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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8490
Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 14-16
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16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 32.9 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

32.9. כִּי חֵלֶק יְהֹוָה עַמּוֹ יַעֲקֹב חֶבֶל נַחֲלָתוֹ׃ 32.9. For the portion of the LORD is His people, Jacob the lot of His inheritance."
2. Hebrew Bible, Amos, 4.13 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

4.13. כִּי הִנֵּה יוֹצֵר הָרִים וּבֹרֵא רוּחַ וּמַגִּיד לְאָדָם מַה־שֵּׂחוֹ עֹשֵׂה שַׁחַר עֵיפָה וְדֹרֵךְ עַל־בָּמֳתֵי אָרֶץ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי־צְבָאוֹת שְׁמוֹ׃ 4.13. For, lo, He that formeth the mountains, and createth the wind, And declareth unto man what is his thought, That maketh the morning darkness, And treadeth upon the high places of the earth; The LORD, the God of hosts, is His name."
3. Hesiod, Works And Days, 3, 668, 72-74, 2 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Come hither and of Zeus, your father, tell
4. Hesiod, Theogony, 160-182, 188-195, 201, 209-210, 403, 44, 478-479, 487, 489-493, 495, 497, 506, 71, 883, 886, 888-893, 904, 923, 937, 137 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

137. With Erebus and spawned Aether and Day;
5. Homer, Iliad, 4.59, 13.355, 14.201, 14.246, 14.302, 15.165-15.166 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.59. /For even though I grudge thee, and am fain to thwart their overthrow, I avail naught by my grudging, for truly thou art far the mightier. Still it beseemeth that my labour too be not made of none effect; for I also am a god, and my birth is from the stock whence is thine own, and crooked-counselling Cronos begat me as the most honoured of his daughters 13.355. /but Zeus was the elder born and the wiser. Therefore it was that Poseidon avoided to give open aid, but secretly sought ever to rouse the Argives throughout the host, in the likeness of a man. So these twain knotted the ends of the cords of mighty strife and evil war, and drew them taut over both armies 14.201. /For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.246. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.302. /Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife 15.165. /for I avow me to be better far than he in might, and the elder born. Yet his heart counteth it but a little thing to declare himself the peer of me of whom even the other gods are adread. So spake he, and wind-footed, swift Iris failed not to hearken, but went down from the hills of Ida to sacred Ilios. 15.166. /for I avow me to be better far than he in might, and the elder born. Yet his heart counteth it but a little thing to declare himself the peer of me of whom even the other gods are adread. So spake he, and wind-footed, swift Iris failed not to hearken, but went down from the hills of Ida to sacred Ilios.
6. Homer, Odyssey, 11.272 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

7. Herodotus, Histories, 4.5, 8.137 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.5. The Scythians say that their nation is the youngest in the world, and that it came into being in this way. A man whose name was Targitaüs appeared in this country, which was then desolate. They say that his parents were Zeus and a daughter of the Borysthenes river (I do not believe the story, but it is told). ,Such was Targitaüs' lineage; and he had three sons: Lipoxaïs, Arpoxaïs, and Colaxaïs, youngest of the three. ,In the time of their rule (the story goes) certain implements—namely, a plough, a yoke, a sword, and a flask, all of gold—fell down from the sky into Scythia . The eldest of them, seeing these, approached them meaning to take them; but the gold began to burn as he neared, and he stopped. ,Then the second approached, and the gold did as before. When these two had been driven back by the burning gold, the youngest brother approached and the burning stopped, and he took the gold to his own house. In view of this, the elder brothers agreed to give all the royal power to the youngest. 8.137. This Alexander was seventh in descent from Perdiccas, who got for himself the tyranny of Macedonia in the way that I will show. Three brothers of the lineage of Temenus came as banished men from Argos to Illyria, Gauanes and Aeropus and Perdiccas; and from Illyria they crossed over into the highlands of Macedonia till they came to the town Lebaea. ,There they served for wages as thetes in the king's household, one tending horses and another oxen. Perdiccas, who was the youngest, tended the lesser flocks. Now the king's wife cooked their food for them, for in old times the ruling houses among men, and not the common people alone, were lacking in wealth. ,Whenever she baked bread, the loaf of the thete Perdiccas grew double in size. Seeing that this kept happening, she told her husband, and it seemed to him when be heard it that this was a portent signifying some great matter. So he sent for his thetes and bade them depart from his territory. ,They said it was only just that they should have their wages before they departed. When they spoke of wages, the king was moved to foolishness and said, “That is the wage you merit, and it is that I give you,” pointing to the sunlight that shone down the smoke vent into the house. ,Gauanes and Aeropus, who were the elder, stood astonished when they heard that, but the boy said, “We accept what you give, O king,” and with that he took a knife which he had with him and drew a line with it on the floor of the house round the sunlight. When he had done this, he three times gathered up the sunlight into the fold of his garment and went his way with his companions.
