Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8585
Ovid, Fasti, 1.25


si licet et fas est, vates rege vatis habenasIf it’s right and lawful, a poet, guide the poet’s reins


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 4.8.63-4.8.64 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Ovid, Fasti, 1.1-1.24, 1.26-1.290, 1.293-1.310, 1.315-1.316, 1.637-1.652, 2.496, 3.87, 3.177, 3.714, 4.11-4.12, 4.19, 4.79-4.84, 4.95-4.162, 4.179-4.198, 4.827-4.832, 6.26, 6.793-6.794 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. I’ll speak of divisions of time throughout the Roman year 1.2. Their origins, and the stars that set beneath the earth and rise. 1.4. And direct the voyage of my uncertain vessel: 1.6. Receiving with favour the homage I pay you. 1.7. Here you’ll revisit the sacred rites in the ancient texts 1.9. And here you’ll find the festivals of your House 1.10. And see your father’s and your grandfather’s name: 1.14. And those days that he added to the sacred rites. 1.17. Be kind to me, and you’ll empower my verse: 1.18. My wit will stand or fall by your glance. 1.19. My page trembles, judged by a learned prince 1.20. As if it were being read by Clarian Apollo. 1.27. When Rome’s founder established the calendar 1.28. He determined there’d be ten months in every year. 1.29. You knew more about swords than stars, Romulus, surely 1.30. Since conquering neighbours was your chief concern. 1.31. Yet there’s a logic that might have possessed him 1.32. Caesar, and that might well justify his error. 1.33. He held that the time it takes for a mother’s womb 1.34. To produce a child, was sufficient for his year. 1.35. For as many months also, after her husband’s funeral 1.36. A widow maintains signs of mourning in her house. 1.37. So Quirinus in his ceremonial robes had that in view 1.38. When he decreed his year to an unsophisticated people. 1.39. Mars’ month, March, was the first, and Venus’ April second: 1.40. She was the mother of the race, and he its father. 1.41. The third month May took its name from the old (maiores) 1.42. The fourth, June, from the young (iuvenes), the rest were numbered. 1.43. But Numa did not neglect Janus and the ancestral shades 1.44. And therefore added two months to the ancient ten. 1.45. Yet lest you’re unaware of the laws of the various days 1.46. Know Dawn doesn’t always bring the same observances. 1.47. Those days are unlawful (nefastus) when the praetor’s three word 1.48. May not be spoken, lawful (fastus) when law may be enacted. 1.49. But don’t assume each day maintains its character throughout: 1.50. What’s now a lawful day may have been unlawful at dawn: 1.51. Since once the sacrifice has been offered, all is acceptable 1.52. And the honoured praetor is then allowed free speech. 1.53. There are those days, comitiales, when the people vote: 1.54. And the market days that always recur in a nine-day cycle. 1.56. While a larger white ewe-lamb falls to Jupiter on the Ides: 1.57. The Nones though lack a tutelary god. After all these days 1.63. See how Janus appears first in my song 1.64. To announce a happy year for you, Germanicus. 1.67. Be favourable to the leaders, whose labours win 1.69. Be favourable to the senate and Roman people 1.71. A prosperous day dawns: favour our thoughts and speech! 1.72. Let auspicious words be said on this auspicious day. 1.73. Let our ears be free of lawsuits then, and banish 1.74. Mad disputes now: you, malicious tongues, cease wagging! 1.75. See how the air shines with fragrant fire 1.76. And Cilician grains crackle on lit hearths! 1.77. The flame beats brightly on the temple’s gold 1.78. And spreads a flickering light on the shrine’s roof. 1.79. Spotless garments make their way to Tarpeian Heights 1.80. And the crowd wear the colours of the festival: 1.81. Now the new rods and axes lead, new purple glows 1.82. And the distinctive ivory chair feels fresh weight. 1.83. Heifers that grazed the grass on Faliscan plains 1.84. Unbroken to the yoke, bow their necks to the axe. 1.85. When Jupiter watches the whole world from his hill 1.86. Everything that he sees belongs to Rome. 1.87. Hail, day of joy, and return forever, happier still 1.88. Worthy to be cherished by a race that rules the world. 1.102. Over the days, and remember my speech. 1.103. The ancients called me Chaos (since I am of the first world): 1.105. The clear air, and the three other elements 1.106. Fire, water, earth, were heaped together as one. 1.107. When, through the discord of its components 1.108. The mass dissolved, and scattered to new regions 1.109. Flame found the heights: air took a lower place 1.110. While earth and sea sank to the furthest depth. 1.111. Then I, who was a shapeless mass, a ball 1.112. Took on the appearance, and noble limbs of a god. 1.113. Even now, a small sign of my once confused state 1.114. My front and back appear just the same. 1.117. Whatever you see: sky, sea, clouds, earth 1.118. All things are begun and ended by my hand. 1.119. Care of the vast world is in my hands alone 1.120. And mine the goverce of the turning pole. 1.121. When I choose to send Peace, from tranquil houses 1.122. Freely she walks the roads, and ceaselessly: 1.123. The whole world would drown in bloodstained slaughter 1.124. If rigid barriers failed to hold war in check. 1.129. With salt: on his sacrificial lips I’m Patulcius 1.130. And then again I’m called Clusius. 