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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8581
Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.213-1.228


Ergo erit illa dies, qua tu, pulcherrime rerumCelestial seeds shoot out before their day


rend=Prevent their years, and brook no dull delay.


Ibunt ante duces onerati colla catenisThus infant Hercules the snakes did press


rend=And in his cradle did his sire confess.


Spectabunt laeti iuvenes mixtaeque puellaeBacchus a boy, yet like a hero fought


rend=And early spoils from conquer'd India brought.


Atque aliqua ex illis cum regum nomina quaeretThus you your father's troops shall lead to fight


rend=And thus shall vanquish in your father's right.


rend=what place, what mountains, and what stream’s displayed, you can reply to all, and more if she asks: and what you don’t know, reply as memory prompts. That’s Euphrates, his brow crowned with reeds: that’ll be Tigris with the long green hair. I make those Armenians, that’s Persia’s Danaan crown: that was a town in the hills of Achaemenia. Him and him, they’re generals: and say what names they have, if you can, the true ones, if not the most fitting. The table laid for a feast also gives you an opening:


Omnia responde, nec tantum siqua rogabit;These rudiments you to your lineage owe;


rend=Born to increase your titles as you grow.


Hic est Euphrates, praecinctus harundine frontem:Brethren you had, revenge your brethren slain;


rend=You have a father, and his rights maintain.


Hos facito Armenios; haec est Danaëia Persis:Arm'd by your country's parent and your own


rend=Redeem your country and restore his throne.


Ille vel ille, duces; et erunt quae nomina dicasYour enemies assert an impious cause;


rend=You fight both for divine and human laws.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 20, 14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.72-1.75 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.67-1.100, 1.103-1.106, 1.131, 1.135-1.170, 1.179, 1.181, 1.203-1.205, 1.209-1.212, 1.214-1.228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Tristia, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE

7. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
8. Cebes of Thebes, Cebetis Tabula, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 7.37-7.38, 7.139-7.140, 7.142-7.143, 7.146, 7.158 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7.37. For we had arms, and walls, and fortresses so prepared as not to be easily taken, and courage not to be moved by any dangers in the cause of liberty, which encouraged us all to revolt from the Romans. 7.37. 1. While Titus was at Caesarea, he solemnized the birthday of his brother [Domitian] after a splendid manner, and inflicted a great deal of the punishment intended for the Jews in honor of him; 7.38. But since we had a generous hope that deluded us, as if we might perhaps have been able to avenge ourselves on our enemies on that account, though it be now become vanity, and hath left us alone in this distress, let us make haste to die bravely. Let us pity ourselves, our children, and our wives while it is in our own power to show pity to them; 7.38. for the number of those that were now slain in fighting with the beasts, and were burnt, and fought with one another, exceeded two thousand five hundred. Yet did all this seem to the Romans, when they were thus destroyed ten thousand several ways, to be a punishment beneath their deserts. 7.139. But what afforded the greatest surprise of all was the structure of the pageants that were borne along; for indeed he that met them could not but be afraid that the bearers would not be able firmly enough to support them, such was their magnitude; 7.142. and many resemblances of the war, and those in several ways, and variety of contrivances, affording a most lively portraiture of itself. 7.143. For there was to be seen a happy country laid waste, and entire squadrons of enemies slain; while some of them ran away, and some were carried into captivity; with walls of great altitude and magnitude overthrown and ruined by machines; with the strongest fortifications taken, and the walls of most populous cities upon the tops of hills seized on 7.146. Now the workmanship of these representations was so magnificent and lively in the construction of the things, that it exhibited what had been done to such as did not see it, as if they had been there really present. 7.158. 7. After these triumphs were over, and after the affairs of the Romans were settled on the surest foundations, Vespasian resolved to build a temple to Peace, which was finished in so short a time, and in so glorious a manner, as was beyond all human expectation and opinion:
10. Juvenal, Satires, 6.156-6.157 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 89, 88 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 89, 88 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.84, 36.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Statius, Siluae, 4.6.59 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 45.6.4, 53.2.4, 54.6.6, 55.10.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

45.6.4.  After this came the festival appointed in honour of the completion of the temple of Venus, which some, while Caesar was still alive, had promised to celebrate, but were now holding in slight regard, even as they did the games in the Circus in honour of the Parilia; so, to win the favour of the populace, he provided for it at his private expense, on the ground that it concerned him because of his family. 53.2.4.  As for religious matters, he did not allow the Egyptian rites to be celebrated inside the pomerium, but made provision for the temples; those which had been built by private individuals he ordered their sons and descendants, if any survived, to repair, and the rest he restored himself. 54.6.6.  Agrippa, then, checked whatever other ailments he found still festering, and curtailed the Egyptian rites which were again invading the city, forbidding anyone to perform them even in the suburbs within one mile of the city. And when a disturbance arose over the election of the prefect of the city, the official chosen on account of the Feriae, he did not succeed in quelling it, but they went through that year without this official.   55.10.2.  . . . to Mars, and that he himself and his grandsons should go there as often as they wished, while those who were passing from the class of boys and were being enrolled among the youths of military age should invariably do so; that those who were sent out to commands abroad should make that their starting-point;
16. Lucian, Amores, 8, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Lucian, Hercules, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. For a long time I stood staring at this in amazement: I knew not what to make of it, and was beginning to feel somewhat nettled, when I was addressed in admirable Greek by a Gaul who stood at my side, and who besides possessing a scholarly acquaintance with the Gallic mythology, proved to be not unfamiliar with our own. ‘Sir,’ he said, ‘I see this picture puzzles you: let me solve the riddle. We Gauls connect eloquence not with Hermes, as you do, but with the mightier Heracles. Nor need it surprise you to see him represented as an old man. It is the prerogative of eloquence, that it reaches perfection in old age; at least if we may believe your poets, who tell us thatYouth is the sport of every random gust,whereas old ageHath that to say that passes youthful wit.Thus we find that from Nestor’s lips honey is distilled; and that the words of the Trojan counsellors are compared to the lily, which, if I have not forgotten my Greek, is the name of a flower.
18. Philostratus, Pictures, None (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

19. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 16.10.14 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

16.10.14. For he did not (as in the case of other cities) permit the contests to be terminated at his own discretion, but left them (as the custom is) to various chances. Then, as he surveyed the sections of the city and its suburbs, lying within the summits of the seven hills, along their slopes, or on level ground, he thought that whatever first met his gaze towered above all the rest: the sanctuaries of Tarpeian Jove so far surpassing as things divine excel those of earth; the baths built up to the measure of provinces; the huge bulk of the amphitheatre, strengthened by its framework of Tiburtine stone, Travertine. to whose top human eyesight barely ascends; the Pantheon like a rounded city-district, Regio here refers to one of the regions, or districts, into which the city was divided. vaulted over in lofty beauty; and the exalted heights which rise with platforms to which one may mount, and bear the likenesses of former emperors; The columns of Trajan, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. The platform at the top was reached by a stairway within the column. the Temple of the City, The double temple of Venus and Roma, built by Hadriian and dedicated in A.D. 135 the Forum of Peace, The Forum Pacis, or Vespasiani, was begun by Vespasian in A.D. 71, after the taking of Jerusalem, and dedicated in 75. It lay behind the basilica Aemilia. the Theatre of Pompey, Built in 55 B.C. in the Campus Martius. the Oleum, A building for musical performances, erected by Domitian, probably near his Stadium. the Stadium, The Stadium of Domitian in the Campus Martius, the shape and size of which is almost exactly preserved by the modern Piazza Navona. and amongst these the other adornments of the Eternal City.
20. Callistratus, Staturam Descriptiones, 6.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agrippa, map of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176
agrippa Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 181
alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177
ara pacis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181
armenia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
audiences, popular Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 182, 215
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 214, 215
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 183, 214, 223
augustus/octavian, as collective construction Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
augustus/octavian, as pater patriae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 181
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183
augustus/octavian, constitutional status of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
augustus/octavian, need for presence across empire Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
augustus/octavian, relation with caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 212
authorial intention Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 214, 215
authority, mutual constitution of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
authority, poetic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 183, 214
belatedness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212
collaborative authorship Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
cornelius sulla, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
cosmopolis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 182, 213
costs of war Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183
danaë Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 180, 182, 213, 215
encolpius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
eumolpus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
euphrates river Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
exēgētai Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 182
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 213, 215
gaius caesar Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 264
guides Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
hannibal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
hegemony Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 178
hercules Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
hermeneutic, guides Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
ideology Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212, 215
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176, 223
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 180, 183
indeterminacy, horace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
indeterminacy, strategies Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 183
information, scarcity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
information, transmission across distance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 223
interpretive community Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
licinius Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 256
linear and cyclical conceptions of time and space Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 182
literacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182
livia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 180
livy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
lucius caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
lucretius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
maps and mapping Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 181, 182, 183
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 179, 180, 235
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 183, 215
marriage laws Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181
mars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 177
masculinity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 177, 178, 180
menestratus, his hecate Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
menestratus, his hercules Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
metaliterariness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 214, 215
militarism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 213
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 235
naumachia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 174, 175, 176
objects, viewer understanding of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
octavia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
ovid, and triumphal processions Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
paintings Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 256
parade of heroes Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 223
parthian standards Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 178
peace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212, 213
performance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
periēgetai Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
persia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
personification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 182
poets, as prophets Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 183
poets, service to empire Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213, 223
pompey Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
power, of artists and authors Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 214, 215
presence/absence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176, 235
prophecy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 180, 213
provinces Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215, 223
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
revisionary, verbs of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
revisionary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175
rhetoric Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 183
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 178, 180, 223
rivers, euphrates Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 214
rivers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 214
role reversal Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212, 213, 235
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 182, 183
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174
romanization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 213, 214, 215
silence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 176
subjective fallacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
succession Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 213, 235
symmachus Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 256
temple, of mars ultor Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 179
temple Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174
tiberius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 180, 235
tigris river Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
titus Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 256
transience Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
triumph, as an imperial monopoly Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213, 214
triumph, servus publicus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
triumphs, artwork of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 256
vengeance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 181, 182
venus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 174, 175
vespasian, triumph of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 256
viewers, and literacy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 119
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213, 214, 223
voice Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
women Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175
world' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212
world Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176, 213