8. New Testament, 1 Peter, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.2. as newborn babes, long for the pure milk of the Word, that you may grow thereby
9. New Testament, Acts, 5.30, 13.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.30. The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom you killed, hanging him on a tree. 13.29. When they had fulfilled all things that were written about him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a tomb.
10. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 1.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 4.8.4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

13. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.15, 4.17, 4.48, 4.51, 5.38, 5.57 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.15. How much more impartial than Celsus is Numenius the Pythagorean, who has given many proofs of being a very eloquent man, and who has carefully tested many opinions, and collected together from many sources what had the appearance of truth; for, in the first book of his treatise On the Good, speaking of those nations who have adopted the opinion that God is incorporeal, he enumerates the Jews also among those who hold this view; not showing any reluctance to use even the language of their prophets in his treatise, and to give it a metaphorical signification. It is said, moreover, that Hermippus has recorded in his first book, On Lawgivers, that it was from the Jewish people that Pythagoras derived the philosophy which he introduced among the Greeks. And there is extant a work by the historian Hecat us, treating of the Jews, in which so high a character is bestowed upon that nation for its learning, that Herennius Philo, in his treatise on the Jews, has doubts in the first place, whether it is really the composition of the historian; and says, in the second place, that if really his, it is probable that he was carried away by the plausible nature of the Jewish history, and so yielded his assent to their system. 4.17. But will not those narratives, especially when they are understood in their proper sense, appear far more worthy of respect than the story that Dionysus was deceived by the Titans, and expelled from the throne of Jupiter, and torn in pieces by them, and his remains being afterwards put together again, he returned as it were once more to life, and ascended to heaven? Or are the Greeks at liberty to refer such stories to the doctrine of the soul, and to interpret them figuratively, while the door of a consistent explanation, and one everywhere in accord and harmony with the writings of the Divine Spirit, who had His abode in pure souls, is closed against us? Celsus, then, is altogether ignorant of the purpose of our writings, and it is therefore upon his own acceptation of them that he casts discredit, and not upon their real meaning; whereas, if he had reflected on what is appropriate to a soul which is to enjoy an everlasting life, and on the opinion which we are to form of its essence and principles, he would not so have ridiculed the entrance of the immortal into a mortal body, which took place not according to the metempsychosis of Plato, but agreeably to another and higher view of things. And he would have observed one descent, distinguished by its great benevolence, undertaken to convert (as the Scripture mystically terms them) the lost sheep of the house of Israel, which had strayed down from the mountains, and to which the Shepherd is said in certain parables to have gone down, leaving on the mountains those which had not strayed. 4.48. In the next place, as if he had devoted himself solely to the manifestation of his hatred and dislike of the Jewish and Christian doctrine, he says: The more modest of Jewish and Christian writers give all these things an allegorical meaning; and, Because they are ashamed of these things, they take refuge in allegory. Now one might say to him, that if we must admit fables and fictions, whether written with a concealed meaning or with any other object, to be shameful narratives when taken in their literal acceptation, of what histories can this be said more truly than of the Grecian? In these histories, gods who are sons castrate the gods who are their fathers, and gods who are parents devour their own children, and a goddess-mother gives to the father of gods and men a stone to swallow instead of his own son, and a father has intercourse with his daughter, and a wife