thou art, at the Scaean gate. Even as he thus spake the end of death enfolded him and his soul fleeting from his limbs was gone to Hades, bewailing her fate, leaving manliness and youth. And to him even in his death spake goodly Achilles:
2. Homer, Odyssey, 6.34-6.35, 11.609-11.612, 20.353-20.356, 24.5-24.8 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Academica, a b c d\n0 "1.9" "1.9" "1 9" (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Fasti, 1.657, 2.55-2.56, 2.58, 2.571-2.582, 3.87-3.98, 3.524-3.710, 4.377-4.378, 4.725-4.728, 4.905-4.942, 5.129-5.142, 5.145-5.146, 6.227-6.234, 6.237-6.238 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.657. But nowhere found the Day of Sowing: 2.55. At the start of the month they say that Juno the Saviour (Sospita) 2.56. Neighbouring the Phrygian Mother, was honoured with new shrines. 2.58. On the Kalends, are now, they are fallen with the lapse of time. 2.571. See, an old woman sitting amongst the girls performs the rite 2.572. of Tacita, the Silent (though she herself is not silent) 2.573. With three fingers, she sets three lumps of incense 2.574. Under the sill, where the little mouse makes its secret path: 2.575. Then she fastens enchanted threads together with dark lead 2.576. And turns seven black beans over and over in her mouth 2.577. And bakes the head of a sprat in the fire, mouth sewn up 2.578. With pitch, pierced right through with a bronze needle. 2.579. She drops wine on it too, and she or her friend 2.580. Drink the wine that’s left, though she gets most. 2.581. On leaving she says: ‘We have sealed up hostile mouth 2.582. And unfriendly tongues’: and the old woman exits drunk. 3.97. In order to take precedence over all these, at least 3.98. Romulus gave the first month to the father of his race. 3.524. The people come and drink there, scattered on the grass 3.525. And every man reclines there with his girl. 3.526. Some tolerate the open sky, a few pitch tents 3.527. And some make leafy huts out of branches 3.528. While others set reeds up, to form rigid pillars 3.529. And hang their outspread robes from the reeds. 3.530. But they’re warmed by sun and wine, and pray 3.531. For as many years as cups, as many as they drink. 3.532. There you’ll find a man who quaffs Nestor’s years 3.533. A woman who’d age as the Sibyl, in her cups. 3.534. There they sing whatever they’ve learnt in the theatres 3.535. Beating time to the words with ready hands 3.536. And setting the bowl down, dance coarsely 3.537. The trim girl leaping about with streaming hair. 3.538. Homecoming they stagger, a sight for vulgar eyes 3.539. And the crowd meeting them call them ‘blessed’. 3.540. I fell in with the procession lately (it seems to me worth 3.541. Saying): a tipsy old woman dragging a tipsy old man. 3.542. But since errors abound as to who this goddess is 3.543. I’m determined not to cloak her story. 3.544. Wretched Dido burned with love for Aeneas 3.545. She burned on the pyre built for her funeral: 3.546. Her ashes were gathered, and this brief couplet 3.547. Which she left, in dying, adorned her tomb: 3.548. AENEAS THE REASON, HIS THE BLADE EMPLOYED. 3.549. DIDO BY HER OWN HAND WAS DESTROYED. 3.550. The Numidians immediately invaded the defencele 3.551. Realm, and Iarbas the Moor captured and held the palace. 3.552. Remembering her scorn, he said: ‘See, I, whom she 3.553. So many times rejected, now enjoy Elissa’s marriage bed.’ 3.554. The Tyrians scattered, as each chanced to stray, as bee 3.555. often wander confusedly, having lost their Queen. 3.556. Anna, was driven from her home, weeping on leaving 3.557. Her sister’s city, after first paying honour to that sister. 3.558. The loose ashes drank perfume mixed with tears 3.559. And received an offering of her shorn hair: 3.560. Three times she said: ‘Farewell!’ three times lifted 3.561. And pressed the ashes to her lips, seeing her sister there. 3.562. Finding a ship, and companions for her flight, she glided 3.563. Away, looking back at the city, her sister’s sweet work. 3.564. There’s a fertile island, Melite, near barren Cosyra 3.565. Lashed by the waves of the Libyan sea. Trusting in 3.566. The king’s former hospitality, she headed there 3.567. Battus was king there, and was a wealthy host. 3.568. When he had learned the fates of the two sisters 3.569. He said: ‘This land, however small, is yours.’ 3.570. He would have been hospitable to the end 3.571. Except that he feared Pygmalion’s great power. 3.572. The corn had been taken to be threshed a third time 3.573. And a third time the new wine poured into empty vats. 3.574. The sun had twice circled the zodiac, and a third year 3.575. Was passing, when Anna had to find a fresh place of exile. 3.576. Her brother came seeking war. The king hated weapons 3.577. And said: ‘We are peaceable, flee for your own safety!’ 3.578. She fled at his command, gave her ship to the wind and waves: 3.579. Her brother was crueller than any ocean. 3.580. There’s a little field by the fish-filled stream 3.581. of stony Crathis: the local people call it Camere. 3.582. There she sailed, and when she was no further away 3.583. Than the distance reached by nine slingshots 3.584. The sails first fell and then flapped in the light breeze. 3.585. ‘Attack the water with oars!’ cried the captain. 3.586. And while they made ready to reef the sails 3.587. The swift South Wind struck the curved stern 3.588. And despite the captain’s efforts swept them 3.589. Into the open sea: the land was lost to sight. 3.590. The waves attacked them, and the ocean heaved 3.591. From the depths, and the hull gulped the foaming waters. 3.592. Skill is defeated by the wind, the steersman no longer 3.593. Guides the helm, but he too turns to prayer for aid. 3.594. The Phoenician exile is thrown high on swollen waves 3.595. And hides her weeping eyes in her robe: 3.596. Then for a first time she called her sister Dido happy 3.597. And whoever, anywhere, might be treading dry land. 3.598. A great gust drove the ship to the Laurentine shore 3.599. And, foundering, it perished, when all had landed. 3.600. Meanwhile pious Aeneas had gained Latinus’ realm 3.601. And his daughter too, and had merged both peoples. 3.602. While he was walking barefoot along the shore 3.603. That had been his dower, accompanied only by Achates 3.604. He saw Anna wandering, not believing it was her: 3.605. ‘Why should she be here in the fields of Latium?’ 3.606. Aeneas said to himself: ‘It’s Anna!’ shouted Achates: 3.607. At the sound of her name she raised her face. 3.608. Alas, what should she do? Flee? Wish for the ground 3.609. To swallow her? Her wretched sister’s fate was before her eyes. 3.610. The Cytherean hero felt her fear, and spoke to her 3.611. (He still wept, moved by your memory, Elissa): 3.612. ‘Anna, I swear, by this land that you once knew 3.613. A happier fate had granted me, and by the god 3.614. My companions, who have lately found a home here 3.615. That all of them often rebuked me for my delay. 3.616. Yet I did not fear her dying, that fear was absent. 3.617. Ah me! Her courage was beyond belief. 3.618. Don’t re-tell it: I saw shameful wounds on her body 3.619. When I dared to visit the houses of Tartarus. 3.620. But you shall enjoy the comforts of my kingdom 3.621. Whether your will or a god brings you to our shores. 3.622. I owe you much, and owe Elissa not a little: 3.623. You are welcome for your own and your sister’s sake.’ 3.624. She accepted his words (no other hope was left) 3.625. And told him of her own wanderings. 3.626. When she entered the palace, dressed in Tyrian style 3.627. Aeneas spoke (the rest of the throng were silent): 3.628. ‘Lavinia, my wife, I have a pious reason for entrusting 3.629. This lady to you: shipwrecked, I lived at her expense. 