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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 3.183-3.188


quae fuerit nostri, si quaeris, regia natiIf you ask where my son’s palace was


aspice de canna straminibusque domum.See there, that house made of straw and reeds.


in stipula placidi capiebat munera somniHe snatched the gifts of peaceful sleep on straw


et tamen ex illo venit in astra toro.Yet from that same low bed he rose to the stars.


iamque loco maius nomen Romanus habebatAlready the Roman’s name extended beyond his city


nec coniunx illi nec socer ullus erat.Though he possessed neither wife nor father-in-law.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.88 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.88. Suppose a traveller to carry into Scythia or Britain the orrery recently constructed by our friend Posidonius, which at each revolution reproduces the same motions of the sun, the moon and the five planets that take place in the heavens every twenty-four hundred, would any single native doubt that this orrery was the work of a rational being? This thinkers however raise doubts about the world itself from which all things arise and have their being, and debate whether it is the produce of chance or necessity of some sort, or of divine reason and intelligence; they think more highly of the achievement of Archimedes in making a model of the revolutions of the firmament than of that of nature in creating them, although the perfection of the original shows a craftsmanship many times as great as does the counterfeit.
2. Cicero, Republic, 1.21-1.22, 2.12-2.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.21. Tum Philus: Nihil novi vobis adferam, neque quod a me sit cogitatum aut inventum; nam memoria teneo C. Sulpicium Gallum, doctissimum, ut scitis, hominem, cum idem hoc visum diceretur et esset casu apud M. Marcellum, qui cum eo consul fuerat, sphaeram, quam M. Marcelli avus captis Syracusis ex urbe locupletissima atque ornatissima sustulisset, cum aliud nihil ex tanta praeda domum suam deportavisset, iussisse proferri; cuius ego sphaerae cum persaepe propter Archimedi gloriam nomen audissem, speciem ipsam non sum tanto opere admiratus; erat enim illa venustior et nobilior in volgus, quam ab eodem Archimede factam posuerat in templo Virtutis Marcellus idem. 1.22. Sed posteaquam coepit rationem huius operis scientissime Gallus exponere, plus in illo Siculo ingenii, quam videretur natura humana ferre potuisse, iudicavi fuisse. Dicebat enim Gallus sphaerae illius alterius solidae atque plenae vetus esse inventum, et eam a Thalete Milesio primum esse tornatam, post autem ab Eudoxo Cnidio, discipulo, ut ferebat, Platonis, eandem illam astris stellisque, quae caelo inhaererent, esse descriptam; cuius omnem ornatum et descriptionem sumptam ab Eudoxo multis annis post non astrologiae scientia, sed poetica quadam facultate versibus Aratum extulisse. Hoc autem sphaerae genus, in quo solis et lunae motus inessent et earum quinque stellarum, quae errantes et quasi vagae nominarentur, in illa sphaera solida non potuisse finiri, atque in eo admirandum esse inventum Archimedi, quod excogitasset, quem ad modum in dissimillimis motibus inaequabiles et varios cursus servaret una conversio. Hanc sphaeram Gallus cum moveret, fiebat, ut soli luna totidem conversionibus in aere illo, quot diebus in ipso caelo, succederet, ex quo et in caelo sphaera solis fieret eadem illa defectio et incideret luna tum in eam metam, quae esset umbra terrae, cum sol e regione 2.12. Atque haec quidem perceleriter confecit; nam et urbem constituit, quam e suo nomine Romam iussit nominari, et ad firmandam novam civitatem novum quoddam et subagreste consilium, sed ad muniendas opes regni ac populi sui magni hominis et iam tum longe providentis secutus est, cum Sabinas honesto ortas loco virgines, quae Romam ludorum gratia venissent, quos tum primum anniversarios in circo facere instituisset, Consualibus rapi iussit easque in familiarum amplissimarum matrimoniis collocavit. 2.13. Qua ex causa cum bellum Romanis Sabini intulissent proeliique certamen varium atque anceps fuisset, cum T. Tatio, rege Sabinorum, foedus icit matronis ipsis, quae raptae erant, orantibus; quo foedere et Sabinos in civitatem adscivit sacris conmunicatis et regnum suum cum illorum rege sociavit. 2.14. Post interitum autem Tatii cum ad eum dominatus omnis reccidisset, quamquam cum Tatio in regium consilium delegerat principes (qui appellati sunt propter caritatem patres) populumque et suo et Tatii nomine et Lucumonis, qui Romuli socius in Sabino proelio occiderat, in tribus tris curiasque triginta discripserat (quas curias earum nominibus nuncupavit, quae ex Sabinis virgines raptae postea fuerant oratrices pacis et foederis)—sed quamquam ea Tatio sic erant discripta vivo, tamen eo interfecto multo etiam magis Romulus patrum auctoritate consilioque regnavit.
3. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.159, 5.163-5.165 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.79.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.79.11.  But their life was that of herdsmen, and they lived by their own labour, generally upon the mountains in huts which they built, roofs and all, out of sticks and reeds. One of these, called the hut of Romulus, remained even to my day on the flank of the Palatine hill which faces towards the Circus, and it is preserved holy by those who have charge of these matters; they add nothing to it to render it more stately, but if any part of it is injured, either by storms or by the lapse of time, they repair the damage and restore the hut as nearly as possible to its former condition.
5. Livy, History, 1.9-1.13, 1.48.6-1.48.7, 1.58.5, 10.23.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 1.199, 3.167, 3.170, 3.177, 3.184-3.188, 3.218, 6.277-6.280, 6.609-6.610 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.167. ‘If it’s right for the secret promptings of the god 3.184. See there, that house made of straw and reeds. 3.185. He snatched the gifts of peaceful sleep on straw 3.186. Yet from that same low bed he rose to the stars. 3.187. Already the Roman’s name extended beyond his city 3.188. Though he possessed neither wife nor father-in-law. 6.277. There’s a globe suspended, enclosed by Syracusan art 6.278. That’s a small replica of the vast heavens 6.279. And the Earth’s equidistant from top and bottom. 6.280. Which is achieved by its spherical shape. 6.609. ‘Go on, or do you seek the bitter fruits of virtue? 6.610. Drive the unwilling wheels, I say, over his face.’
7. Sallust, Catiline, 10.4, 10.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 1.6.4 (1st cent. BCE

