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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 2.319-2.324


dat tenuis tunicas Gaetulo murice tinctasShe gave him thin vests dyed in Gaetulian purple


dat teretem zonam, qua modo cincta fuit.Gave him the elegant zone that had bound her waist.


ventre minor zona est; tunicarum vincla relaxatThe zone was too small for his belly, and he unfastened


ut posset magnas exeruisse manusThe clasps of the vests to thrust out his great hands.


fregerat armillas non illa ad brachia factasHe fractured her bracelets, not made for such arms


scindebant magni vincula parva pedes.And his giant feet split the little shoes.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 167-173, 166 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

166. And dreadful battles vanquished some of these
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 216, 274-275, 215 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

215. Her then as Aphrodite, Nursed Around
3. Homer, Iliad, 4.141 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.141. /and forthwith the dark blood flowed from the wound.As when a woman staineth ivory with scarlet, some woman of Maeonia or Caria, to make a cheek-piece for horses, and it lieth in a treasure-chamber, though many horsemen pray to wear it; but it lieth there as a king's treasure
4. Homer, Odyssey, 4.561-4.568 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Odes, 3.14.13-3.14.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Amores, 1.5.9-1.5.14, 1.7.47-1.7.48, 3.1.7-3.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.31-1.32, 2.297-2.302, 3.169-3.192, 3.273 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Fasti, 1.129-1.130, 1.405-1.410, 2.3-2.4, 2.47-2.54, 2.59, 2.61, 2.122, 2.127-2.148, 2.153-2.192, 2.267-2.318, 2.320-2.380, 2.411, 2.425-2.429, 2.441, 2.443-2.446, 3.291-3.292, 3.429-3.430, 3.435-3.436, 3.601, 3.633-3.638, 3.657-3.668, 4.91-4.114, 4.865-4.866, 6.251-6.256, 6.319-6.344 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.129. With salt: on his sacrificial lips I’m Patulcius 1.130. And then again I’m called Clusius. 1.405. There were Naiads too, some with uncombed flowing hair 1.406. Others with their tresses artfully bound. 1.407. One attends with tunic tucked high above the knee 1.408. Another shows her breast through her loosened robe: 1.409. One bares her shoulder: another trails her hem in the grass 1.410. Their tender feet are not encumbered with shoes. 2.47. Yet (lest you err, through ignorance of their old order) 2.48. Though January is the first month, and was before 2.49. February that follows was once last in the ancient year. 2.50. And your worship, Terminus, closed the sacred rites. 2.51. The month of Janus came first, being the entrance (janua): 2.52. This month was last, sacred to the last rites of the dead. 2.53. Afterwards the Decemvirs are thought to have brought together 2.54. These months that had been parted by a wide interval of time. 2.59. All the rest would have similarly fallen in ruins 2.61. Under whose rule the shrines are untouched by age: 2.127. Sacred Father of the Country, this title has been conferred 2.128. On you, by the senate, the people, and by us, the knights. 2.129. Events had already granted it. Tardily you received 2.130. Your true title, you’d long been Father of the World. 2.131. You have on earth the name that Jupiter owns to 2.132. In high heaven: you are father of men, he of gods. 2.133. Romulus, give way: Caesar by his care makes your wall 2.134. Mighty: you made such as Remus could leap across. 2.138. Caesar possesses all beneath Jupiter’s heavens. 2.139. You raped married women: under Caesar they are ordered 2.140. To be chaste: you permitted the guilty your grove: he forbids them. 2.141. Force was acceptable to you: under Caesar the laws flourish. 2.142. You had the title Master: he bears the name of Prince. 2.143. Remus accused you, while he pardons his enemies. 2.144. Your father deified you: he deified his father. 2.146. And pours the gods flowing nectar mixed with water 2.153. On the third night, you will see straight away 2.154. That the Bear Keeper Bootes’ feet have emerged. 2.155. Callisto was one of the Hamadryads, among 2.156. The sacred band of the huntress Diana. 2.157. She laid her hand on the goddess’ bow, saying: 2.158. ‘Bear witness, bow I touch, to my virginity.’ 2.159. Cynthia praised the vow: ‘Keep faith with that 2.160. And you will be first among my companions.’ 2.161. She’d have kept her vow, if she’d not been beautiful: 2.162. She was wary of men, but sinned with Jupiter. 2.163. Phoebe had hunted many creatures through the woods 2.164. And was returning home at noon, or shortly after. 