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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8490
Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 567
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Aristophanes, Clouds, 606 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

606. κωμαστὴς Διόνυσος.
2. Aristophanes, Frogs, 357, 1032 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1032. ̓Ορφεὺς μὲν γὰρ τελετάς θ' ἡμῖν κατέδειξε φόνων τ' ἀπέχεσθαι
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 491 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

491. ὡς θρασὺς ὁ βάκχος κοὐκ ἀγύμναστος λόγων. Διόνυσος 491. How bold the Bacchant is, and not unpracticed in speaking! Dionysu
4. Euripides, Fragments, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Ion, 717-719, 716 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

782c. Ath. The custom of men sacrificing one another is, in fact, one that survives even now among many peoples; whereas amongst others we hear of how the opposite custom existed, when they were forbidden so much as to eat an ox, and their offerings to the gods consisted, not of animals, but of cakes of meal and grain steeped in honey, and other such bloodless sacrifices, and from flesh they abstained as though it were unholy to eat it or to stain with blood the altars of the gods; instead of that, those of us men who then existed lived what is called an Orphic life, keeping wholly to iimate food and
7. Sophocles, Antigone, 154, 153 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Horace, Ars Poetica, 391 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.54.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.54.5. The road from Tegea to Argos is very well suited for carriages, in fact a first-rate highway. On the road come first a temple and image of Asclepius. Next, turning aside to the left for about a stade, you see a dilapidated sanctuary of Apollo surnamed Pythian which is utterly in ruins. Along the straight road there are many oaks, and in the grove of oaks is a temple of Demeter called “in Corythenses.” Hard by is another sanctuary, that of Mystic Dionysus.
11. Origen, Against Celsus, 8.30 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.30. For that which is offered to idols is sacrificed to demons, and a man of God must not join the table of demons. As to things strangled, we are forbidden by Scripture to partake of them, because the blood is still in them; and blood, especially the odour arising from blood, is said to be the food of demons. Perhaps, then, if we were to eat of strangled animals, we might have such spirits feeding along with us. And the reason which forbids the use of strangled animals for food is also applicable to the use of blood. And it may not be amiss, as bearing on this point, to recall a beautiful saying in the writings of Sextus, which is known to most Christians: The eating of animals, says he, is a matter of indifference; but to abstain from them is more agreeable to reason. It is not, therefore, simply an account of some traditions of our fathers that we refrain from eating victims offered to those called gods or heroes or demons, but for other reasons, some of which I have here mentioned. It is not to be supposed, however, that we are to abstain from the flesh of animals in the same way as we are bound to abstain from all race and wickedness: we are indeed to abstain not only from the flesh of animals, but from all other kinds of food, if we cannot partake of them without incurring evil, and the consequences of evil. For we are to avoid eating for gluttony, or for the mere gratification of the appetite, without regard to the health and sustece of the body. We do not believe that souls pass from one body to another, and that they may descend so low as to enter the bodies of the brutes. If we abstain at times from eating the flesh of animals, it is evidently, therefore, not for the same reason as Pythagoras; for it is the reasonable soul alone that we honour, and we commit its bodily organs with due honours to the grave. For it is not right that the dwelling-place of the rational soul should be cast aside anywhere without honour, like the carcasses of brute beasts; and so much the more when we believe that the respect paid to the body redounds to the honour of the person who received from God a soul which has nobly employed the organs of the body in which it resided. In regard to the question, How are the dead raised up, and with what body do they come? we have already answered it briefly, as our purpose required.
12. Jerome, Adversus Jovinianum, 2.14 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

13. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 625, 627, 653-655, 564

14. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 45.2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antiphanes Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
aristophanes Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
baccheia βακχεία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
bacchus, βάκχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
bernabé, a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
boeotia, boeotian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
casadio, g. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
celsus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 351
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos bassareus/bassaros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos komastes κωμαστής Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos laphystios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos mystes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos narthekophoros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos nyktipolos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos sabos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, dionysos thiasotes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos, gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
eschatology deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
euripides Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
gold leaves / gold tablets deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
hieronymus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
initiators deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
jiménez san cristóbal, a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
komos κῶμος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
manichaeism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 351
mysteries, mystery cults, bacchic, dionysiac Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
mystes μύστης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
omophagy deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
orpheus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
orphics deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
pinnoy, m. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
plato Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
plutarch' Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28, 351
reincarnation deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 351
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
rites deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28, 351
ritual taboo deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 351
sabazios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
saboi σάβοι Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
sabos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
stoicism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 351
telete deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
torch, torchlight Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
vegetarianism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28, 351
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
worshippers Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
zagreus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 48
zeus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 351