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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8369
Olympiodorus The Younger Of Alexandria, In Platonis Phaedonem Commentaria, 1.8
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 3.60 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.60. Sed cum ab his omnia proficiscantur officia, non sine causa dicitur ad ea referri omnes nostras cogitationes, in his et excessum e vita et in vita mansionem. in quo enim plura sunt quae secundum naturam sunt, huius officium est in vita manere; in quo autem aut sunt plura contraria aut fore videntur, huius officium est de vita excedere. ex quo ex quo RV e quo (equo) apparet et sapientis esse aliquando officium excedere e vita, cum beatus sit, et stulti manere in vita, cum sit miser. 3.60.  But since these neutral things form the basis of all appropriate acts, there is good ground for the dictum that it is with these things that all our practical deliberations deal, including the will to live and the will to quit this life. When a man's circumstances contain a preponderance of things in accordance with nature, it is appropriate for him to remain alive; when he possesses or sees in prospect a majority of the contrary things, it is appropriate for him to depart from life. This makes it plain that it is on occasion appropriate for the Wise Man to quit life although he is happy, and also of the Foolish Man to remain in life although he is miserable.
2. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.130 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.130. Their definition of love is an effort toward friendliness due to visible beauty appearing, its sole end being friendship, not bodily enjoyment. At all events, they allege that Thrasonides, although he had his mistress in his power, abstained from her because she hated him. By which it is shown, they think, that love depends upon regard, as Chrysippus says in his treatise of Love, and is not sent by the gods. And beauty they describe as the bloom or flower of virtue.of the three kinds of life, the contemplative, the practical, and the rational, they declare that we ought to choose the last, for that a rational being is expressly produced by nature for contemplation and for action. They tell us that the wise man will for reasonable cause make his own exit from life, on his country's behalf or for the sake of his friends, or if he suffer intolerable pain, mutilation, or incurable disease.
3. Plotinus, Enneads, 1.9 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Phaedonem Commentaria, 1.13 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
body Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
cato Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
cicero Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
commentary (on the phaedo) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
curriculum Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
damascius Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
etymology Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
god Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
good Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
gorgias Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
hellenic/hellenism Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
hera Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
intellect (also intelligence) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
life (in the general philosophical sense), types of Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
logos/λόγος Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
love and friendship Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
menoeceus Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
myth/mythology/μῦýθοι Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
neoplatonic/neoplatonism/neoplatonist Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
olympiodorus Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280; Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
pagan/paganism Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
phaenomena/φαινόμενα Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
plato, phaedo Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 92
platonism, neoplatonism Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
politics, political and social obligations Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
proclus Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
purification (katharsis) Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
suicide, and cicero Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
suicide, in stoicism Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
suicide, in tragedy Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 199
suicide Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280
virtue' Delcomminette, d’Hoine, and Gavray, Ancient Readings of Plato’s Phaedo (2015) 280