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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8581
Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 3.119-3.122


Quae nunc sub Phoebo ducibusque Palatia fulgentBesides, the tender sex is form'd to bear


rend=And frequent births too soon will youth impair;


rend=what was that but pasture for ploughmen’s oxen? Others may delight in ancient times: I congratulate myself on having been born just now: this age suits my nature. Not because stubborn gold’s mined now from the earth, or choice shells come to us from farthest shores: nor because mountains shrink as marble’s quarried, or because blue waters retreat from the piers: but because civilisation’s here, and no crudity remains, in our age, that survives from our ancient ancestors. You too shouldn’t weight your ears with costly stones


Prisca iuvent alios: ego me nunc denique natumContinual harvest wears the fruitful field


rend=And earth itself decays, too often till'd.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Hesiod, Shield, 315, 314 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Homer, Iliad, 18.607-18.608 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

18.607. /and two tumblers whirled up and down through the midst of them as leaders in the dance.Therein he set also the great might of the river Oceanus, around the uttermost rim of the strongly-wrought shield.But when he had wrought the shield, great and sturdy 18.608. /and two tumblers whirled up and down through the midst of them as leaders in the dance.Therein he set also the great might of the river Oceanus, around the uttermost rim of the strongly-wrought shield.But when he had wrought the shield, great and sturdy
3. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 530-533, 529 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

529. οὔ κεν Ἀθηναίης χειρῶν δεδιδαγμένος ἀνὴρ
4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.83 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.83. But if the plants fixed and rooted in the rather owe their life and vigour to nature's art, surely the earth herself must be sustained by the same power, inasmuch as when impregnated with seeds she brings forth from her womb all things in profusion, nourishes their roots in her bosom and causes them to grow, and herself in turn is nourished by the upper and outer elements. Her exhalations moreover give nourishment to the air, the ether and all the heavenly bodies. Thus if earth is upheld and invigorated by nature, the same principle must hold good of the rest of the world, for plants are rooted in the earth, animals are sustained by breathing air, and the air itself is our partner in seeing, hearing and uttering sounds, since none of these actions can be performed without its aid; nay, it even moves as we move, for wherever we go or move our limbs, it seems as it were to give place and retire before us.
5. Cicero, Republic, 2.18-2.19 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.18. Atque hoc eo magis est in Romulo admirandum, quod ceteri, qui dii ex hominibus facti esse dicuntur, minus eruditis hominum saeculis fuerunt, ut fingendi proclivis esset ratio, cum imperiti facile ad credendum inpellerentur, Romuli autem aetatem minus his sescentis annis iam inveteratis litteris atque doctrinis omnique illo antiquo ex inculta hominum vita errore sublato fuisse cernimus. Nam si, id quod Graecorum investigatur annalibus, Roma condita est secundo anno Olympiadis septumae, in id saeculum Romuli cecidit aetas, cum iam plena Graecia poetarum et musicorum esset minorque fabulis nisi de veteribus rebus haberetur fides. Nam centum et octo annis postquam Lycurgus leges scribere instituit, prima posita est Olympias, quam quidam nominis errore ab eodem Lycurgo constitutam putant; Homerum autem, qui minimum dicunt, Lycurgi aetati triginta annis anteponunt fere. 2.19. Ex quo intellegi potest permultis annis ante Homerum fuisse quam Romulum, ut iam doctis hominibus ac temporibus ipsis eruditis ad fingendum vix quicquam esset loci. Antiquitas enim recepit fabulas fictas etiam non numquam August. C.D. 22.6 incondite, haec aetas autem iam exculta praesertim eludens omne, quod fieri non potest, respuit.
6. Catullus, Poems, 58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Livy, History, 1.12.3-1.12.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Ovid, Amores, 1.2, 3.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.103-1.106, 2.740, 3.101-3.118, 3.120-3.128, 3.169-3.192, 3.222, 3.271, 3.273, 3.281 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Ovid, Fasti, 1.111-1.112, 1.243-1.244, 4.949-4.954, 5.93-5.94, 6.267-6.280, 6.811-6.812 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.111. Then I, who was a shapeless mass, a ball 1.112. Took on the appearance, and noble limbs of a god. 1.243. Here, where Rome is now, uncut forest thrived 1.244. And all this was pasture for scattered cattle. 4.949. At her kinsman’s threshold: so the Senators justly decreed. 4.950. Phoebus takes part of the space there: a further part remain 4.951. For Vesta, and the third part that’s left, Caesar occupies. 4.952. Long live the laurels of the Palatine: long live that house 4.953. Decked with branches of oak: one place holds three eternal gods. 5.93. Where Rome, the capital of the world, now stand 5.94. There were trees, grass, a few sheep, the odd cottage. 6.267. Vesta’s identified with Earth: in them both’s unsleeping fire: 6.268. Earth and the hearth are both symbols of home. 6.269. The Earth’s a ball not resting on any support 6.270. It’s great weight hangs in the ether around it. 6.271. Its own revolutions keep its orb balanced 6.272. It has no sharp angles to press on anything 6.273. And it’s placed in the midst of the heavens 6.274. And isn’t nearer or further from any side 6.275. For if it weren’t convex, it would be nearer somewhere 6.276. And the universe wouldn’t have Earth’s weight at its centre. 6.277. There’s a globe suspended, enclosed by Syracusan art 6.278. That’s a small replica of the vast heavens 6.279. And the Earth’s equidistant from top and bottom. 6.280. Which is achieved by its spherical shape. 6.811. Caesar’s aunt was once married to that Philip: 6.812. O ornament, O lady worthy of that sacred house!’
11. Ovid, Medicamina Faciei Femineae, 24, 23 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.87-1.88, 1.175-1.176, 13.2, 13.110, 13.289-13.291 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4-3.5, 4.1.3-4.1.4, 4.8.75, 4.9, 4.9.19-4.9.20, 4.9.29, 4.9.33, 4.9.37-4.9.50 (1st cent. BCE

15. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.306-8.369, 8.675, 8.726-8.728 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.306. rolling this way and that his wrathful eyes 8.307. gnashing his teeth. Three times his ire surveyed 8.308. the slope of Aventine ; three times he stormed 8.309. the rock-built gate in vain; and thrice withdrew 8.310. to rest him in the vale. But high above 8.311. a pointed peak arose, sheer face of rock 8.312. on every side, which towered into view 8.313. from the long ridge above the vaulted cave 8.314. fit haunt for birds of evil-boding wing. 8.315. This peak, which leftward toward the river leaned 8.316. he smote upon its right—his utmost blow — 8.317. breaking its bases Ioose; then suddenly 8.318. thrust at it: as he thrust, the thunder-sound 8.319. filled all the arching sky, the river's banks 8.320. asunder leaped, and Tiber in alarm 8.321. reversed his flowing wave. So Cacus' lair 8.322. lay shelterless, and naked to the day 8.323. the gloomy caverns of his vast abode 8.324. tood open, deeply yawning, just as if 8.325. the riven earth should crack, and open wide 8.326. th' infernal world and fearful kingdoms pale 8.327. which gods abhor; and to the realms on high 8.328. the measureless abyss should be laid bare 8.329. and pale ghosts shrink before the entering sun. 8.330. Now upon Cacus, startled by the glare 8.331. caged in the rocks and howling horribly 8.332. Alcides hurled his weapons, raining down 8.333. all sorts of deadly missiles—trunks of trees 8.334. and monstrous boulders from the mountain torn. 8.335. But when the giant from his mortal strait 8.336. no refuge knew, he blew from his foul jaws 8.337. a storm of smoke—incredible to tell — 8.338. and with thick darkness blinding every eye 8.339. concealed his cave, uprolling from below 8.340. one pitch-black night of mingled gloom and fire. 8.341. This would Alcides not endure, but leaped 8.342. headlong across the flames, where densest hung 8.343. the rolling smoke, and through the cavern surged 8.344. a drifting and impenetrable cloud. 8.345. With Cacus, who breathed unavailing flame 8.346. he grappled in the dark, locked limb with limb 8.347. and strangled him, till o'er the bloodless throat 8.348. the starting eyeballs stared. Then Hercules 8.349. burst wide the doorway of the sooty den 8.350. and unto Heaven and all the people showed 8.351. the stolen cattle and the robber's crimes 8.352. and dragged forth by the feet the shapeless corpse 8.353. of the foul monster slain. The people gazed 8.354. insatiate on the grewsome eyes, the breast 8.355. of bristling shag, the face both beast and man 8.356. and that fire-blasted throat whence breathed no more 8.357. the extinguished flame. 'T is since that famous day 8.358. we celebrate this feast, and glad of heart 8.359. each generation keeps the holy time. 8.360. Potitius began the worship due 8.361. and our Pinarian house is vowed to guard 8.362. the rites of Hercules. An altar fair 8.363. within this wood they raised; 't is called ‘the Great,’ 8.364. and Ara Maxima its name shall be. 8.365. Come now, my warriors, and bind your brows 8.366. with garlands worthy of the gift of Heaven. 8.367. Lift high the cup in every thankful hand 8.368. and praise our people's god with plenteous wine.” 8.369. He spoke; and of the poplar's changeful sheen 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods
16. Vergil, Eclogues, 4.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.10. Only do thou, at the boy's birth in whom
17. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
18. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 2.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Plutarch, Romulus, 12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Suetonius, Augustus, 7.2, 29.5, 94.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, homeric shield of Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 106, 108, 122
aedes bonae deae Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 116, 117, 119, 120
aedes herculis musarum Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 111, 112, 113, 119
aeneas, founder of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
aeneas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 120
ajax Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 108, 109, 110, 111
andromache Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 108, 109
aratus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 120, 121
areae Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
augustus, house of Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
augustus/octavian, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
authority, augustan Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
autocracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 120, 122
books Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 120, 122
campus martius, male and female spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
capitol, potency of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
capitoline hill Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
carinae Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
cattle in rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106, 273
cicero Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 120, 121
circus flaminius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 111, 119
compita (crossroads) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
cosmetics and womens fashion Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
cosmogony Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 105, 106, 110, 115
cosmology Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 105
crates of mallus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 106
crossroads (compita) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
culture and nature blended Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 273
cultus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
cultus vs. simplicitas/rusticitas Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79, 80
curia hostilia, replaced Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
deianira Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 113
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
elites Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 120
empedocleo-lucretian background in metamorphoses, four elements Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 106
empedocleo-lucretian background in metamorphoses, love/philia and strife/neikos Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 108