2.165. As she reached a grove (a dense grove dark with holm-oak 2.166. With a deep fount of cool water at its centre) 2.167. She said: ‘Arcadian virgin, let’s bathe here in the woods.’ 2.168. The girl blushed at the false title of virgin. 2.169. Diana spoke to the nymphs, and they undressed. 2.170. Callisto was ashamed, and gave bashful signs of delay. 2.171. Removing her tunic, her swollen belly 2.172. Gave clear witness to the burden she carried. 2.173. The goddess spoke to her, saying: ‘Daughter of Lycaon 2.174. Oath-breaker, leave the virgin band, do not defile pure waters.’ 2.175. Ten times the moon completed her full orb 2.176. When she, thought to be virgin, became a mother. 2.177. Juno, wounded, raged, and altered the girl’s form. 2.178. What would you? Jupiter had ravished her against her will. 2.179. And seeing in his victim a shameful animal face 2.180. Juno said: ‘Let Jupiter enjoy her embraces now!’ 2.181. She who had been loved by highest Jove 2.182. Roamed the wild mountains as a shaggy she-bear. 2.183. The boy she conceived furtively was adolescent 2.184. When the mother met the child she had born. 2.185. She reared, wildly, and growled, as if she knew him: 2.186. Growling was his mother’s only mode of speech. 2.187. The boy, unknowing, would have pierced her with his sharp spear 2.188. But they were both caught up into the heavenly mansions. 2.189. They shine as neighbouring constellations: first the Bear 2.190. Then the Bear-keeper takes shape behind her back. 2.191. Still, Juno, Saturn’s daughter, rages and begs grey Tethy 2.192. Never to wash the Maenalian Bear with her waters. 2.281. So we worship the god, and the priest perform 2.282. The rites the Pelasgians brought in the ancient way. 2.305. By chance Tirynthian Hercules was walking with Omphale 2.306. His mistress, and Faunus saw them from a high ridge. 2.307. He saw and burned. ‘Mountain spirits,’ he said 2.308. ‘No more of your company: she will be my passion.’ 2.309. As the Maeonian girl went by her fragrant hair streamed 2.310. Over her shoulders, her breast was bright with gold: 2.311. A gilded parasol protected her from warm sunlight 2.312. One Herculean hands, indeed, held over her. 2.313. Now she came to Bacchus’ grove, and Tmolus’ vineyard 2.314. While dew-wet Hesperus rode his dusky steed. 2.315. She entered a cave roofed with tufa and natural rock 2.316. And there was a babbling stream at its entrance. 2.317. While her attendants were preparing food and wine 2.318. She clothed Hercules in her own garments. 2.320. Gave him the elegant zone that had bound her waist. 2.321. The zone was too small for his belly, and he unfastened 2.322. The clasps of the vests to thrust out his great hands. 2.323. He fractured her bracelets, not made for such arms 2.324. And his giant feet split the little shoes. 2.325. She took up his heavy club, and the lion’s pelt 2.326. And those lesser weapons lodged in their quiver. 2.327. So dressed, they feasted, and gave themselves to sleep 2.328. Resting on separate couches set next to one another 2.329. Because they were preparing to celebrate the rite 2.330. of the discoverer of the vine, with purity, at dawn. 2.331. It was midnight. What will unruly love not dare? 2.332. Faunus came through the dark to the dewy cave 2.333. And seeing the servants lost in drunken slumber 2.334. Had hopes of their master also being fast asleep. 2.335. Entering, as a reckless lover, he roamed around 2.336. Following his cautious outstretched hands. 2.337. He reached the couches spread as beds, by touch 2.338. And this first omen of the future was bright. 2.339. When he felt the bristling tawny lion-skin 2.340. However, he drew back his hand in terror 2.341. And recoiled, frozen with fear, as a traveller, troubled 2.342. Will draw back his foot on seeing a snake. 2.343. Then he touched the soft coverings of the next couch 2.344. And its deceptive feel misled him. 2.345. He climbed in, and reclined on the bed’s near side 2.346. And his swollen cock was harder than horn. 2.347. But pulling up the lower hem of the tunic 2.348. The legs there were bristling with thick coarse hair. 2.349. The Tirynthian hero fiercely repelled another attempt 2.350. And down fell Faunus from the heights of the couch. 2.351. At the noise, Omphale called for her servants, and light: 2.352. Torches appeared, and events became clear. 2.353. Faunus groaned from his heavy fall from the high couch 2.354. And could barely lift his limbs from the hard ground. 2.355. Hercules laughed, as did all who saw him lying there 2.356. And the Lydian girl laughed too, at her lover. 2.357. Betrayed by his clothing: so the god hates clothe 2.358. That trick the eye, and calls the naked to his rites. 