binds her own husband, having as her allies in the work the brother of the fettered god and his own daughter! But why should I enumerate these absurd stories of the Greeks regarding their gods, which are most shameful in themselves, even though invested with an allegorical meaning? (Take the instance) where Chrysippus of Soli, who is considered to be an ornament of the Stoic sect, on account of his numerous and learned treatises, explains a picture at Samos, in which Juno was represented as committing unspeakable abominations with Jupiter. This reverend philosopher says in his treatises, that matter receives the spermatic words of the god, and retains them within herself, in order to ornament the universe. For in the picture at Samos Juno represents matter, and Jupiter god. Now it is on account of these, and of countless other similar fables, that we would not even in word call the God of all things Jupiter, or the sun Apollo, or the moon Diana. But we offer to the Creator a worship which is pure, and speak with religious respect of His noble works of creation, not contaminating even in word the things of God; approving of the language of Plato in the Philebus, who would not admit that pleasure was a goddess, so great is my reverence, Protarchus, he says, for the very names of the gods. We verily entertain such reverence for the name of God, and for His noble works of creation, that we would not, even under pretext of an allegorical meaning, admit any fable which might do injury to the young. 4.51. Celsus appears to me to have heard that there are treatises in existence which contain allegorical explanations of the law of Moses. These however, he could not have read; for if he had he would not have said: The allegorical explanations, however, which have been devised are much more shameful and absurd than the fables themselves, inasmuch as they endeavour to unite with marvellous and altogether insensate folly things which cannot at all be made to harmonize. He seems to refer in these words to the works of Philo, or to those of still older writers, such as Aristobulus. But I conjecture that Celsus has not read their books, since it appears to me that in many passages they have so successfully hit the meaning (of the sacred writers), that even Grecian philosophers would have been captivated by their explanations; for in their writings we find not only a polished style, but exquisite thoughts and doctrines, and a rational use of what Celsus imagines to be fables in the sacred writings. I know, moreover, that Numenius the Pythagorean- a surpassingly excellent expounder of Plato, and who held a foremost place as a teacher of the doctrines of Pythagoras - in many of his works quotes from the writings of Moses and the prophets, and applies to the passages in question a not improbable allegorical meaning, as in his work called Epops, and in those which treat of Numbers and of Place. And in the third book of his dissertation on The Good, he quotes also a narrative regarding Jesus - without, however, mentioning His name - and gives it an allegorical signification, whether successfully or the reverse I may state on another occasion. He relates also the account respecting Moses, and Jannes, and Jambres. But we are not elated on account of this instance, though we express our approval of Numenius, rather than of Celsus and other Greeks, because he was willing to investigate our histories from a desire to acquire knowledge, and was (duly) affected by them as narratives which were to be allegorically understood, and which did not belong to the category of foolish compositions. 5.38. I wish, however, to show how Celsus asserts without any good reason, that each one reveres his domestic and native institutions. For he declares that those Ethiopians who inhabit Meroe know only of two gods, Jupiter and Bacchus, and worship these alone; and that the Arabians also know only of two, viz., Bacchus, who is also an Ethiopian deity, and Urania, whose worship is confined to them. According to his account, neither do the Ethiopians worship Urania, nor the Arabians Jupiter. If, then, an Ethiopian were from any accident to fall into the hands of the Arabians, and were to be judged guilty of impiety because he did not worship Urania, and for this reason should incur the danger of death, would it be proper for the Ethiopian to die, or to act contrary to his country's laws, and do obeisance to Urania? Now, if it would be proper for him to