1.135. Every doorway has two sides, this way and that 1.136. One facing the crowds, and the other the Lares: 1.141. You see Hecate’s faces turned in three directions 1.171. Next I said: ‘Why, while I placate other gods, Janus 1.172. Do I bring the wine and incense first to you?’ 1.173. He replied: ‘So that through me, who guard the threshold 1.174. You can have access to whichever god you please.’ 1.181. When the temples and ears of the gods are open 1.209. But ever since Fortune, here, has raised her head 1.210. And Rome has brushed the heavens with her brow 1.223. We too delight in golden temples, however much 1.224. We approve the antique: such splendour suits a god. 1.225. We praise the past, but experience our own times: 1.226. Yet both are ways worthy of being cultivated.’ 1.229. ‘Indeed I’ve learned much: but why is there a ship’s figure 1.230. On one side of the copper as, a twin shape on the other?’ 1.231. ‘You might have recognised me in the double-image’ 1.232. He said, ‘if length of days had not worn the coin away. 1.233. The reason for the ship is that the god of the sickle 1.234. Wandering the globe, by ship, reached the Tuscan river. 1.235. I remember how Saturn was welcomed in this land: 1.236. Driven by Jupiter from the celestial regions. 1.243. Here, where Rome is now, uncut forest thrived 1.244. And all this was pasture for scattered cattle. 1.249. Justice had not yet fled from human sin 1.250. (She was the last deity to leave the earth) 1.251. Shame without force, instead of fear, ruled the people 1.260. He at once retold the warlike acts of Oebalian Tatius 1.261. And how the treacherous keeper, Tarpeia, bribed with bracelets 1.262. Led the silent Sabines to the heights of the citadel. 1.277. ‘But why hide in peace, and open your gates in war?’ 1.278. He swiftly gave me the answer that I sought: 1.279. ‘My unbarred gate stands open wide, so that when 1.280. The people go to war the return path’s open too.’ 1.281. I bar it in peacetime so peace cannot depart: 1.282. And by Caesar’s will I shall be long closed.’ 1.283. He spoke, and raising his eyes that looked both ways 1.284. He surveyed whatever existed in the whole world. 1.285. There was peace, and already a cause of triumph, Germanicus 1.286. The Rhine had yielded her waters up in submission to you. 1.287. Janus, make peace and the agents of peace eternal 1.288. And grant the author may never abandon his work. 1.289. Now for what I’ve learned from the calendar itself: 1.290. The senate dedicated two temples on this day. 1.295. What prevents me speaking of the stars, and their rising 1.296. And setting? That was a part of what I’ve promised. 1.297. Happy minds that first took the trouble to consider 1.298. These things, and to climb to the celestial regions! 1.299. We can be certain that they raised their head 1.300. Above the failings and the homes of men, alike. 1.301. Neither wine nor lust destroyed their noble natures 1.302. Nor public business nor military service: 1.303. They were not seduced by trivial ambitions 1.304. Illusions of bright glory, nor hunger for great wealth. 1.305. They brought the distant stars within our vision 1.306. And subjected the heavens to their genius. 1.307. So we reach the sky: there’s no need for Ossa to be piled 1.308. On Olympus, or Pelion’s summit touch the highest stars. 1.309. Following these masters I too will measure out the skies 1.310. And attribute the wheeling signs to their proper dates. 1.315. Should the Nones be here, rain from dark cloud 1.316. Will be the sign, at the rising of the Lyre. 1.637. Near where lofty Moneta lifts her noble stairway: 1.638. Concord, you will gaze on the Latin crowd’s prosperity 1.639. Now sacred hands have established you. 1.640. Camillus, conqueror of the Etruscan people 1.641. Vowed your ancient temple and kept his vow. 1.642. His reason was that the commoners had armed themselves 1.643. Seceding from the nobles, and Rome feared their power. 1.644. This latest reason was a better one: revered Leader, Germany 1.645. offered up her dishevelled tresses, at your command: 1.646. From that, you dedicated the spoils of a defeated race 1.647. And built a shrine to the goddess that you yourself worship. 1.648. A goddess your mother honoured by her life, and by an altar 2.496. All fled, and the king rose to the stars behind his father’s horses. 3.714. I’ll not speak about Semele: you’d have been born defenceless 4.11. From ancient texts I sing the days and reasons 4.95. She created the gods (too numerous to mention): 4.96. She gave the crops and trees their first roots: 4.97. She brought the crude minds of men together 4.98. And taught them each to associate with a partner. 4.99. What but sweet pleasure creates all the race of birds? 4.100. Cattle wouldn’t mate, if gentle love were absent. 4.101. The wild ram butts the males with his horn 4.102. But won’t hurt the brow of his beloved ewe. 4.103. The bull, that the woods and pastures fear 4.104. Puts off his fierceness and follows the heifer. 4.105. The same force preserves whatever lives in the deep 4.106. And fills the waters with innumerable fish. 4.107. That force first stripped man of his wild apparel: 4.108. From it he learned refinement and elegance. 4.109. It’s said a banished lover first serenaded 4.110. His mistress by night, at her closed door 4.111. And eloquence then was the winning of a reluctant maid 4.112. And everyone pleaded his or her own cause. 4.113. A thousand arts are furthered by the goddess: and the wish 4.114. To delight has revealed many things that were hidden. 4.115. Who dares to steal her honour of naming the second month? 