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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8580
Ovid, Amores, 1.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 27-28, 525-529, 615, 26 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

26. of Helicon, and in those early day
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.1, 15.256 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.1. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 15.256. /sent forth from Ida to stand by thy side and succour thee, even me, Phoebus Apollo of the golden sword, that of old ever protect thee, thyself and the steep citadel withal. But come now, bid thy many charioteers drive against the hollow ships their swift horses
3. Homer, Odyssey, 1.1, 11.287-11.298, 15.225-15.242 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 515, 514 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

514. Another cunning art – the pipes, whose sound
5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 208-215, 207 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

207. of the unending gifts divinitie
6. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 1051-1054, 1050 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1050. ἄστρων διόδους· εἴς τε κελαινὸν 1050. of the stars in heaven; and let him lift me on high and hurl me down to black Tartarus with the swirling floods of stern Necessity: do what he will, me he shall never bring to death. Hermes
7. Plautus, Amphitruo, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-152, 16-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

8. Catullus, Poems, 1.9-1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Horace, Odes, 3.30, 4.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.15. he was then immediately surrounded with his own men. But the Romans were excited to set about the siege, by their indignation on the king’s account, and by their fear on their own account 4.15. They also set the principal men at variance one with another, by several sorts of contrivances and tricks, and gained the opportunity of doing what they pleased, by the mutual quarrels of those who might have obstructed their measures; till at length, when they were satiated with the unjust actions they had done towards men, they transferred their contumelious behavior to God himself, and came into the sanctuary with polluted feet.
10. Horace, Sermones, 1.10.31-1.10.39 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Ovid, Amores, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Ovid, Fasti, 5.1-5.110, 5.663-5.678, 5.681-5.692 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5.1. You ask where I think the name of May comes from? 5.2. Its origin’s not totally clear to me. 5.3. As a traveller stands unsure which way to go 5.4. Seeing the paths fan out in all directions 5.5. So I’m not sure which to accept, since it’s possible 5.6. To give different reasons: plenty itself confuses. 5.7. You who haunt the founts of Aganippian Hippocrene 5.8. Those beloved prints of the Medusaean horse, explain! 5.9. The goddesses are in conflict. Polyhymnia begins 5.10. While the others silently consider her speech. 5.11. ‘After the first Chaos, as soon as the three primary form 5.12. Were given to the world, all things were newly re-configured: 5.13. Earth sank under its own weight, and drew down the seas 5.14. But lightness lifted the sky to the highest regions: 5.15. And the sun and stars, not held back by their weight 5.16. And you, you horses of the moon, sprang high. 5.17. But Earth for a long time wouldn’t yield to Sky 5.18. Nor the other lights to the Sun: honours were equal. 5.19. One of the common crowd of gods, would often dare 5.20. To sit on the throne that you, Saturn, owned 5.21. None of the new gods took Ocean’s side 5.22. And Themis was relegated to the lowest place 5.23. Until Honour, and proper Reverence, she 5.24. of the calm look, were united in a lawful bed. 5.25. From them Majesty was born, she considers them 5.26. Her parents, she who was noble from her day of birth. 5.27. She took her seat, at once, high in the midst of Olympus 5.28. Conspicuous, golden, in her purple folds. 5.29. Modesty and Fear sat with her: you could see 5.30. All the gods modelling their expression on hers. 5.31. At once, respect for honour entered their minds: 5.32. The worthy had their reward, none thought of self. 5.33. This state of things lasted for years in heaven 5.34. Till the elder god was banished by fate from the citadel. 5.35. Earth bore the Giants, a fierce brood of savage monsters 5.36. Who dared to venture against Jupiter’s halls: 5.37. She gave them a thousands hands, serpents for legs 5.38. And said: “Take up arms against the mighty gods.” 5.39. They set to piling mountains to the highest stars 5.40. And to troubling mighty Jupiter with war: 5.41. He hurled lightning bolts from the heavenly citadel 5.42. And overturned the weighty mass on its creators. 5.43. These divine weapons protected Majesty well 5.44. She survived, and has been worshipped ever since: 5.45. So she attends on Jove, Jove’s truest guardian 5.46. And allows him to hold the sceptre without force. 5.47. She came to earth as well: Romulus and Numa 5.48. Both worshipped her, and so did others in later ages. 5.49. She maintains fathers and mothers in due honour 5.50. She keeps company with virgins and young boys 5.51. She burnishes the lictor’s rods, axes, and ivory chair 5.52. She rides high in triumph behind the garlanded horses.’ 