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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 3.155-3.162


sed tamen errabant etiam nunc tempora, donecBut the calendar was still erratic down to the time


Caesaris in multis haec quoque cura fuit.When Caesar took it, and many other things, in hand.


non haec ille deus tantaeque propaginis auctorThat god, the founder of a mighty house, did not


credidit officiis esse minora suisRegard the matter as beneath his attention


promissumque sibi voluit praenoscere caelumAnd wished to have prescience of those heaven


nec deus ignotas hospes inire domosPromised him, not be an unknown god entering a strange house.


ille moras solis, quibus in sua signa rediretHe is said to have drawn up an exact table


traditur exactis disposuisse notis.Of the periods in which the sun returns to its previous signs.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.62-1.69, 1.72-1.73, 1.78-1.79 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Ovid, Fasti, 1.14, 1.27-1.44, 1.295-1.310, 3.73-3.78, 3.85-3.98, 3.101-3.102, 3.111-3.112, 3.121-3.126, 3.143, 3.151-3.154, 3.156-3.167, 3.259-3.392, 3.697-3.708, 4.23-4.60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.14. And those days that he added to the sacred rites. 1.27. When Rome’s founder established the calendar 1.28. He determined there’d be ten months in every year. 1.29. You knew more about swords than stars, Romulus, surely 1.30. Since conquering neighbours was your chief concern. 1.31. Yet there’s a logic that might have possessed him 1.32. Caesar, and that might well justify his error. 1.33. He held that the time it takes for a mother’s womb 1.34. To produce a child, was sufficient for his year. 1.35. For as many months also, after her husband’s funeral 1.36. A widow maintains signs of mourning in her house. 1.37. So Quirinus in his ceremonial robes had that in view 1.38. When he decreed his year to an unsophisticated people. 1.39. Mars’ month, March, was the first, and Venus’ April second: 1.40. She was the mother of the race, and he its father. 1.41. The third month May took its name from the old (maiores) 1.42. The fourth, June, from the young (iuvenes), the rest were numbered. 1.43. But Numa did not neglect Janus and the ancestral shades 1.44. And therefore added two months to the ancient ten. 1.295. What prevents me speaking of the stars, and their rising 1.296. And setting? That was a part of what I’ve promised. 1.297. Happy minds that first took the trouble to consider 1.298. These things, and to climb to the celestial regions! 1.299. We can be certain that they raised their head 1.300. Above the failings and the homes of men, alike. 1.301. Neither wine nor lust destroyed their noble natures 1.302. Nor public business nor military service: 1.303. They were not seduced by trivial ambitions 1.304. Illusions of bright glory, nor hunger for great wealth. 1.305. They brought the distant stars within our vision 1.306. And subjected the heavens to their genius. 1.307. So we reach the sky: there’s no need for Ossa to be piled 1.308. On Olympus, or Pelion’s summit touch the highest stars. 1.309. Following these masters I too will measure out the skies 1.310. And attribute the wheeling signs to their proper dates. 3.97. In order to take precedence over all these, at least 3.98. Romulus gave the first month to the father of his race. 3.101. Greece, defeated had not yet transmitted her art 3.102. To the conquerors, her people eloquent but not brave. 3.111. The stars then ran their course, freely, unobserved 3.112. Each year: yet everyone held them to be gods. 3.121. A year was when the moon returned to full for the tenth time: 3.122. And that was a number that was held in high honour: 3.123. Because it’s the number of fingers we usually count with 3.124. Or because a woman produces in ten months 3.125. Or because the numerals ascend from one to ten 3.126. And from that point we begin a fresh interval. 3.143. Also, it’s said, a new fire is lit at her secret shrine 3.151. Numa Pompilius, led to Rome from the lands of olives 3.152. Was the first to realise the year lacked two months 3.153. Learning it from Pythagoras of Samos, who believed 3.154. We could be reborn, or was taught it by his own Egeria. 3.156. When Caesar took it, and many other things, in hand. 3.157. That god, the founder of a mighty house, did not 3.158. Regard the matter as beneath his attention 3.159. And wished to have prescience of those heaven 3.160. Promised him, not be an unknown god entering a strange house. 