3.630. She’s of Tyrian birth: her kingdom’s on the Libyan shore: 3.631. I beg you to love her, as your dear sister.’ 3.632. Lavinia promised all, but hid a fancied wrong 3.633. Within her silent heart, and concealed her fears: 3.634. And though she saw many gifts given away openly 3.635. She suspected many more were sent secretly. 3.636. She hadn’t yet decided what to do: she hated 3.637. With fury, prepared a plan, and wished to die avenged. 3.638. It was night: it seemed her sister Dido stood 3.639. Before her bed, her straggling hair stained with her blood 3.640. Crying: ‘Flee, don’t hesitate, flee this gloomy house!’ 3.641. At the words a gust slammed the creaking door. 3.642. Anna leapt up, then jumped from a low window 3.643. To the ground: fear itself had made her daring. 3.644. With terror driving her, clothed in her loose vest 3.645. She runs like a frightened doe that hears the wolves. 3.646. It’s thought that horned Numicius swept her away 3.647. In his swollen flood, and hid her among his pools. 3.648. Meanwhile, shouting, they searched for the Sidonian lady 3.649. Through the fields: traces and tracks were visible: 3.650. Reaching the banks, they found her footprints there. 3.651. The knowing river stemmed his silent waters. 3.652. She herself appeared, saying: ‘I’m a nymph of the calm 3.653. Numicius: hid in perennial waters, Anna Perenna’s my name.’ 3.654. Quickly they set out a feast in the fields they’d roamed 3.655. And celebrated their deeds and the day, with copious wine. 3.656. Some think she’s the Moon, because she measures out 3.657. The year (annus): others, Themis, or the Inachian heifer. 3.658. Anna, you’ll find some to say you’re a nymph, daughter 3.659. of Azan, and gave Jupiter his first nourishment. 3.660. I’ll relate another tale that’s come to my ears 3.661. And it’s not so far away from the truth. 3.662. The Plebs of old, not yet protected by Tribunes 3.663. Fled, and gathered on the Sacred Mount: 3.664. The food supplies they’d brought with them failed 3.665. Also the stores of bread fit for human consumption. 3.666. There was a certain Anna from suburban Bovillae 3.667. A poor woman, old, but very industrious. 3.668. With her grey hair bound up in a light cap 3.669. She used to make coarse cakes with a trembling hand 3.670. And distribute them, still warm, among the people 3.671. Each morning: this supply of hers pleased them all. 3.672. When peace was made at home, they set up a statue 3.673. To Perenna, because she’d helped supply their needs. 3.674. Now it’s left for me to tell why the girls sing coarse songs: 3.675. Since they gather together to sing certain infamous things. 3.676. Anna had lately been made a goddess: Gradivus came to her 3.677. And taking her aside, spoke these words: 3.678. You honour my month: I’ve joined my season to yours: 3.679. I’ve great hopes you can do me a service. 3.680. Armed, I’m captivated by armed Minerva 3.681. I burn, and have nursed the wound for many a day. 3.682. Help us, alike in our pursuits, to become one: 3.683. The part suits you well, courteous old lady.’ 3.684. He spoke. She tricked the god with empty promises. 3.685. And led him on, in foolish hope, with false delays. 3.686. often, when he pressed her, she said: ‘I’ve done as you asked 3.687. She’s won, she’s yielded at last to your prayers.’ 3.688. The lover believed her and prepared the marriage-chamber. 3.689. They led Anna there, a new bride, her face veiled. 3.690. About to kiss her, Mars suddenly saw it was Anna: 3.691. Shame and anger alternating stirred the hoodwinked god. 3.692. The new goddess laughed at her dear Minerva’s lover. 3.693. Nothing indeed has ever pleased Venus more. 3.694. So now they tell old jokes, and coarse songs are sung 3.695. And they delight in how the great god was cheated. 