5.53. Polyhymnia finished speaking: Clio, and Thalia 5.54. Mistress of the curved lyre, approved her words. 5.55. Urania continued: all the rest were silent 5.56. And hers was the only voice that could be heard. 5.57. ‘Once great reverence was shown to white hair 5.58. And wrinkled age was valued at its true worth. 5.59. The young waged work of war, and spirited battle 5.60. Holding to their posts for the sake of the gods: 5.61. Age, inferior in strength, and unfit for arms 5.62. often did the country a service by its counsel. 5.63. The Senate was only open to men of mature age 5.64. And Senators bear a name meaning ripe in years. 5.65. The elders made laws for the people, and specific 5.66. Rules governed the age when office might be sought: 5.67. Old men walked with the young, without their indignation 5.68. And on the inside, if they only had one companion. 5.69. Who dared then to talk shamefully in an older man’ 5.70. Presence? Old age granted rights of censorship. 5.71. Romulus knew this, and chose the City Father 5.72. From select spirits: making them the rulers of the City. 5.73. So I deduce that the elders (maiores) gave their own title 5.74. To the month of May: and looked after their own interests. 5.75. Numitor too may have said: “Romulus, grant this month 5.76. To the old men” and his grandson may have yielded. 5.77. The following month, June, named for young men (iuvenes) 5.78. Gives no slight proof of the honour intended.’ 5.79. Then Calliope herself, first of that choir, her hair 5.80. Unkempt and wreathed with ivy, began to speak: 5.81. ‘Tethys, the Titaness, was married long ago to Ocean 5.82. He who encircles the outspread earth with flowing water. 5.83. The story is that their daughter Pleione was united 5.84. To sky-bearing Atlas, and bore him the Pleiades. 5.85. Among them, Maia’s said to have surpassed her sister 5.86. In beauty, and to have slept with mighty Jove. 5.87. She bore Mercury, who cuts the air on winged feet 5.88. On the cypress-clothed ridge of Mount Cyllene. 5.89. The Arcadians, and swift Ladon, and vast Maenalus 5.90. A land thought older than the moon, rightly worship him. 5.91. Evander, in exile from Arcadia, came to the Latin fields 5.92. And brought his gods with him, aboard ship. 5.93. Where Rome, the capital of the world, now stand 5.94. There were trees, grass, a few sheep, the odd cottage. 5.95. When they arrived, his prophetic mother said: 5.96. “Halt here! This rural spot will be the place of Empire.” 5.97. The Arcadian hero obeyed his mother, the prophetess 5.98. And stayed, though a stranger in a foreign land. 5.99. He taught the people many rites, but, above all, those 5.100. of twin-horned Faunus, and Mercury the wing-footed god. 5.101. Faunus half-goat, you’re worshipped by the girded Luperci 5.102. When their strips of hide purify the crowded streets. 5.103. But you, Mercury, patron of thieves, inventor 5.104. of the curved lyre, gave your mother’s name to this month. 5.105. Nor was this your first act of piety: you’re thought 5.106. To have given the lyre seven strings, the Pleiads’ number.’ 5.107. Calliope too ended: and her sisters voiced their praise. 5.108. And so? All three were equally convincing. 5.109. May the Muses’ favour attend me equally 5.110. And let me never praise one more than the rest. 5.663. Tiber spoke, entering a moist cave of natural stone 5.664. While you, gentle waters, checked your flow. 5.665. Come, Mercury, Atlas’ famous grandson, you whom 5.666. A Pleiad once bore to Jove, among the Arcadian hills 5.667. Arbiter of war and peace to gods on high, and those below: 5.668. You who make your way with winged feet: who delight 5.669. In the sounding lyre, and the gleaming wrestling: 5.670. You through whose teaching the tongue learnt eloquence: 5.671. On the Ides, the Senate founded for you, a temple facing 5.672. The Circus: since then today has been your festival. 5.673. All those who make a living trading their wares 5.674. offer you incense, and beg you to swell their profits. 5.675. There’s Mercury’s fountain close to the Capene Gate: 5.676. It’s potent, if you believe those who’ve tried it. 5.677. Here the merchant, cleansed, with his tunic girt 5.678. Draws water and carries it off, in a purified jar. 5.681. And he sprinkles his hair with dripping laurel too 5.682. And with that voice, that often deceives, utters prayers: 5.683. ‘Wash away all the lies of the past,’ he says 5.684. ‘Wash away all the perjured words of a day that’s gone. 5.685. If I’ve called on you as witness, and falsely invoked 5.686. Jove’s great power, hoping he wouldn’t hear: 5.687. If I’ve knowingly taken the names of gods and goddesses 5.688. In vain: let the swift southerlies steal my sinful words 5.689. And leave the day clear for me, for further perjuries 5.690. And let the gods above fail to notice I’ve uttered any. 5.691. Just grant me my profit, give me joy of the profit I’ve made: 5.692. And make sure I’ll have the pleasure of cheating a buyer.’
13. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.452-1.567, 5.365-5.379 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Ovid, Tristia, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Propertius, Elegies, 1.3.14, 3.3.13-3.3.14, 3.3.16, 3.3.19-3.3.20, 3.3.23-3.3.24, 3.3.26, 4.1.3-4.1.4, 4.1.133-4.1.136 (1st cent. BCE

16. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. Arms and the man I sing, who first made way
17. Vergil, Eclogues, 6.3-6.5, 6.7-6.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.3. the woods to house her. When I sought to tell 6.4. of battles and of kings, the Cynthian god 6.5. plucked at mine ear and warned me: “Tityrus 6.7. but sing a slender song.” Now, Varus, I— 6.8. for lack there will not who would laud thy deeds
18. Vergil, Georgics, 4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

19. Martial, Epigrams, 14.186 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Martial, Epigrams, 14.186 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Philostratus, Pictures, 1.26 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

22. Callimachus, Hymns, 2.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adultery, roman Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 347
aeneas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
aetia (callimachus), book, callimachus, aetia, book 1, influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
agon / agonistic Mayor, Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals (2017) 154
alcaeus, hymn to hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142, 145
alcaeus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 142, 145
alexandrianism Mayor, Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals (2017) 154
amores (ovid) Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167; Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
amphitryon Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
ancient and modern, polarization between Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
antoninus liberalis Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142
anxiety, artistic Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
aphrodite Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142
apollo, and augustan poets Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
apollo, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 145
apollo Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 142, 144, 145
ars amatoria (ovid) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
battus/battos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142
beginnings, importance of Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 71, 72
beginnings, in epic Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 71
book, and immortality of poet Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168
bookroll, damage to from use Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167
callimacheanism, callimachean models, roman appropriation of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
callimacheanism, roman Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
callimachus, and latin poets Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
callimachus/callimachos/kallimachos, hymn to delos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142
callimachus/callimachos/kallimachos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
calliope, song of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
catullus, and ancients vs. moderns Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
catullus, and anxiety over books fate Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168
catullus, passer Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167
contests, territory as motive for Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
cupid-apollo quarrel Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142, 144, 145
cupid Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 142, 144, 145, 166
cupid (see also apollo vs. cupid) Mayor, Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals (2017) 154
daphne Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 144
didactic, persona Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
emathides, punishment of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
epigrams, of ovid Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167
epigrams (callimachus), influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
epigraphs Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
epos / epic Mayor, Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals (2017) 154
eros Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142
erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 142, 144, 145
erotic poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
errare, error Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
exile (relegation), as context for creation of works Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
fasti (ovid), calendrical tradition and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
fasti (ovid) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
faunus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
genre, literary, hierarchy of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
hades Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
herdsman, and the lyre Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 145
herdsman, as psychopomp Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
hermes, and bow theft Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 145
hermes, and comedy Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
hermes, as cattle thief Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142, 144, 145
hermes, as go-between Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
hesiod Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
hierarchy, of literary genres Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
historiography, beginnings Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 72
homer Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
homeric hymns Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
horace, odes Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 145, 166
horace Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 145, 166
hubris, artistic arrogance Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
hymn '2 to apollo, influence" '758.0_519@ovid Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
imitation Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
intertextuality, of latin poets and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
jupiter (zeus), rapes by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
laurel Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141
linked to, of venus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
love poets, roman Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
martial, on bookrolls Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167
masculinity, roman' Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 347
masculinity, roman Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 346
masks Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
mercury/hermes, and venus/aphrodite Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142
mercury/hermes, in horace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
mercury/hermes, in plautus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
metamorphoses (ovid) Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168
metapoetics, and criticism of latin poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
minerva Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 145
muses, imperialism linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
muses, in hesiod Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
muses, ovids characterizations of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
nepos, cornelius Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168
nicander Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142
novels Goldhill, Preposterous Poetics: The Politics and Aesthetics of Form in Late Antiquity (2020) 72
ovid, amores Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 142, 144, 145
ovid, and epigram Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167
ovid, fasti Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142, 144, 145
ovid, metamorphoses Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168
ovid, on immortality of poet Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141, 142, 144, 145
passer (catullus) Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 167
patrons of the arts Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
pes / foot Mayor, Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals (2017) 154
pierides Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
plautus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
poet, immortality of through book Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 168
poets, and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
poets, love poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
poets, muses as patrons of poets Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
politics, rapes as political acts Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
politics, venus described in political terms Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
programmatic writing, augustan poets, and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
prometheus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
propertius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519
proserpina (persephone), rape of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65, 72
proserpina by, as victim ofvenus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
proserpina by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
rapes, as political act Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
roman comedy Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 166
silence, as punishment Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 72
typhoeus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
venus, empire of eros Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
venus, imperialism linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65
venus, rape of proserpina as act of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 65, 72
venus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 142, 145
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 314
vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 141
virgil Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 519