3.161. He is said to have drawn up an exact table 3.162. of the periods in which the sun returns to its previous signs. 3.163. He added sixty-five days to three hundred 3.164. And then added a fifth part of a whole day. 3.165. That’s the measure of the year: one day 3.166. The sum of the five part-days is added to each lustre. 3.167. ‘If it’s right for the secret promptings of the god 3.259. Celestial weapons, and sing of Mamurius. 3.260. Teach me, nymph, who serves Diana’s lake and grove: 3.261. Nymph, Egeria, wife to Numa, speak of your actions. 3.262. There is a lake in the vale of Aricia, ringed by dense woods 3.263. And sacred to religion from ancient times. 3.264. Here Hippolytus hides, who was torn to piece 3.265. By his horses, and so no horse may enter the grove. 3.266. The long hedge is covered with hanging threads 3.267. And many tablets witness the goddess’s merit. 3.268. often a woman whose prayer is answered, brow wreathed 3.269. With garlands, carries lighted torches from the City. 3.270. One with strong hands and swift feet rules there 3.271. And each is later killed, as he himself killed before. 3.272. A pebble-filled stream flows down with fitful murmurs: 3.273. often I’ve drunk there, but in little draughts. 3.274. Egeria, goddess dear to the Camenae, supplies the water: 3.275. She who was wife and counsellor to Numa. 3.276. The Quirites were too prompt to take up arms 3.281. And citizens were ashamed to fight each other: 3.282. Those who had once been violent were transformed, on seeing 3.291. Can teach you the rites of expiation. But they won’t 3.292. Teach them unless compelled: so catch and bind them.’ 3.293. And she revealed the arts by which they could be caught. 3.294. There was a grove, dark with holm-oaks, below the Aventine 3.295. At sight of which you would say: ‘There’s a god within.’ 3.296. The centre was grassy, and covered with green moss 3.297. And a perennial stream of water trickled from the rock. 3.298. Faunus and Picus used to drink there alone. 3.299. Numa approached and sacrificed a sheep to the spring 3.300. And set out cups filled with fragrant wine. 3.301. Then he hid with his people inside the cave. 3.302. The woodland spirits came to their usual spring 3.303. And quenched their dry throats with draughts of wine. 3.304. Sleep succeeded wine: Numa emerged from the icy cave 3.305. And clasped the sleepers’ hands in tight shackles. 3.306. When sleep vanished, they fought and tried to burst 3.307. Their bonds, which grew tighter the more they struggled. 3.308. Then Numa spoke: ‘Gods of the sacred groves, if you accept 3.309. My thoughts were free of wickedness, forgive my actions: 3.310. And show me how the lightning may be averted.’ 3.311. So Numa: and, shaking his horns, so Faunus replied: 3.312. ‘You seek great things, that it’s not right for you to know 3.313. Through our admission: our powers have their limits. 3.314. We are rural gods who rule in the high mountains: 3.315. Jupiter has control of his own weapons. 3.316. You could never draw him from heaven by yourself 3.317. But you may be able, by making use of our aid.’ 3.318. Faunus spoke these words: Picus too agreed 3.319. ‘But remove our shackles,’ Picus added: 3.320. ‘Jupiter will arrive here, drawn by powerful art. 3.321. Cloudy Styx will be witness to my promise.’ 3.322. It’s wrong for men to know what the gods enacted when loosed 3.323. From the snare, or what spells they spoke, or by what art 3.324. They drew Jupiter from his realm above. My song will sing 3.325. of lawful things, such as a poet may speak with pious lips. 3.326. The drew you (eliciunt) from the sky, Jupiter, and later 3.327. Generations now worship you, by the name of Elicius. 3.328. It’s true that the crowns of the Aventine woods trembled 3.329. And the earth sank under the weight of Jove. 3.330. The king’s heart shook, the blood fled from his body 3.331. And the bristling hair stood up stiffly on his head. 3.332. When he regained his senses, he said: ‘King and father 3.333. To the high gods, if I have touched your offering 3.334. With pure hands, and if a pious tongue, too, asks for 3.335. What I seek, grant expiation from your lightning,’ 3.336. The god accepted his prayer, but hid the truth with deep 3.337. Ambiguities, and terrified him with confusing words. 3.338. ‘Sever a head,’ said the god: the king replied; ‘I will 3.339. We’ll sever an onion’s, dug from my garden.’ 