act contrary to the laws of his country, he will do what is not right, so far as the language of Celsus is any standard; while, if he should be led away to death, let him show the reasonableness of selecting such a fate. I know not whether, if the Ethiopian doctrine taught men to philosophize on the immortality of the soul, and the honour which is paid to religion, they would reverence those as deities who are deemed to be such by the laws of the country. A similar illustration may be employed in the case of the Arabians, if from any accident they happened to visit the Ethiopians about Meroe. For, having been taught to worship Urania and Bacchus alone, they will not worship Jupiter along with the Ethiopians; and if, adjudged guilty of impiety, they should be led away to death, let Celsus tell us what it would be reasonable on their part to do. And with regard to the fables which relate to Osiris and Isis, it is superfluous and out of place at present to enumerate them. For although an allegorical meaning may be given to the fables, they will nevertheless teach us to offer divine worship to cold water, and to the earth, which is subject to men, and all the animal creation. For in this way, I presume, they refer Osiris to water, and Isis to earth; while with regard to Serapis the accounts are numerous and conflicting, to the effect that very recently he appeared in public, agreeably to certain juggling tricks performed at the desire of Ptolemy, who wished to show to the people of Alexandria as it were a visible god. And we have read in the writings of Numenius the Pythagorean regarding his formation, that he partakes of the essence of all the animals and plants that are under the control of nature, that he may appear to have been fashioned into a god, not by the makers of images alone, with the aid of profane mysteries, and juggling tricks employed to invoke demons, but also by magicians and sorcerers, and those demons who are bewitched by their incantations. 5.57. Now, that miraculous appearances have sometimes been witnessed by human beings, is related by the Greeks; and not only by those of them who might be suspected of composing fabulous narratives, but also by those who have given every evidence of being genuine philosophers, and of having related with perfect truth what had happened to them. Accounts of this kind we have read in the writings of Chrysippus of Soli, and also some things of the same kind relating to Pythagoras; as well as in some of the more recent writers who lived a very short time ago, as in the treatise of Plutarch of Ch ronea on the Soul, and in the second book of the work of Numenius the Pythagorean on the Incorruptibility of the Soul. Now, when such accounts are related by the Greeks, and especially by the philosophers among them, they are not to be received with mockery and ridicule, nor to be regarded as fictions and fables; but when those who are devoted to the God of all things, and who endure all kinds of injury, even to death itself, rather than allow a falsehood to escape their lips regarding God, announce the appearances of angels which they have themselves witnessed, they are to be deemed unworthy of belief, and their words are not to be regarded as true! Now it is opposed to sound reason to judge in this way whether individuals are speaking truth or falsehood. For those who act honestly, only after a long and careful examination into the details of a subject, slowly and cautiously express their opinion of the veracity or falsehood of this or that person with regard to the marvels which they may relate; since it is the case that neither do all men show themselves worthy of belief, nor do all make it distinctly evident that they are relating to men only fictions and fables. Moreover, regarding the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, we have this remark to make, that it is not at all wonderful if, on such an occasion, either one or two angels should have appeared to announce that Jesus had risen from the dead, and to provide for the safety of those who believed in such an event to the advantage of their souls. Nor does it appear to me at all unreasonable, that those who believe in the resurrection of Jesus, and who manifest, as a fruit of their faith not to be lightly esteemed, their possession of a virtuous life, and their withdrawal from the flood of evils, should not be unattended by angels who lend their help in accomplishing their conversion to God.