2.411. There was a tree: traces remain, which is now called 3.291. Can teach you the rites of expiation. But they won’t 3.292. Teach them unless compelled: so catch and bind them.’ 3.429. The temple of Veiovis was consecrated today before the two groves. 3.430. When Romulus ringed his grove with a high stone wall 3.435. Learn who this god is, and why he is so called. 3.436. He is the young Jupiter: see his youthful face: 3.601. And his daughter too, and had merged both peoples. 3.633. Within her silent heart, and concealed her fears: 3.634. And though she saw many gifts given away openly 3.635. She suspected many more were sent secretly. 3.636. She hadn’t yet decided what to do: she hated 3.637. With fury, prepared a plan, and wished to die avenged. 3.638. It was night: it seemed her sister Dido stood 3.657. The year (annus): others, Themis, or the Inachian heifer. 3.658. Anna, you’ll find some to say you’re a nymph, daughter 3.659. of Azan, and gave Jupiter his first nourishment. 3.660. I’ll relate another tale that’s come to my ears 3.661. And it’s not so far away from the truth. 3.662. The Plebs of old, not yet protected by Tribunes 3.663. Fled, and gathered on the Sacred Mount: 3.664. The food supplies they’d brought with them failed 3.665. Also the stores of bread fit for human consumption. 3.666. There was a certain Anna from suburban Bovillae 3.667. A poor woman, old, but very industrious. 3.668. With her grey hair bound up in a light cap 4.91. She rules the whole world too, and truly deserves to: 4.92. She owns a realm not inferior to any god’s 4.93. Commands earth and heaven, and her native ocean 4.94. And maintains all beings from her source. 4.95. She created the gods (too numerous to mention): 4.96. She gave the crops and trees their first roots: 4.97. She brought the crude minds of men together 4.98. And taught them each to associate with a partner. 4.99. What but sweet pleasure creates all the race of birds? 4.100. Cattle wouldn’t mate, if gentle love were absent. 4.101. The wild ram butts the males with his horn 4.102. But won’t hurt the brow of his beloved ewe. 4.103. The bull, that the woods and pastures fear 4.104. Puts off his fierceness and follows the heifer. 4.105. The same force preserves whatever lives in the deep 4.106. And fills the waters with innumerable fish. 4.107. That force first stripped man of his wild apparel: 4.108. From it he learned refinement and elegance. 4.109. It’s said a banished lover first serenaded 4.110. His mistress by night, at her closed door 4.111. And eloquence then was the winning of a reluctant maid 4.112. And everyone pleaded his or her own cause. 4.113. A thousand arts are furthered by the goddess: and the wish 4.114. To delight has revealed many things that were hidden. 4.865. Venus suits those who earn by your profession. 4.866. offer incense and pray for beauty and men’s favour 6.251. I was rapt in prayer: I felt the heavenly deity 6.252. And the happy earth shone with radiant light. 6.253. Not that I saw you, goddess (away with poets’ lies!) 6.254. Nor were you to be looked on by any man: 6.255. But I knew what I’d not known, and the error 6.256. I’d held to were corrected without instruction. 6.319. Red-faced Priapus shall I tell of your shame or pass by? 6.320. It’s a brief tale but it’s a merry one. 6.321. Cybele, whose head is crowned with towers 6.322. Called the eternal gods to her feast. 6.323. She invited the satyrs too, and those rural divinities 6.324. The nymphs, and Silenus came, though no one asked him. 6.325. It’s forbidden, and would take too long, to describe the banquet 6.326. of the gods: the whole night was spent drinking deep. 6.327. Some wandered aimlessly in Ida’s shadowy vales 6.328. Some lay, and stretched their limbs, on the soft grass. 6.329. Some played, some slept, others linked arm 6.330. And beat swift feet threefold on the grassy earth. 6.331. Vesta lay carelessly, enjoying a peaceful rest 6.332. Her head reclining, resting on the turf. 6.333. But the red-faced keeper of gardens chased the nymph 6.334. And goddesses, and his roving feet turned to and fro. 6.335. He saw Vesta too: it’s doubtful whether he thought her 6.336. A nymph, or knew her as Vesta: he himself denied he knew. 6.337. He had wanton hopes, and tried to approach her in secret 6.338. And walked on tiptoe, with a pounding heart. 6.339. Old Silenus had chanced to leave the mule 6.340. He rode by the banks of a flowing stream. 6.341. The god of the long Hellespont was about to start 6.342. When the mule let out an untimely bray. 6.343. Frightened by the raucous noise, the goddess leapt up: 6.344. The whole troop gathered, and Priapus fled through their hands.
9. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.15, 4.7.40-4.7.41, 4.9.47-4.9.50, 4.11.61 (1st cent. BCE

10. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.10.61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.215-4.217, 9.616 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age
12. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.360-2.364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 9.137, 11.77, 33.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aedemon Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
africa (continent) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
anna perenna Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
apples Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
aristophanes Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
atlantic ocean Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
atlas, mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256, 401
bacchantes Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
bacchus Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
banquet, and horace Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
blessed, islands of the Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
breasts Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
bronze age Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
cadmus, and pastoral setting Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
calendar, and anniversary Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
calendar, and reperformance Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
canary islands Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
carthage, carthaginians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256, 401
citrus wood Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
cleopatra vii Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
cosmogony, in ovid Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
dissuere (loosen ) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
dye, purple Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256, 401
epigram (literary genre) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
exhortation (to enjoyment), plucking and seizing Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
faunus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
festivals, lupercalia Fantham, Latin Poets and Italian Gods (2009) 80
festivals Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
flavian period (literature, dress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
fortunata (wife of trimalchio) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
fortunate islands Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
gades (gadir, gadeira), distances and routes to Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
gaetulian purple Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256, 401
girdle Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
golden apples Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
gorgons Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
gorillai Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
hercules, hero, labors of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
hercules, pillars or columns of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
hercules Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
hesperides, divinities, apples of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
hesperides, divinities, gardens of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
hesperides islands Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
horace, quintus horatius flaccus, and reperformance Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
inscriptions, to the gods Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
italianness of roman religion Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
ivory Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
janus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
juba ii of mauretania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
lixus, city and river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
lupercalia Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
luxury Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
maecenas, gaius cilnius Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
marcia Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
martial Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
mauretania, products of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256, 401
mauretania, romans and Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
mauretania tingitana Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
mitra (headscarf) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
mythology in roman religions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
naiad Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
naked Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
nonnus, dionysiaca Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
ombrios Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
omphale Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
ovid, metamorphoses Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
ovid, publius ovidius naso Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
ovid Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
panels (of fabric) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
periplous, periploi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
petronius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
plagulae (fabric panels) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
propertius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 249
ptolemy of mauretania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
religions, roman, festivals Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
religions, roman, italianness Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
religions, roman, mythology' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
renaissance Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
ritual Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
romulus Fantham, Latin Poets and Italian Gods (2009) 80
sala Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
seams Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249
sebosus statius Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 401
suetonius paulinus, c. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
synthesis (garment) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
theocritus, idyll Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
trica (triclinium (trimalchio Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
typhonomachy, and plouto Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
typhonomachy, and typhon Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
tyre (tyros) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 256
valerius maximus Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
vediovis Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
veil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
venus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
vesta Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 212
wine, and horace Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
wine, and reperformance Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
wool, woollen Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
worry (about future, death), and wine Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 85
zona (belt) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 249