3.340. The god added: ‘of a man’: ‘You’ll have the hair,’ 3.341. Said the king. He demanded a life, Numa replied: ‘A fish’s’. 3.342. The god laughed and said: ‘Expiate my lightning like this 3.343. O man who cannot be stopped from speaking with gods. 3.344. And when Apollo’s disc is full tomorrow 3.345. I’ll give you sure pledges of empire.’ 3.346. He spoke, and was carried above the quaking sky 3.362. The king stood, his head covered with a white cloth 3.391. Ancient work, and now call out ‘Mamurius’. 3.697. Our leader, when Vesta spoke from her pure hearth: 3.698. Don’t hesitate to recall them: he was my priest 3.699. And those sacrilegious hands sought me with their blades. 3.700. I snatched him away, and left a naked semblance: 3.701. What died by the steel, was Caesar’s shadow.’ 3.702. Raised to the heavens he found Jupiter’s halls 3.703. And his is the temple in the mighty Forum. 3.704. But all the daring criminals who in defiance 3.705. of the gods, defiled the high priest’s head 3.706. Have fallen in merited death. Philippi is witness 3.707. And those whose scattered bones whiten its earth. 3.708. This work, this duty, was Augustus’ first task 4.23. When Romulus established the length of the year 4.24. He recognised this, and commemorated your sires: 4.25. And as he granted first place among months to fierce Mars 4.26. Being the immediate cause of his own existence 4.27. So he granted the second month to Venus 4.28. Tracing his descent from her through many generations: 4.29. Searching for the roots of his race, unwinding the roll 4.30. of the centuries, he came at last to his divine kin. 4.31. He couldn’t be ignorant that Electra daughter of Atla 4.32. Bore Dardanus, that Electra had slept with Jove. 4.33. From Dardanus came Ericthonius, and from himTros: 4.34. He in turn produced Assaracus, and Assaracus Capys. 4.35. Next was Anchises, with whom Venu 4.36. Didn’t disdain to share the name of parent. 4.37. From them came Aeneas, whose piety was seen, carrying 4.38. Holy things, and a father as holy, on his shoulders, through the fire. 4.39. Now at last we come to the fortunate name of Iulus 4.40. Through whom the Julian house claims Teucrian ancestors. 4.41. Postumus was his, called Silvius among the Latin 4.42. Race, being born in the depth of the woods. 4.43. He was your father, Latinus. Alba followed Latinus: 4.44. Epytus was next to take your titles Alba. 4.45. Epytus gave his son Capys a Trojan name 4.46. And the same was your grandfather Calpetus. 4.47. When Tiberinus ruled his father’s kingdom after him 4.48. It’s said he drowned in a deep pool of the Tuscan river. 4.49. But before that he saw the birth of a son Agrippa 4.50. And a grandson Remulus, who was struck by lightning. 4.51. Aventinus followed them, from whom the place and the hill 4.52. Took their name. After him the realm passed to Proca. 4.53. He was succeeded by Numitor, brother to harsh Amulius. 4.54. Ilia and Lausus were then the children of Numitor. 4.55. Lausus fell to his uncle’s sword: Ilia pleased Mars 4.56. And bore you Quirinus, and your brother Remus. 4.57. You always claimed your parents were Mars and Venus 4.58. And deserved to be believed when you said so: 4.59. And you granted successive months to your race’s gods 4.60. So your descendants might not be in ignorance of the truth.
3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.752-15.758, 15.839-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 6.849-6.853 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests
5. Vergil, Georgics, 2.475-2.540 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.475. So scathe it, as the flocks with venom-bite 2.476. of their hard tooth, whose gnawing scars the stem. 2.477. For no offence but this to Bacchus bleed 2.478. The goat at every altar, and old play 2.479. Upon the stage find entrance; therefore too 2.480. The sons of Theseus through the country-side— 2.481. Hamlet and crossway—set the prize of wit 2.482. And on the smooth sward over oiled skin 2.483. Dance in their tipsy frolic. Furthermore 2.484. The Ausonian swains, a race from placeName key= 2.485. Make merry with rough rhymes and boisterous mirth 2.486. Grim masks of hollowed bark assume, invoke 2.487. Thee with glad hymns, O Bacchus, and to thee 2.488. Hang puppet-faces on tall pines to swing. 2.489. Hence every vineyard teems with mellowing fruit 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 2.495. Led by the horn shall at the altar stand 2.496. Whose entrails rich on hazel-spits we'll roast. 