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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 2.138-2.144


quodcumque est alto sub Iove, Caesar habetCaesar possesses all beneath Jupiter’s heavens.


tu rapis, hic castas duce se iubet esse maritas:You raped married women: under Caesar they are ordered


tu recipis luco, reppulit ille nefas.To be chaste: you permitted the guilty your grove: he forbids them.


vis tibi grata fuit, florent sub Caesare leges.Force was acceptable to you: under Caesar the laws flourish.


tu domini nomen, principis ille tenetYou had the title Master: he bears the name of Prince.


te Remus incusat, veniam dedit hostibus ille.Remus accused you, while he pardons his enemies.


caelestem fecit te pater, ille patrem.Your father deified you: he deified his father.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Callimachus, Aetia, 100 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 35 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Horace, Epodes, 7.17-7.20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Fasti, 1.85-1.86, 1.515-1.518, 1.529-1.532, 1.587-1.616, 2.3-2.4, 2.47-2.54, 2.59, 2.61, 2.122, 2.127-2.137, 2.139-2.148, 2.153-2.192, 2.267-2.380, 2.684, 3.111-3.112, 4.843-4.848, 5.471-5.472, 6.91-6.92 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.85. When Jupiter watches the whole world from his hill 1.86. Everything that he sees belongs to Rome. 1.515. And from this earth all the earth receive its laws? 1.516. The whole world is one day promised to these hills: 1.517. Who could believe the place held such fate in store? 1.518. Soon Trojan ships will touch these shores 1.529. And a god in person will hold the sacred rites. 1.530. The safety of the country will lie with Augustus’ house: 1.531. It’s decreed this family will hold the reins of empire. 1.532. So Caesar’s son, Augustus, and grandson, Tiberius 1.587. offers to the flames the entrails of a gelded ram: 1.588. All the provinces were returned to our people 1.589. And your grandfather was given the name Augustus. 1.590. Read the legends on wax images in noble halls 1.591. Such titles were never bestowed on men before. 1.592. Here Africa named her conqueror after herself: 1.593. Another witnesses to Isaurian or Cretan power tamed: 1.594. This makes glory from Numidians, that Messana 1.595. While the next drew his fame from Numantia. 1.596. Drusus owed his death and glory to Germany – 1.597. Alas, how brief that great virtue was! 1.598. If Caesar was to take his titles from the defeated 1.599. He would need as many names as tribes on earth. 1.600. Some have earned fame from lone enemies 1.601. Named from a torque won or a raven-companion. 1.602. Pompey the Great, your name reflects your deeds 1.603. But he who defeated you was greater still. 1.604. No surname ranks higher than that of the Fabii 1.605. Their family was called Greatest for their services. 1.606. Yet these are human honours bestowed on all. 1.607. Augustus alone has a name that ranks with great Jove. 1.608. Sacred things are called august by the senators 1.609. And so are temples duly dedicated by priestly hands. 1.610. From the same root comes the word augury 1.611. And Jupiter augments things by his power. 1.612. May he augment our leader’s empire and his years 1.613. And may the oak-leaf crown protect his doors. 1.614. By the god’s auspices, may the father’s omen 1.615. Attend the heir of so great a name, when he rules the world. 1.616. When the third sun looks back on the past Ides 2.47. Yet (lest you err, through ignorance of their old order) 2.48. Though January is the first month, and was before 2.49. February that follows was once last in the ancient year. 2.50. And your worship, Terminus, closed the sacred rites. 2.51. The month of Janus came first, being the entrance (janua): 2.52. This month was last, sacred to the last rites of the dead. 2.53. Afterwards the Decemvirs are thought to have brought together 2.54. These months that had been parted by a wide interval of time. 2.59. All the rest would have similarly fallen in ruins 2.61. Under whose rule the shrines are untouched by age: 2.127. Sacred Father of the Country, this title has been conferred 2.128. On you, by the senate, the people, and by us, the knights. 2.129. Events had already granted it. Tardily you received 2.130. Your true title, you’d long been Father of the World. 2.131. You have on earth the name that Jupiter owns to 2.132. In high heaven: you are father of men, he of gods. 2.133. Romulus, give way: Caesar by his care makes your wall 2.134. Mighty: you made such as Remus could leap across. 2.139. You raped married women: under Caesar they are ordered 2.140. To be chaste: you permitted the guilty your grove: he forbids them. 2.141. Force was acceptable to you: under Caesar the laws flourish. 2.142. You had the title Master: he bears the name of Prince. 2.143. Remus accused you, while he pardons his enemies. 2.144. Your father deified you: he deified his father. 2.146. And pours the gods flowing nectar mixed with water 2.153. On the third night, you will see straight away 2.154. That the Bear Keeper Bootes’ feet have emerged. 2.155. Callisto was one of the Hamadryads, among 2.156. The sacred band of the huntress Diana. 2.157. She laid her hand on the goddess’ bow, saying: 2.158. ‘Bear witness, bow I touch, to my virginity.’ 2.159. Cynthia praised the vow: ‘Keep faith with that 2.160. And you will be first among my companions.’ 2.161. She’d have kept her vow, if she’d not been beautiful: 2.162. She was wary of men, but sinned with Jupiter. 