4.116. Let such madness be far from my thoughts. 4.117. Besides, though she’s powerful everywhere, her temple 4.118. Crowded, doesn’t she hold most sway in our City? 4.119. Venus, Roman, carried weapons to defend your Troy 4.120. And groaned at the spear wound in her gentle hand: 4.121. And she defeated two goddesses, by a Trojan judgement 4.122. (Ah! If only they hadn’t remembered her victory!) 4.123. And she was called the bride of Assaracus’s son 4.124. So that mighty Caesar would have Julian ancestors. 4.125. No season is more fitting for Venus than Spring: 4.126. In spring the earth gleams: in spring the ground’s soft 4.127. Now the grass pokes its tips through the broken soil 4.128. Now the vine bursts in buds through the swollen bark. 4.129. And lovely Venus deserves the lovely season 4.130. And is joined again to her darling Mars: 4.131. In Spring she tells the curving ships to sail, over 4.132. Her native seas, and fear the winter’s threat no longer. 4.133. Perform the rites of the goddess, Roman brides and mothers 4.134. And you who must not wear the headbands and long robes. 4.135. Remove the golden necklaces from her marble neck 4.136. Remove her riches: the goddess must be cleansed, complete. 4.137. Return the gold necklaces to her neck, once it’s dry: 4.138. Now she’s given fresh flowers, and new-sprung roses. 4.139. She commands you too to bathe, under the green myrtle 4.140. And there’s a particular reason for her command (learn, now!). 4.141. Naked, on the shore, she was drying her dripping hair: 4.142. The Satyrs, that wanton crowd, spied the goddess. 4.143. She sensed it, and hid her body with a screen of myrtle: 4.144. Doing so, she was safe: she commands that you do so too. 4.145. Learn now why you offer incense to Fortuna Virilis 4.146. In that place that steams with heated water. 4.147. All women remove their clothes on entering 4.148. And every blemish on their bodies is seen: 4.149. Virile Fortune undertakes to hide those from the men 4.150. And she does this at the behest of a little incense. 4.151. Don’t begrudge her poppies, crushed in creamy milk 4.152. And in flowing honey, squeezed from the comb: 4.153. When Venus was first led to her eager spouse 4.154. She drank so: and from that moment was a bride. 4.155. Please her with words of supplication: beauty 4.156. Virtue, and good repute are in her keeping. 4.157. In our forefather’s time Rome lapsed from chastity: 4.158. And the ancients consulted the old woman of Cumae. 4.159. She ordered a temple built to Venus: when it was done 4.160. Venus took the name of Heart-Changer (Verticordia). 4.161. Loveliest One, always look with a benign gaze 4.162. On the sons of Aeneas, and guard their many wives. 4.179. Let the sky turn three times on its axis 4.180. Let the Sun three times yoke and loose his horses 4.181. And the Berecyntian flute will begin sounding 4.182. Its curved horn, it will be the Idaean Mother’s feast. 4.183. Eunuchs will march, and sound the hollow drums 4.184. And cymbal will clash with cymbal, in ringing tones: 4.185. Seated on the soft necks of her servants, she’ll be carried 4.186. With howling, through the midst of the City streets. 4.187. The stage is set: the games are calling. Watch, then 4.188. Quirites, and let those legal wars in the fora cease. 4.189. I’d like to ask many things, but I’m made fearful 4.190. By shrill clash of bronze, and curved flute’s dreadful drone. 4.191. ‘Lend me someone to ask, goddess.’ Cybele spying her learned 4.192. Granddaughters, the Muses, ordered them to take care of me. 4.193. ‘Nurslings of Helicon, mindful of her orders, reveal 4.194. Why the Great Goddess delights in continual din.’ 4.195. So I spoke. And Erato replied (it fell to her to speak about 4.196. Venus’ month, because her name derives from tender love): 4.197. ‘Saturn was granted this prophecy: “Noblest of kings 4.198. You’ll be ousted by your own son’s sceptre.” 4.827. So spoke the king: ‘Be with me, as I found my City 4.828. Jupiter, Father Mavors, and Mother Vesta: 4.829. And all you gods, whom piety summons, take note. 4.830. Let my work be done beneath your auspices. 4.831. May it last long, and rule a conquered world 4.832. All subject, from the rising to the setting day.’ 6.793. Next day the Lares are granted a sanctuary in the place 6.794. Where endless wreaths are twined by skilful hands.
3. Propertius, Elegies, 4.6.1 (1st cent. BCE

4. Manilius, Astronomica, 1.1-1.6



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, adulter Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
aeneas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
aetiology, origins, causae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 23, 133
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
apollo Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
aratus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 98, 108, 133
audience, pluto, proserpina, and underworld as Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
augury Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
augustus, deification Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
augustus, divi filius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
augustus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
calendar Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 108, 133
callimachus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 98, 108, 133
carmentis Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
closeness to the gods, of augustus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
