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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8581
Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.179


Parthe, dabis poenas: Crassi gaudete sepultiTouch any thing of hers, and if her train


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Horace, Odes, 3.2.13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.72-1.75 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.67-1.170, 1.181, 1.203-1.206, 1.209-1.228, 1.263, 3.385-3.398 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Fasti, 2.683-2.684 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.683. The lands of other races have fixed boundaries: 2.684. The extent of the City of Rome and the world is one.
6. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.760-2.832, 8.533, 8.730-8.732, 8.735-8.778 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Tristia, 2.253-2.312, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4, 4.6.1, 4.6.3-4.6.7 (1st cent. BCE

9. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
10. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 45.6.4, 53.2.4, 54.6.6, 55.10.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

45.6.4.  After this came the festival appointed in honour of the completion of the temple of Venus, which some, while Caesar was still alive, had promised to celebrate, but were now holding in slight regard, even as they did the games in the Circus in honour of the Parilia; so, to win the favour of the populace, he provided for it at his private expense, on the ground that it concerned him because of his family. 53.2.4.  As for religious matters, he did not allow the Egyptian rites to be celebrated inside the pomerium, but made provision for the temples; those which had been built by private individuals he ordered their sons and descendants, if any survived, to repair, and the rest he restored himself. 54.6.6.  Agrippa, then, checked whatever other ailments he found still festering, and curtailed the Egyptian rites which were again invading the city, forbidding anyone to perform them even in the suburbs within one mile of the city. And when a disturbance arose over the election of the prefect of the city, the official chosen on account of the Feriae, he did not succeed in quelling it, but they went through that year without this official.   55.10.2.  . . . to Mars, and that he himself and his grandsons should go there as often as they wished, while those who were passing from the class of boys and were being enrolled among the youths of military age should invariably do so; that those who were sent out to commands abroad should make that their starting-point;


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achelous Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
agrippa, map of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176
agrippa Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 181
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177
ara pacis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181
audiences, popular Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 182, 215
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 214, 215
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 183, 214, 223
augustus/octavian, as collective construction Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
augustus/octavian, as pater patriae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 181
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183
augustus/octavian, constitutional status of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
augustus/octavian, need for presence across empire Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
augustus/octavian, relation with caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 212
authorial intention Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 214, 215
authority, mutual constitution of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
authority, poetic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 183, 214
belatedness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180
callimacheanism, callimachean models, roman appropriation of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
callimacheanism, roman Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
callimachus, and latin poets Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212
collaborative authorship Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
cosmopolis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 182, 213
costs of war Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 180, 182, 213, 215
envy Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
erysichthon Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
euphrates Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 182
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 213, 215
hecaleius, influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
hegemony Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 178
hermeneutic, guides Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
hunger Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
hymn 6 to demeter Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
ideology Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212, 215
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176, 223
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 180, 183
indeterminacy, horace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
indeterminacy, strategies Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174, 183
information, scarcity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
information, transmission across distance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 223
interpretive community Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183
intertextuality, of latin poets and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
linear and cyclical conceptions of time and space Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 182
literacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182
livia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 180
livy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
lucilius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
lucius caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
lucretius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
maps and mapping Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 181, 182, 183
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 179, 180, 235
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 183, 215
marriage laws Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181
mars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 177
masculinity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 177, 178, 180
metaliterariness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 214, 215
metapoetics, and criticism of latin poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
militarism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 213
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 235
naumachia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 174, 175, 176
octavia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
ovid Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
parade of heroes Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 223
parthian standards Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 178
peace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212, 213
performance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
personification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 182
poets, and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
poets, as prophets Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 183
poets, service to empire Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213, 223
pompey Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
power, of artists and authors Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 214, 215
presence/absence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176, 235
propertius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523
prophecy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 180, 213
provinces Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215, 223
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
revisionary, verbs of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
revisionary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175
rhetoric Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 183
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 178, 180, 223
rivers, euphrates Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 214
rivers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 214
role reversal Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212, 213, 235
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174, 175, 182, 183
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174
romanization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 174
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 213, 214, 215
silence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175, 176
subjective fallacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 215
succession Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 180, 213, 235
temple, of mars ultor Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 179
temple Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 172, 173, 174
tiberius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 180, 235
transience Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
triumph, as an imperial monopoly Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213, 214
triumph, servus publicus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 235
vengeance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 177, 181, 182
venus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 174, 175
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213, 214, 223
voice Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 223
women Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 175
world' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213
world Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 176, 212
zeugma Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 523