2.163. Phoebe had hunted many creatures through the woods 2.164. And was returning home at noon, or shortly after. 2.165. As she reached a grove (a dense grove dark with holm-oak 2.166. With a deep fount of cool water at its centre) 2.167. She said: ‘Arcadian virgin, let’s bathe here in the woods.’ 2.168. The girl blushed at the false title of virgin. 2.169. Diana spoke to the nymphs, and they undressed. 2.170. Callisto was ashamed, and gave bashful signs of delay. 2.171. Removing her tunic, her swollen belly 2.172. Gave clear witness to the burden she carried. 2.173. The goddess spoke to her, saying: ‘Daughter of Lycaon 2.174. Oath-breaker, leave the virgin band, do not defile pure waters.’ 2.175. Ten times the moon completed her full orb 2.176. When she, thought to be virgin, became a mother. 2.177. Juno, wounded, raged, and altered the girl’s form. 2.178. What would you? Jupiter had ravished her against her will. 2.179. And seeing in his victim a shameful animal face 2.180. Juno said: ‘Let Jupiter enjoy her embraces now!’ 2.181. She who had been loved by highest Jove 2.182. Roamed the wild mountains as a shaggy she-bear. 2.183. The boy she conceived furtively was adolescent 2.184. When the mother met the child she had born. 2.185. She reared, wildly, and growled, as if she knew him: 2.186. Growling was his mother’s only mode of speech. 2.187. The boy, unknowing, would have pierced her with his sharp spear 2.188. But they were both caught up into the heavenly mansions. 2.189. They shine as neighbouring constellations: first the Bear 2.190. Then the Bear-keeper takes shape behind her back. 2.191. Still, Juno, Saturn’s daughter, rages and begs grey Tethy 2.192. Never to wash the Maenalian Bear with her waters. 2.281. So we worship the god, and the priest perform 2.282. The rites the Pelasgians brought in the ancient way. 2.305. By chance Tirynthian Hercules was walking with Omphale 2.306. His mistress, and Faunus saw them from a high ridge. 2.307. He saw and burned. ‘Mountain spirits,’ he said 2.308. ‘No more of your company: she will be my passion.’ 2.309. As the Maeonian girl went by her fragrant hair streamed 2.310. Over her shoulders, her breast was bright with gold: 2.311. A gilded parasol protected her from warm sunlight 2.312. One Herculean hands, indeed, held over her. 2.313. Now she came to Bacchus’ grove, and Tmolus’ vineyard 2.314. While dew-wet Hesperus rode his dusky steed. 2.315. She entered a cave roofed with tufa and natural rock 2.316. And there was a babbling stream at its entrance. 2.317. While her attendants were preparing food and wine 2.318. She clothed Hercules in her own garments. 2.319. She gave him thin vests dyed in Gaetulian purple 2.320. Gave him the elegant zone that had bound her waist. 2.321. The zone was too small for his belly, and he unfastened 2.322. The clasps of the vests to thrust out his great hands. 2.323. He fractured her bracelets, not made for such arms 2.324. And his giant feet split the little shoes. 2.325. She took up his heavy club, and the lion’s pelt 2.326. And those lesser weapons lodged in their quiver. 2.327. So dressed, they feasted, and gave themselves to sleep 2.328. Resting on separate couches set next to one another 2.329. Because they were preparing to celebrate the rite 2.330. of the discoverer of the vine, with purity, at dawn. 2.331. It was midnight. What will unruly love not dare? 2.332. Faunus came through the dark to the dewy cave 2.333. And seeing the servants lost in drunken slumber 2.334. Had hopes of their master also being fast asleep. 2.335. Entering, as a reckless lover, he roamed around 2.336. Following his cautious outstretched hands. 2.337. He reached the couches spread as beds, by touch 2.338. And this first omen of the future was bright. 2.339. When he felt the bristling tawny lion-skin 2.340. However, he drew back his hand in terror 2.341. And recoiled, frozen with fear, as a traveller, troubled 2.342. Will draw back his foot on seeing a snake. 2.343. Then he touched the soft coverings of the next couch 2.344. And its deceptive feel misled him. 2.345. He climbed in, and reclined on the bed’s near side 2.346. And his swollen cock was harder than horn. 2.347. But pulling up the lower hem of the tunic 2.348. The legs there were bristling with thick coarse hair. 2.349. The Tirynthian hero fiercely repelled another attempt 2.350. And down fell Faunus from the heights of the couch. 2.351. At the noise, Omphale called for her servants, and light: 2.352. Torches appeared, and events became clear. 2.353. Faunus groaned from his heavy fall from the high couch 2.354. And could barely lift his limbs from the hard ground. 2.355. Hercules laughed, as did all who saw him lying there 2.356. And the Lydian girl laughed too, at her lover. 2.357. Betrayed by his clothing: so the god hates clothe 2.358. That trick the eye, and calls the naked to his rites. 2.684. The extent of the City of Rome and the world is one. 3.111. The stars then ran their course, freely, unobserved 3.112. Each year: yet everyone held them to be gods. 4.843. With his shovel: Remus sank, bloodied, to the stony ground. 4.844. When the king heard, he smothered his rising tears 4.845. And kept the grief locked in his heart. 4.846. He wouldn’t weep in public, but set an example of fortitude 4.847. Saying: ‘So dies the enemy who shall cross my walls.’ 4.848. But he granted him funeral honours, and couldn’t 5.471. Savage Celer, wounded, may you yield your cruel spirit 5.472. And bloodstained as I am, sink beneath the earth.
6. Ovid, Tristia, 1.5.69-1.5.70, 3.7.51-3.7.52, 4.4.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Propertius, Elegies, 3.11.57 (1st cent. BCE

