Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 1.295-1.310


Quis vetat et stellas, ut quaeque oriturque caditqueWhat prevents me speaking of the stars, and their rising


dicere? promissi pars fuit ista mei.And setting? That was a part of what I’ve promised.


felices animae, quibus haec cognoscere primisHappy minds that first took the trouble to consider


inque domus superas scandere cura fuit!These things, and to climb to the celestial regions!


credibile est illos pariter vitiisque locisqueWe can be certain that they raised their head


altius humanis exeruisse caput.Above the failings and the homes of men, alike.


non Venus et vinum sublimia pectora fregitNeither wine nor lust destroyed their noble natures


officiumque fori militiaeve labor;Nor public business nor military service:


nec levis ambitio perfusaque gloria fucoThey were not seduced by trivial ambitions


magnarumque fames sollicitavit opum.Illusions of bright glory, nor hunger for great wealth.


admovere oculis distantia sidera nostrisThey brought the distant stars within our vision


aetheraque ingenio supposuere suo.And subjected the heavens to their genius.


sic petitur caelum: non ut ferat Ossan OlympusSo we reach the sky: there’s no need for Ossa to be piled


summaque Peliacus sidera tangat apex.On Olympus, or Pelion’s summit touch the highest stars.


nos quoque sub ducibus caelum metabimur illisFollowing these masters I too will measure out the skies