2.497. This further task again, to dress the vine 2.498. Hath needs beyond exhausting; the whole soil 2.499. Thrice, four times, yearly must be cleft, the sod 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.502. Round on the labourer spins the wheel of toil 2.503. As on its own track rolls the circling year. 2.504. Soon as the vine her lingering leaves hath shed 2.505. And the chill north wind from the forests shook 2.506. Their coronal, even then the careful swain 2.507. Looks keenly forward to the coming year 2.508. With Saturn's curved fang pursues and prune 2.509. The vine forlorn, and lops it into shape. 2.510. Be first to dig the ground up, first to clear 2.511. And burn the refuse-branches, first to house 2.512. Again your vine-poles, last to gather fruit. 2.513. Twice doth the thickening shade beset the vine 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.516. Broad acres, farm but few. Rough twigs beside 2.517. of butcher's broom among the woods are cut 2.518. And reeds upon the river-banks, and still 2.519. The undressed willow claims thy fostering care. 2.520. So now the vines are fettered, now the tree 2.521. Let go the sickle, and the last dresser now 2.522. Sings of his finished rows; but still the ground 2.523. Must vexed be, the dust be stirred, and heaven 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 2.526. Nor look for sickle bowed or biting rake 2.527. When once they have gripped the soil, and borne the breeze. 2.528. Earth of herself, with hooked fang laid bare 2.529. Yields moisture for the plants, and heavy fruit 2.530. The ploughshare aiding; therewithal thou'lt rear 2.531. The olive's fatness well-beloved of Peace. 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apotheosis, roman, dynamics of Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 171
aratus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
astrology Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
astronomical preface, calendar-builders as duces in Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75, 76
astronomical preface, literary precedents of Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75
astronomy, in anchises creed Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
augustan ideology of time Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 68, 69
augustus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126; Walter, Time in Ancient Stories of Origin (2020) 181
caesar, c. julius, as calendar-builder Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 68, 69
caesar (g. iulius caesar), catasterism of Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 171
caesar (g. iulius caesar), divinity won through earthly achievements and / or divine agency Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 171
caesars comet Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 171
calendar, roman, and social control Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 68, 69
calendar, roman, as controlling the stars Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 68, 69
calendar, roman, julian and augustan revisions to Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 68, 69
de architectura (vitruvius) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 171
deification, and journey to the stars motif Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76
deification, of augustus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75, 76
deification, of caesar Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75, 76
fasti (ovid) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 171
julius caesar, c. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
jupiter Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
lucretius, influence of on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75, 76
metamorphoses (ovid) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 171
numa, as calendar-builder Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 68, 69
ovid Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
pythagoras as numas teacher Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
romulus, as calendar-builder Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 69
stoicism Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
translation' Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
tullius cicero, m. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 126
vergil, influence of georgics on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75