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.286-1.290, 1.292-1.293, 4.231 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.286. place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. 1.287. Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green 1.288. they rally their lost powers, and feast them well 1.289. on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. 1.290. But hunger banished and the banquet done 1.292. 'twixt hopes and fears divided; for who knows 1.293. whether the lost ones live, or strive with death 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line
9. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 3.39 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Suetonius, Augustus, 58 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium, actian, actiaca Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
actium Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
aeneas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
aeneid Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74
aetiology, origins, causae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
agrippa Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73
ancilia, the salian shields Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
antithesis Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 199
apollo Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
astronomy, stars, catasterism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
augustus, caesar (iulius) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73, 74
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
augustus/octavian, as collective construction Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
augustus/octavian, as object of public gaze Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
augustus/octavian, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
augustus/octavian, relation with caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
autocracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
belatedness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
cadmus, and pastoral setting Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
calendar, caesars reform ('45\u202fbce)" Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
callimachus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
carmentis Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73, 74
celer Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
concordia, concord Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 199
concordia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
concordia augusta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
consensus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
corona civica Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 199
cosmogony, in ovid Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
distancing, (divine) charisma Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198, 199
doubt Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
drusus (nero claudius drusus) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73
emotions Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
empire, of the imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
ennius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 74, 198, 199
fama Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
fas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74
festivals, of ara pacis augustae (30 march) with janus and salus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
festivals, salian festival Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
fortuna Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
forum augustum Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 198
founder Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 199
honorific titles, augustus as pater patriae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198, 199
honorific titles, of augustus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198, 199
humour Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
hyperbole Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
immortality, of mamurius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
imperial family Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 73, 74
imperium Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73, 74
indeterminacy, hindsight Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
intermediality Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 73, 74
intertextuality Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74, 198; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
julius caesar, deification, divinity Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
julius caesar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 199
jupiter Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74, 199
laurel Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
laws Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
mamurius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
mark antony Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 123
memory Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
nonnus, dionysiaca Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
numen Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
offerings, sacrificial rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
ovid, metamorphoses Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
ovids poems, amores Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
ovids poems, ars amatoria Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
pax augusta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 73, 74
performance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72, 233
piety, pietas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 123
power, of the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
prayer Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 74
propertius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
religious-political legitimisation Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74
remus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 123, 199
res publica, of readers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
res publica Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 233
rituals, by augustus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74
roman hegemony Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73, 74, 123
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 123
salii Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 198
salus, well-being Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
saviour Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 199
securitas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74, 198, 199
slave Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 199
temples, of concordia augusta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72
theocritus, idyll Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
tiberius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 73
triumph Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 73
typhonomachy, and plouto Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
typhonomachy, and typhon Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 24
tyranny, tyrant Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 199
venus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74
vergil Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 74, 123
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
visual texts' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 72
war, weapons (arma) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 72, 73, 123