3.696. I was about to neglect those daggers that pierced 3.697. Our leader, when Vesta spoke from her pure hearth: 3.698. Don’t hesitate to recall them: he was my priest 3.699. And those sacrilegious hands sought me with their blades. 3.700. I snatched him away, and left a naked semblance: 3.701. What died by the steel, was Caesar’s shadow.’ 3.702. Raised to the heavens he found Jupiter’s halls 3.703. And his is the temple in the mighty Forum. 3.704. But all the daring criminals who in defiance 3.705. of the gods, defiled the high priest’s head 3.706. Have fallen in merited death. Philippi is witness 3.707. And those whose scattered bones whiten its earth. 3.708. This work, this duty, was Augustus’ first task 3.709. Avenging his father by the just use of arms. 3.710. When the next dawn has revived the tender grass 4.377. It was the third day of the games (I recall), and a certain 4.378. Elderly man, who was sitting next to me at the show, said: 4.725. Indeed, I’ve often brought ashes of a calf, and stalk 4.726. of beans, in chaste purification, in my full hands: 4.727. Indeed, I’ve leapt the threefold line of flames 4.728. And the wet laurel’s sprinkled me with dew. 4.905. A white-robed throng blocked my road. 4.906. A priest was going to the grove of old Mildew (Robigo) 4.907. To offer the entrails of a dog and a sheep to the flames. 4.908. I went with him, so as not to be ignorant of the rite: 4.909. Your priest, Quirinus, pronounced these words: 4.910. ‘Scaly Mildew, spare the blades of corn 4.911. And let their tender tips quiver above the soil. 4.912. Let the crops grow, nurtured by favourable stars 4.913. Until they’re ready for the sickle. 4.914. Your power’s not slight: the corn you blight 4.915. The grieving farmer gives up for lost. 4.916. Wind and showers don’t harm the wheat as much 4.917. Nor gleaming frost that bleaches the yellow corn 4.918. As when the sun heats the moist stalks: 4.919. Then, dreadful goddess, is the time of your wrath. 4.920. Spare us, I pray, take your blighted hands from the harvest 4.921. And don’t harm the crop: it’s enough that you can harm. 4.922. Grip harsh iron rather than the tender wheat 4.923. Destroy whatever can destroy others first. 4.924. Better to gnaw at swords and harmful spears: 4.925. They’re not needed: the world’s at peace. 4.926. Let the rural wealth gleam now, rakes, sturdy hoes 4.927. And curved ploughshare: let rust stain weapons: 4.928. And whoever tries to draw his sword from its sheath 4.929. Let him feel it wedded there by long disuse. 4.930. Don’t you hurt the corn, and may the farmer’ 4.931. Prayer to you always be fulfilled by your absence.’ 4.932. He spoke: to his right there was a soft towel 4.933. And a cup of wine and an incense casket. 4.934. He offered the incense and wine on the hearth 4.935. Sheep’s entrails, and (I saw him) the foul guts of a vile dog. 4.936. Then the priest said: ‘You ask why we offer an odd sacrifice 4.937. In these rites’ (I had asked) ‘then learn the reason. 4.938. There’s a Dog they call Icarian, and when it rise 4.939. The dry earth is parched, and the crops ripen prematurely. 4.940. This dog is set on the altar to signify the starry one 4.941. And the only reason for it is because of the name.’ 4.942. When Aurora’s left Tithonus, kin to Phrygian Assaracus 5.131. Curius vowed them: but time destroys many things 5.132. And the long ages wear away the stone. 6.227. ‘Till the calm Tiber carries the sweepings from the shrine 6.228. of Ilian Vesta, on its yellow waves to the sea 6.229. I’m not allowed to comb my hair with a toothed comb 6.230. Nor to cut my nails with anything made of iron 6.231. Nor to touch my husband, though he’s Jove’s priest 6.232. And though he was given to me by law for life. 6.233. Don’t be in a hurry. Your daughter will be better wed 6.234. When Vesta’s fire gleams on purified earth.’
5. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.264-1.266, 2.589-2.623, 5.237, 7.54, 11.831, 12.189-12.194, 12.943, 12.948, 12.952 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.264. with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; 1.266. “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel 2.589. There we beheld the war-god unconfined; 2.590. The Greek besiegers to the roof-tops fled; 2.591. or, with shields tortoise-back, the gates assailed. 2.592. Ladders were on the walls; and round by round 2.593. up the huge bulwark as they fight their way 2.594. the shielded left-hand thwarts the falling spears 2.595. the right to every vantage closely clings. 2.596. The Trojans hurl whole towers and roof-tops down 2.597. upon the mounting foe; for well they see 2.598. that the last hour is come, and with what arms 2.599. the dying must resist. Rich gilded beams 2.600. with many a beauteous blazon of old time 2.601. go crashing down. Men armed with naked swords 2.603. Thus were our hearts inflamed to stand and strike 2.604. for the king's house, and to his body-guard 2.605. bring succor, and renew their vanquished powers. 2.606. A certain gate I knew, a secret way 2.607. which gave free passage between Priam's halls 2.608. and exit rearward; hither, in the days 2.609. before our fall, the lone Andromache 2.610. was wont with young Astyanax to pass 2.611. in quest of Priam and her husband's kin. 2.612. This way to climb the palace roof I flew 2.613. where, desperate, the Trojans with vain skill 2.614. hurled forth repellent arms. A tower was there 2.615. reared skyward from the roof-top, giving view 2.616. of Troy 's wide walls and full reconnaissance 2.617. of all Achaea 's fleets and tented field; 2.618. this, with strong steel, our gathered strength assailed 2.619. and as the loosened courses offered us 2.620. great threatening fissures, we uprooted it 2.621. from its aerial throne and thrust it down. 2.622. It fell with instantaneous crash of thunder 2.623. along the Danaan host in ruin wide. 5.237. he hurled poor, slack Menoetes from the poop 7.54. and all Hesperia gathered to the fray. 11.831. took flight and hurried far with loose-flung rein. 12.189. But Juno, peering from that summit proud 12.190. which is to-day the Alban (though that time 12.191. nor name nor fame the hallowed mountain knew) 12.192. urveyed the plain below and fair array 12.193. of Trojan and Laurentine, by the walls 12.194. of King Latinus. Whereupon straightway 12.943. unlingering tried, all lesser task laid by 12.948. his forehead of triumphant snow. All eyes 12.952. were battering the foundations, now laid by
6. Silius Italicus, Punica, 1.32, 1.38-1.39, 2.296, 8.50, 8.108-8.111, 8.131-8.133, 8.209, 8.217, 10.337-10.371, 12.691-12.730, 15.384-15.385, 16.684-16.685, 17.616-17.617 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 6.439 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acca larentia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
adultery, mime Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
aeneas Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103, 210
aetiology Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
ancilla Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
anger Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
anna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210, 215
anna perenna, cult of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
anna perenna Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
anna perenna (festival) Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
antiquarianism Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
antium, latium Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
asterius the sophist of cappadocia Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
athena Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
athenaeus, on festivals, hymns Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
augustan ideology of time Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
augustus, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
bovillae, perenna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103, 215
calendar, roman, and latin calendars as source for fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
calendars, fasti Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
camilla Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
cannae Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
carthage Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
comedy, roman Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
dance/dancers, nonelite women at festivals Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
dido Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210, 215
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103, 210
epigraphic boom, Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
etiology, and antiquarianism' Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
fasti Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
fasti antiates maiores Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
fear, and hope ( spes ) Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
fear, weaponization of Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
festivals, roman Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
hamilcar Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, and aeneas Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, and medea Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, as anti-aeneas Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, as jason Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, fear-mongering Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, feminized Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, ira Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, politically impotent Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, tyrant Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hector Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
home Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210, 215
homer, iliad Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
homer, odyssey Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
hymns, festivals Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
juno, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
juno, pun. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
jupiter, pun. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
laberius, decimus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
larentalia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
lares Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
lavinia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103, 210
lemuria Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
lena Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
mars Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
medea, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
metus hannibalis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
mime, adultery mime Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
minerva Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
nausicaa Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
notation, music Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
ovid, on the festival of anna perenna Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
pallas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
plautus, casina Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
praeneste, palestrina, latium Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
pygmalion (in the a.) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
romaea Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 263
roman senate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
rome Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
sacrifices Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
scipio africanus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
shipwreck Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
suitors Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
tauromenium, sicily Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
tiber Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
tituli sacri Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
trasimene, lake Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
troy Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
turnus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
tyrant, political impotence Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
umbra Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
underworld Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103
varro, m. terentius, influence of on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
venus, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
venus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 215
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 103, 210
verrius flaccus, influence on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 35
verrius flaccus Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
votive inscriptions, rome, italy Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 403
wolf/wolves Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 210
zama Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92