closeness to the gods, of ovid Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
concordia augusta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
condere and derivatives in fasti Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 80
cyane Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 98, 108, 133
divine support, by germanicus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
divinity (of a mortal) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 98
emotions Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
epiphany, of romulus-quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
euhemerus, euhemeristic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98, 133
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
exile, of ovid Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
exile poetry of ovid Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 23, 98
fas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
fasti praenestini Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
festivals, carmentalia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
festivals, ludi saeculares Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
festivals, of concordia on the forum Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
festivals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 133
foreign customs Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
germanicus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 98; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
helicon Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
hercules Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
hesiod Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
home Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
humour Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
imperial family Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
inspiration Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
inventions, of gods Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
irony, ironic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
irreverence Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
iustitia virgo Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
janus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
julius caesar, deification, divinity Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
jupiter, poetry beginning from Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 80
jupiter Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
legend, myth, fabula Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
liber Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
livia drusilla, julia augusta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
magic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23
maiestas, maiestas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 98
manilius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98, 108
muse, muses Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 133
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
neptune (poseidon) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
offerings, poems as offerings, sacred gifts (sacra), honos, honorem, cantibus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
offerings, sacrificial rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
offerings, votive offering, votum Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
ovids poems, epistulae ex ponto Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
ovids poems, metamorphoses Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 98
pagán, victoria Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
paraklausithyron Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
pluto (hades), as audience Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
poetic creation and its metaphors, chariot-race Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
prayer Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 108
ptolemies, berenice ii Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 98
pygmalion Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
revisions of the fasti Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 23
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 133
rome Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
romulus, as writer Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 80
romulus, deified, quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
salii, carmen saliare Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
scythia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 133
sharrock, alison Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
souls Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
surgat opus as poetic beginning' Pasco-Pranger, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar (2006) 80
temples, of concordia augusta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
temples, of janus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1
tiber Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
tiberian Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 177
tiberius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 1, 98, 108
vates, inspired poet Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 108, 133
venus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 152
vergil Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23, 108
women and men, of upper class Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 23