14. Orphic Hymns., Argonautica, 15-16, 14

15. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 12, 139-141, 149, 15-18, 20-22, 240, 243, 31, 8, 10

16. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 13.4, 15.6, 16.3-16.6, 16.14, 17.1-17.6, 17.12, 18.9-18.10, 21.5, 21.7



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
air Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
aither Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66
allegory deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 231
anaxagoras Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
anaximenes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
aphrodite Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
aphrodite urania Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
aphrodites birth by the ejaculation of zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
aphrodites births Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
as phallus (that of uranus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66
athena Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58, 63
catabasis deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22
celsus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 282
conversion deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 175
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56
cosmos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 56, 57, 58, 63, 119
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 231
demiurge Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66, 119
derveni papyrus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22, 175, 187, 192, 231
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 57, 63, 66
derveni poet Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 56, 57
destiny, of the world Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66, 119
diogenes of apollonia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
dionysus, heart de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36
dionysus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22, 231
earth, gaia, ge de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
egg, cosmic Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
egypt/egyptian de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 35
egypt deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192, 282
eleusinian, orpheus, orphic, samothracian, isis de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 35
empedocles deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 187, 231
erinyes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
eros Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36
eschatology deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22, 187
etymologies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 278
etymology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
eudemian theogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
euhemerism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 231, 278
eumenides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 57
gaia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 57, 58
gnostic/ gnosticism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192, 282
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 57, 58, 63
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 57, 58, 63, 66, 119
gods as elements, names of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
gods as elements, olympian gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 58
gold leaves / gold tablets deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22
hades (god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
harmonia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
hera Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
heraclitus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 231, 282
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 56, 57, 58, 63
hestia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 57, 58
hieronymus and hellanicus, (theogony) deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 175
homer Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 63
homeric poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 57
hymn to zeus (orphic) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 57, 66, 119
identified with zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
irenaeus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
isis de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 35
kingship, divine Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 57, 63, 119
metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 56, 63; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36
moira Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66, 119
monotheism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192, 231
moon de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36
moses deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 231, 282
neoplatonism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
night de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36
night (goddess) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66, 119
ocean de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 36
oceanus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 58
oracles (chaldean) deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192
oracles (sibylline) deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 63
orphic, orphism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
orphic, see bacchic, initiation, mystery cults, rites de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 35
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 35, 36
orphic de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 35
orphic myths Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
orphic theogonies Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66
orphics deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22
peitho (persuasion) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
persephone Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 63
phanes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66; Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
phanes / protogonos deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 175, 192
plagiarism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192, 282
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22, 175, 187, 231, 278, 282
platonizing sethians Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
poseidon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 57, 58
protogonos Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 56, 57, 58, 63, 66
protophanes Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
punishments Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 231, 282
rhapsodies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 175, 187
rhapsodies (orphic poem) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 57
rivers (in theogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66
sethians' Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 64
sibyl deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192
sky Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
springs (in theogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66
stoicism Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 187, 192
stoics Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
sun deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 175, 231
swallowing, cronus swallowing of his children Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 57, 63
swallowing, zeus swallowing of metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 63
swallowing, zeus swallowing of protogonos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 57, 63
swallowing, zeus swallowing of the phallus of uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66, 119
syncretism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 192, 278
telete deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 278
tethys Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
theogonies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22, 175
theology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 63
time (in cosmogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66, 119
titans Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56
typhon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56
underworld Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
uranus, euphronides (son of euphrone = night) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 56, 57, 58, 119
uranus castration, as first-born (πρωτόγονος) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 66
uranus castration Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53
uranus phallus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58, 119
wisdom (expertise), in theogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 119
zeus, as ἀήρ and νοῦς Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 56, 57, 58, 63, 66, 119; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 22, 175, 187, 192, 231, 278, 282
zeus alone (μοῦνος) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 63, 66
zeus as king Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 56, 57, 63, 119
zeus new creation of the world Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 58, 63
zeus pregnancy Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
αἰδοῖον, as venerable (epithet of protogonos) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 53, 63
θόρνηι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
νοῦς (allegory of zeus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
νῦν ἐόντα, τὰ (the things-that-are-now) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
πνεῦμα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
φρόνησις Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
ἀήρ Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119
ἐόντα, τὰ (the things-that-are) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 119