eustathius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 106
evanders rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
female spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106, 273
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
forum, cattle in Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106, 273
freudenburg, kirk, l. fulvius nobilior Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 112, 118
gee, emma Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 120, 121
golden age, ironic or parodic Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
hardie, alex Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 112, 113
hector Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 109, 111
heraclitus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 106
hercules, and cult of bona dea Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 116, 117, 120
hercules Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 107, 111, 112, 113, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120
hercules musagetes Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 112, 113, 118
hesiod Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 118
homer Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 106, 118
ideology Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
imago mundi shield tradition Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 105, 106, 110, 120
indeterminacy, strategies Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
intellectual progress, in cicero Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
interior spaces, caves Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 273
iole Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 111, 112, 113
janus in fasti Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 110, 115
juno regina, temple of Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 112
kraus, karl Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 104
l. marcius philippus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 112
livia, in ovid Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
love trysts, venues for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106, 273
male spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
medusa Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 123
militarism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
narrow streets Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
nature and culture, blended Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 273
oikeiosis Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 107, 122
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
ovid, as praeceptor amoris Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 120
ovid, cultus vs. simplicitas/rusticitas Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79, 80
ovid, on haircare Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 111
ovid, use of livia as moral exemplum Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
ovid, use of saecular discourse for moral exemplarity Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
ovid imagines rome from exile Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
palatine hill, palimpsestic view Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106, 273
palatine hill, seat of imperial power Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
palimpsestic rome, in augustan poets Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 273
palimpsestic rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 273
pandey, nandini Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 109
paraclausithyron Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 118
peace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
plato Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
plautus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 104
plutarch, and varro on the horoscopes of augustus and rome Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 207
pompey, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
portico of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
porticos, as venues for romance Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
porticus philippi Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 111, 112, 122
power, of the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
proculus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
progress narratives Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
propertius Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 117, 118
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 120, 122
regulus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
rimell, victoria Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 123
role reversal Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 120, 122
romance, venues for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106, 273
romulus, apotheosis of Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
rosati, gianpiero Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 104
sabine women Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
sabines Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 273
saeculum, progress narratives vs. decline narratives Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
scipio africanus the younger (interlocutor of cicero) Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
silence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 122
socrates Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 80
stoics/stoicism Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 105, 120, 121
tarutius Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 207
tatius Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
tecmessa Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 108, 109
temples and shrines, of apollo palatinus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 79
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 120, 122
theatres, for romantic pursuit Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106, 273
topography of rome, from ovid Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 106
triumph, as an imperial monopoly' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 211
ulysses Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 110
varro of reate, synchronized the horoscopes of augustus and rome Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 207
vergil, vesta, temple of Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 121
vergil Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 106, 107, 118