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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8581
Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 2.297-2.302


Sive erit in Tyriis, Tyrios laudabis amictus:And watch the wanton hours, and time her praise.


rend=When servants merry make, and feast, and play, This has allusion to a festival celebrated at Rome by the servants, in remembrance of a great piece of service their predecessors had done the Romans, soon after the invasion of the Gauls; the time of celebrating it was in July. It was done in honour of Juno Caprotina according to Macrobius, in his Saturnalia, book i. chap. 2. The free maidens and servants, says the same author, sacrificed on that day to Juno, under a wild fig-tree, called in Latin Caprilicus, in memory of that complaisant virtue which inspired the servant maids to expose themselves to the lust and revenge of the enemy for the preservation of the public honour. For after the Gauls had taken the city, and were driven out again, when things were restored to their former order, the neighbouring nations believing the Romans were very much weakened by the late invasion, siege, and sack, took hold of that opportunity to invade them, choosing Posthumius Livius of Fidenes for their chief, and demanded of the senate, that if they would preserve their city and authority, they should send them their wives and daughters. The senators taking the matter into consideration, could not tell what answer to return. They knew their own weakness and the strength of their enemies; and in this uncertainty a servant-maid called Tutelar, or Philotis. offered to go with some other maids of the same condition to the enemy. This proposal was generally liked, and accordingly the maids were dressed like the wives of the senators, and the daughters of free citizens, and went weeping to put themselves into the hands of the invaders. Livius ordered them to be dispersed into several quarters; and, as they had agreed among themselves, they tempted their new husbands to drink, pretending that day ought to be celebrated as a festival; and when they were almost dead drunk they gave the Romans a signal from the top of a fig-tree to fall on. The latter were encamped not far off; and at this signal they assautled and easily mastered the enemy's camp. putting most of them to the sword. The senate, to reward this important service, ordered that the servants should be made free, that they should have portions paid to them out of the public treasury, and allowed them to wear the ornaments they had taken. The day on which this happy expedition was executed, was called the Caprotine nones, from the wild fig-tree Caprificus, from whence the signa was given to the Romans to sally out and gain so glorious a victory; in remembrance of which action the servants sacrificed every year under this or some other fig-tree. Plutarch relates the same story in the life of Camillus .


Aurata est? ipso tibi sit pretiosior auro;Then give her something to keep holiday.


rend=Retain them ev'ry one, the porter most


rend=She leaves off her tunic, cry: ‘You set me on fire’, but request her anxiously to beware of chills. She’s parted her hair: praise the parting: she waves her hair: be pleased with the waves. Admire her limbs as she dances, her voice when she sings, and when it finishes, grieve that it’s finished in words. It’s fine if you tell her what delights, and what gives joy about her lovemaking, her skill in bed. Though she’s more violent than fierce Medusa, she’ll be ‘kind and gentle’ to her lover.


Astiterit tunicata, 'moves incendia' clamaAnd her who nightly guards the happy coast


rend=I no profuse nor costly gifts commend


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Ovid, Amores, 1.5.9-1.5.14, 1.7.47-1.7.48, 3.1.7-3.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.21-1.22, 1.31-1.32, 2.298-2.302, 3.169-3.192, 3.273 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Ovid, Fasti, 1.405-1.410, 2.319-2.324 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.405. There were Naiads too, some with uncombed flowing hair 1.406. Others with their tresses artfully bound. 1.407. One attends with tunic tucked high above the knee 1.408. Another shows her breast through her loosened robe: 1.409. One bares her shoulder: another trails her hem in the grass 1.410. Their tender feet are not encumbered with shoes. 2.319. She gave him thin vests dyed in Gaetulian purple 2.320. Gave him the elegant zone that had bound her waist. 2.321. The zone was too small for his belly, and he unfastened 2.322. The clasps of the vests to thrust out his great hands. 2.323. He fractured her bracelets, not made for such arms 2.324. And his giant feet split the little shoes.
4. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.15, 4.7.40-4.7.41, 4.11.61 (1st cent. BCE

5. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.10.61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.215-4.217, 9.616 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.215. of woodland creatures; the wild goats are seen 4.216. from pointed crag descending leap by leap 4.217. down the steep ridges; in the vales below 9.616. have lasting music, no remotest age
7. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.360-2.364 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 11.77, 33.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 2.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ancilla (female slave) (andromeda Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
argenteus (silver) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
aristotle Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 387, 390
azure (colour) ( Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
candidus (white) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 436
chestnut Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
children Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
coa vestis Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214, 387, 388, 390
colour Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413, 436
corinna Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388
epicurean doctrine Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 390
epigram (literary genre) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
fabric Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388, 395
flavian period (literature, dress) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
fortunata (wife of trimalchio) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
gausapum(feltedwoollen cloth) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 395
grus (crane, flamingo) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
isidore of sevilla Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214
linen Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214
love/lovers (stereotypes) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388
lucretius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214, 390
luxury Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214, 222, 387, 388, 413, 436
marcia Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
martial Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 395
matrona Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
melitenses, vestes Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214
mitra (headscarf) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
naked Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388
nephele (goddess) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
niveus (white) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 436
nudus (naked) (nymph Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 387, 388, 390, 395, 413, 436
ovid, ars and remedia as philosophical in their own right Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 130
ovid, as praeceptor amoris Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 130
ovid, erotodidaxis similar to philosophy in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 130
ovid, philosophy as ars uitae Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 130
ovid Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
petronius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
philosophy as a way of life Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 130
pink Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388
propertius Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 388, 413
proust, marcel Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388
red ( Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 436
ripert, émile Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 130
rose (colour) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388
saffron Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
seneca Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 130
silk Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214, 387, 388, 390
silk worm Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 387
sky (colour) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
stereotypes vii Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 390, 413
synthesis (garment) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
translucent Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 387
trica (triclinium (trimalchio Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
turquoise Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
valerius maximus Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
veil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222
vergil Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 214
violarius (violet (' Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 388
violarius (violet ( Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 413
weave Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 387
wool, woollen Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 222, 395