ponemusque suos ad vaga signa dies.And attribute the wheeling signs to their proper dates.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Germanicus Caesar, Aratea, 100-102, 16, 2, 218-222, 3, 362-367, 4, 558-560, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.62-1.69, 1.72-1.73, 1.78-1.79 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 1.1-1.290, 1.293-1.294, 1.296-1.310, 1.315-1.316, 3.155-3.162, 4.79-4.84 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. I’ll speak of divisions of time throughout the Roman year 1.2. Their origins, and the stars that set beneath the earth and rise. 1.4. And direct the voyage of my uncertain vessel: 1.6. Receiving with favour the homage I pay you. 1.7. Here you’ll revisit the sacred rites in the ancient texts 1.9. And here you’ll find the festivals of your House 1.10. And see your father’s and your grandfather’s name: 1.14. And those days that he added to the sacred rites. 1.17. Be kind to me, and you’ll empower my verse: 1.18. My wit will stand or fall by your glance. 1.19. My page trembles, judged by a learned prince 1.20. As if it were being read by Clarian Apollo. 1.25. If it’s right and lawful, a poet, guide the poet’s reins 1.27. When Rome’s founder established the calendar 1.28. He determined there’d be ten months in every year. 1.29. You knew more about swords than stars, Romulus, surely 1.30. Since conquering neighbours was your chief concern. 1.31. Yet there’s a logic that might have possessed him 1.32. Caesar, and that might well justify his error. 1.33. He held that the time it takes for a mother’s womb 1.34. To produce a child, was sufficient for his year. 1.35. For as many months also, after her husband’s funeral 1.36. A widow maintains signs of mourning in her house. 1.37. So Quirinus in his ceremonial robes had that in view 1.38. When he decreed his year to an unsophisticated people. 1.39. Mars’ month, March, was the first, and Venus’ April second: 1.40. She was the mother of the race, and he its father. 1.41. The third month May took its name from the old (maiores) 1.42. The fourth, June, from the young (iuvenes), the rest were numbered. 1.43. But Numa did not neglect Janus and the ancestral shades 1.44. And therefore added two months to the ancient ten. 1.45. Yet lest you’re unaware of the laws of the various days 1.46. Know Dawn doesn’t always bring the same observances. 1.47. Those days are unlawful (nefastus) when the praetor’s three word 1.48. May not be spoken, lawful (fastus) when law may be enacted. 1.49. But don’t assume each day maintains its character throughout: 1.50. What’s now a lawful day may have been unlawful at dawn: 1.51. Since once the sacrifice has been offered, all is acceptable 1.52. And the honoured praetor is then allowed free speech. 1.53. There are those days, comitiales, when the people vote: 1.54. And the market days that always recur in a nine-day cycle. 1.56. While a larger white ewe-lamb falls to Jupiter on the Ides: 1.57. The Nones though lack a tutelary god. After all these days 1.63. See how Janus appears first in my song 1.64. To announce a happy year for you, Germanicus. 1.67. Be favourable to the leaders, whose labours win 1.69. Be favourable to the senate and Roman people 1.71. A prosperous day dawns: favour our thoughts and speech! 1.72. Let auspicious words be said on this auspicious day. 1.73. Let our ears be free of lawsuits then, and banish 1.74. Mad disputes now: you, malicious tongues, cease wagging! 1.75. See how the air shines with fragrant fire 1.76. And Cilician grains crackle on lit hearths! 1.77. The flame beats brightly on the temple’s gold 1.78. And spreads a flickering light on the shrine’s roof. 1.79. Spotless garments make their way to Tarpeian Heights 1.80. And the crowd wear the colours of the festival: 1.81. Now the new rods and axes lead, new purple glows 1.82. And the distinctive ivory chair feels fresh weight. 1.83. Heifers that grazed the grass on Faliscan plains 1.84. Unbroken to the yoke, bow their necks to the axe. 1.85. When Jupiter watches the whole world from his hill 1.86. Everything that he sees belongs to Rome. 1.87. Hail, day of joy, and return forever, happier still 1.88. Worthy to be cherished by a race that rules the world. 1.102. Over the days, and remember my speech. 1.103. The ancients called me Chaos (since I am of the first world): 1.105. The clear air, and the three other elements 1.106. Fire, water, earth, were heaped together as one. 1.107. When, through the discord of its components 1.108. The mass dissolved, and scattered to new regions 1.109. Flame found the heights: air took a lower place 1.110. While earth and sea sank to the furthest depth. 1.111. Then I, who was a shapeless mass, a ball 1.112. Took on the appearance, and noble limbs of a god. 1.113. Even now, a small sign of my once confused state 1.114. My front and back appear just the same. 1.117. Whatever you see: sky, sea, clouds, earth 1.118. All things are begun and ended by my hand. 1.119. Care of the vast world is in my hands alone 1.120. And mine the goverce of the turning pole. 1.121. When I choose to send Peace, from tranquil houses 1.122. Freely she walks the roads, and ceaselessly: 1.123. The whole world would drown in bloodstained slaughter 1.124. If rigid barriers failed to hold war in check. 1.129. With salt: on his sacrificial lips I’m Patulcius 1.130. And then again I’m called Clusius. 1.135. Every doorway has two sides, this way and that 1.136. One facing the crowds, and the other the Lares: 1.141. You see Hecate’s faces turned in three directions 1.171. Next I said: ‘Why, while I placate other gods, Janus 1.172. Do I bring the wine and incense first to you?’ 1.173. He replied: ‘So that through me, who guard the threshold 1.174. You can have access to whichever god you please.’ 1.181. When the temples and ears of the gods are open 1.209. But ever since Fortune, here, has raised her head 1.210. And Rome has brushed the heavens with her brow 1.223. We too delight in golden temples, however much 1.224. We approve the antique: such splendour suits a god. 1.225. We praise the past, but experience our own times: 1.226. Yet both are ways worthy of being cultivated.’ 1.229. ‘Indeed I’ve learned much: but why is there a ship’s figure 1.230. On one side of the copper as, a twin shape on the other?’ 1.231. ‘You might have recognised me in the double-image’ 1.232. He said, ‘if length of days had not worn the coin away. 1.233. The reason for the ship is that the god of the sickle 1.234. Wandering the globe, by ship, reached the Tuscan river. 1.235. I remember how Saturn was welcomed in this land: 1.236. Driven by Jupiter from the celestial regions. 1.243. Here, where Rome is now, uncut forest thrived 1.244. And all this was pasture for scattered cattle. 1.249. Justice had not yet fled from human sin 1.250. (She was the last deity to leave the earth) 1.251. Shame without force, instead of fear, ruled the people 1.260. He at once retold the warlike acts of Oebalian Tatius 1.261. And how the treacherous keeper, Tarpeia, bribed with bracelets 1.262. Led the silent Sabines to the heights of the citadel. 1.277. ‘But why hide in peace, and open your gates in war?’ 1.278. He swiftly gave me the answer that I sought: 1.279. ‘My unbarred gate stands open wide, so that when 1.280. The people go to war the return path’s open too.’ 1.281. I bar it in peacetime so peace cannot depart: 1.282. And by Caesar’s will I shall be long closed.’ 1.283. He spoke, and raising his eyes that looked both ways 1.284. He surveyed whatever existed in the whole world. 1.285. There was peace, and already a cause of triumph, Germanicus 1.286. The Rhine had yielded her waters up in submission to you. 1.287. Janus, make peace and the agents of peace eternal 1.288. And grant the author may never abandon his work. 1.289. Now for what I’ve learned from the calendar itself: 1.290. The senate dedicated two temples on this day. 1.296. And setting? That was a part of what I’ve promised. 1.297. Happy minds that first took the trouble to consider 1.298. These things, and to climb to the celestial regions! 1.299. We can be certain that they raised their head 1.300. Above the failings and the homes of men, alike. 1.301. Neither wine nor lust destroyed their noble natures 1.302. Nor public business nor military service: 1.303. They were not seduced by trivial ambitions 1.304. Illusions of bright glory, nor hunger for great wealth. 1.305. They brought the distant stars within our vision 1.306. And subjected the heavens to their genius. 1.307. So we reach the sky: there’s no need for Ossa to be piled 1.308. On Olympus, or Pelion’s summit touch the highest stars. 1.309. Following these masters I too will measure out the skies 1.310. And attribute the wheeling signs to their proper dates. 1.315. Should the Nones be here, rain from dark cloud 1.316. Will be the sign, at the rising of the Lyre. 3.155. But the calendar was still erratic down to the time 3.156. When Caesar took it, and many other things, in hand. 3.157. That god, the founder of a mighty house, did not 3.158. Regard the matter as beneath his attention 3.159. And wished to have prescience of those heaven 3.160. Promised him, not be an unknown god entering a strange house. 3.161. He is said to have drawn up an exact table 3.162. of the periods in which the sun returns to its previous signs.
4. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.286-1.288, 6.789-6.792, 6.794-6.797, 6.849-6.853, 9.641-9.642 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.286. place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. 1.287. Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green 1.288. they rally their lost powers, and feast them well 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 9.641. Tumultuously shouting, they impaled 9.642. on lifted spears—O pitiable sight! —
5. Vergil, Georgics, 2.475-2.540, 3.8-3.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.475. So scathe it, as the flocks with venom-bite 2.476. of their hard tooth, whose gnawing scars the stem. 2.477. For no offence but this to Bacchus bleed 2.478. The goat at every altar, and old play 2.479. Upon the stage find entrance; therefore too 2.480. The sons of Theseus through the country-side— 2.481. Hamlet and crossway—set the prize of wit 2.482. And on the smooth sward over oiled skin 2.483. Dance in their tipsy frolic. Furthermore 2.484. The Ausonian swains, a race from placeName key= 2.485. Make merry with rough rhymes and boisterous mirth 2.486. Grim masks of hollowed bark assume, invoke 2.487. Thee with glad hymns, O Bacchus, and to thee 2.488. Hang puppet-faces on tall pines to swing. 2.489. Hence every vineyard teems with mellowing fruit 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing 2.493. Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate 2.494. And dishes bear him; and the doomed goat 2.495. Led by the horn shall at the altar stand 2.496. Whose entrails rich on hazel-spits we'll roast. 2.497. This further task again, to dress the vine 2.498. Hath needs beyond exhausting; the whole soil 2.499. Thrice, four times, yearly must be cleft, the sod 2.500. With hoes reversed be crushed continually 2.501. The whole plantation lightened of its leaves. 2.502. Round on the labourer spins the wheel of toil 2.503. As on its own track rolls the circling year. 2.504. Soon as the vine her lingering leaves hath shed 2.505. And the chill north wind from the forests shook 2.506. Their coronal, even then the careful swain 2.507. Looks keenly forward to the coming year 2.508. With Saturn's curved fang pursues and prune 2.509. The vine forlorn, and lops it into shape. 2.510. Be first to dig the ground up, first to clear 2.511. And burn the refuse-branches, first to house 2.512. Again your vine-poles, last to gather fruit. 2.513. Twice doth the thickening shade beset the vine 2.514. Twice weeds with stifling briers o'ergrow the crop; 2.515. And each a toilsome labour. Do thou praise 2.516. Broad acres, farm but few. Rough twigs beside 2.517. of butcher's broom among the woods are cut 2.518. And reeds upon the river-banks, and still 2.519. The undressed willow claims thy fostering care. 2.520. So now the vines are fettered, now the tree 2.521. Let go the sickle, and the last dresser now 2.522. Sings of his finished rows; but still the ground 2.523. Must vexed be, the dust be stirred, and heaven 2.524. Still set thee trembling for the ripened grapes. 2.525. Not so with olives; small husbandry need they 2.526. Nor look for sickle bowed or biting rake 2.527. When once they have gripped the soil, and borne the breeze. 2.528. Earth of herself, with hooked fang laid bare 2.529. Yields moisture for the plants, and heavy fruit 2.530. The ploughshare aiding; therewithal thou'lt rear 2.531. The olive's fatness well-beloved of Peace. 2.532. Apples, moreover, soon as first they feel 2.533. Their stems wax lusty, and have found their strength 2.534. To heaven climb swiftly, self-impelled, nor crave 2.535. Our succour. All the grove meanwhile no le 2.536. With fruit is swelling, and the wild haunts of bird 2.537. Blush with their blood-red berries. Cytisu 2.538. Is good to browse on, the tall forest yield 2.539. Pine-torches, and the nightly fires are fed 2.540. And shoot forth radiance. And shall men be loath 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
aratea (germanicus) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 128, 190
aratus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75
astrologers Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 127, 128
astrometeorology Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 127, 190
astronomica (manilius), absence of planets from Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 128
astronomica (manilius), and aratus Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 190
astronomica (manilius), and germanicus Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 190
astronomica (manilius), and ovid Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 190
astronomical preface, calendar-builders as duces in Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75, 76, 77, 78, 79
astronomical preface, literary precedents of Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 74, 75
astronomy, in anchises creed Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76, 77
augustus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
condere and derivatives in fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 79
de astronomia (hyginus) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 127
deification, and journey to the stars motif Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 76, 77, 78
deification, of augustus Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75, 76, 77, 78
deification, of caesar Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 75, 76, 77, 78
fasti (ovid) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 127, 128, 190
germanicus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
home Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
janus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
jupiter Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
lucretius, influence of on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 74, 75, 76
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
phaenomena (aratus) Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 190
philippics (cicero), planets, absence from augustan literature of Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 128
poet as emulator of city-builders, in fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 79
primacy, claims of avoidedin astronomical preface' Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 78
primacy, claims of avoidedin astronomical preface Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 79
propertius Green, Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid: Staging the Enemy under Augustus (2014) 190
rome Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
scythia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
souls Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
tiber Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
tiberian Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
vergil, influence of georgics on fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 74, 75