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.654 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence
10. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 2.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Plutarch, Romulus, 15, 19-20, 14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Suetonius, Augustus, 7.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Tacitus, Annals, 13.58 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13.58.  In the same year, the tree in the Comitium, known as the Ruminalis, which eight hundred and thirty years earlier had sheltered the infancy of Remus and Romulus, through the death of its boughs and the withering of its stem, reached a stage of decrepitude which was regarded as a portent, until it renewed its verdure in fresh shoots.
14. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 48.43.4, 56.34.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

48.43.4.  Now many events of a portentous nature had occurred even before this, such as the spouting of olive oil on the bank of the Tiber, and many also at this time. Thus the hut of Romulus was burned as a result of some ritual which the pontifices were performing in it; a statue of Virtus, which stood before one of the gates, fell upon its face, and certain persons, becoming inspired by the Mother of the Gods, declared that the goddess was angry with them. 56.34.2.  This image was borne from the palace by the officials elected for the following year, and another of gold from the senate-house, and still another upon a triumphal chariot. Behind these came the images of his ancestors and of his deceased relatives (except that of Caesar, because he had been numbered among the demigods) and those of other Romans who had been prominent in any way, beginning with Romulus himself.
15. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 5.6.3-5.6.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Elagabalus, 3.4, 6.9 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agrippina the younger, nero murders Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
alexandria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
alsop, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
athenaeus, on the museion at alexandria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
athens Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
augustus, and romulus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
bennett, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
cicero Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
dionysus of halicarnassus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
divine honours Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
festivals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
foucault, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
founder, of rome Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
frugalitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
funeral Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
heroön Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
horatia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
julius caesar, new romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
livy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
lucretia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
museum, as an agent for social control Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
museum, modern theories of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
numa Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
ogulnius gallus, cn. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
ogulnius gallus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
palatine Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
pearce, s. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
phidias Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
plutarch Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
rape Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
rome, area capitolina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, burns Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, casa romuli Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, casa romuli on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, clivus orbius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
rome, comitium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, esquiline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
rome, ficus ruminalis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, palatine hill, casa romuli on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, palatine hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
rome, temple of fortuna huiusce diei Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
rome, temple of jupiter stator Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
rome, the arx Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
romulus, his tomb Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
sabine, and marriage Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
sabines as austere, women rape of Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
servius tullius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
stocking, g. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
tanaquil Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
tullius cicero, m., and the de finibus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
tullius cicero, m., his oration against catiline Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 23
tyranny, tyrant Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 116
virtus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
vitruvius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 166
women and girls, as objects and subjects' Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146
women and girls Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 146