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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8584
Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 2.8
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Horace, Letters, 1.1-1.2, 1.13, 1.18-1.20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. 1. Those who undertake to write histories, do not, I perceive, take that trouble on one and the same account, but for many reasons, and those such as are very different one from another. 1.1. 3. I found, therefore, that the second of the Ptolemies was a king who was extraordinarily diligent in what concerned learning, and the collection of books; that he was also peculiarly ambitious to procure a translation of our law, and of the constitution of our government therein contained, into the Greek tongue. 1.1. it being an instance of greater wisdom not to have granted them life at all, than, after it was granted, to procure their destruction; “But the injuries,” said he, “they offered to my holiness and virtue, forced me to bring this punishment upon them. 1.2. For some of them apply themselves to this part of learning to show their skill in composition, and that they may therein acquire a reputation for speaking finely. Others of them there are who write histories in order to gratify those that happen to be concerned in them, and on that account have spared no pains, but rather gone beyond their own abilities in the performance. 1.2. neither could the legislator himself have a right mind without such a contemplation; nor would any thing he should write tend to the promotion of virtue in his readers; I mean, unless they be taught first of all, that God is the Father and Lord of all things, and sees all things, and that thence he bestows a happy life upon those that follow him; but plunges such as do not walk in the paths of virtue into inevitable miseries. 1.2. And when God had replied that there was no good man among the Sodomites; for if there were but ten such man among them, he would not punish any of them for their sins, Abraham held his peace. And the angels came to the city of the Sodomites, and Lot entreated them to accept of a lodging with him; for he was a very generous and hospitable man, and one that had learned to imitate the goodness of Abraham. Now when the Sodomites saw the young men to be of beautiful counteces, and this to an extraordinary degree, and that they took up their lodgings with Lot, they resolved themselves to enjoy these beautiful boys by force and violence; 1.13. while there were a vast number of other matters in our sacred books. They, indeed, contain in them the history of five thousand years; in which time happened many strange accidents, many chances of war, and great actions of the commanders, and mutations of the form of our government. 1.13. 2. The children of Ham possessed the land from Syria and Amanus, and the mountains of Libanus; seizing upon all that was on its sea-coasts, and as far as the ocean, and keeping it as their own. Some indeed of its names are utterly vanished away; others of them being changed, and another sound given them, are hardly to be discovered; yet a few there are which have kept their denominations entire. 1.18. 4. But because almost all our constitution depends on the wisdom of Moses, our legislator, I cannot avoid saying somewhat concerning him beforehand, though I shall do it briefly; I mean, because otherwise those that read my book may wonder how it comes to pass, that my discourse, which promises an account of laws and historical facts, contains so much of philosophy. 1.18. where Melchisedec, king of the city Salem, received him. That name signifies, the righteous king: and such he was, without dispute, insomuch that, on this account, he was made the priest of God: however, they afterward called Salem Jerusalem. 1.19. The reader is therefore to know, that Moses deemed it exceeding necessary, that he who would conduct his own life well, and give laws to others, in the first place should consider the divine nature; and, upon the contemplation of God’s operations, should thereby imitate the best of all patterns, so far as it is possible for human nature to do, and to endeavor to follow after it: 1.19. He also told her, that if she disobeyed God, and went on still in her way, she should perish; but if she would return back, she should become the mother of a son who should reign over that country. These admonitions she obeyed, and returned to her master and mistress, and obtained forgiveness. A little while afterwards, she bare Ismael; which may be interpreted Heard of God, because God had heard his mother’s prayer.
2. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 1.1, 2.5-2.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
augustan poetry book Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 27
augustus/octavian, as collective construction Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
authority, mutual constitution of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
authority, poetic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
book units (epistolography) Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 27
cicero, m. tullius Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
copying, of texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
cotta maximus Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 27, 82
ekphrasis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
empire, of the imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
exile Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
focalization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
handwriting Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
horace Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 27
information, transmission across distance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
judgment Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
livy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
macer Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
materiality Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
ovid Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 27, 82
ovids wife Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
performance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
pliny the younger Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 27
portraiture Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
reification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
role reversal Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231, 232
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
rome Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 27
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
style Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
subjective fallacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
succession Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
surveillance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
tears Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
temple Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 232
temporal dynamics Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
tiberius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
time-lag Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 82
transience Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
triumph, servus publicus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231
voice' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 231