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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8341
Numenius Of Apamea, Fragments, 25
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Numenius Heracleensis, Fragments, 25 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Academica, 2.77-2.78 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 2.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 5.2, 7.174, 7.177, 7.179, 9.5 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.2. He seceded from the Academy while Plato was still alive. Hence the remark attributed to the latter: Aristotle spurns me, as colts kick out at the mother who bore them. Hermippus in his Lives mentions that he was absent as Athenian envoy at the court of Philip when Xenocrates became head of the Academy, and that on his return, when he saw the school under a new head, he made choice of a public walk in the Lyceum where he would walk up and down discussing philosophy with his pupils until it was time to rub themselves with oil. Hence the name Peripatetic. But others say that it was given to him because, when Alexander was recovering from an illness and taking daily walks, Aristotle joined him and talked with him on certain matters. 7.174. To the solitary man who talked to himself he remarked, You are not talking to a bad man. When some one twitted him on his old age, his reply was, I too am ready to depart; but when again I consider that I am in all points in good health and that I can still write and read, I am content to wait. We are told that he wrote down Zeno's lectures on oyster-shells and the blade-bones of oxen through lack of money to buy paper. Such was he; and yet, although Zeno had many other eminent disciples, he was able to succeed him in the headship of the school.He has left some very fine writings, which are as follows:of Time.of Zeno's Natural Philosophy, two books.Interpretations of Heraclitus, four books.De Sensu.of Art.A Reply to Democritus.A Reply to Aristarchus.A Reply to Herillus.of Impulse, two books. 7.177. 6. SPHAERUSAmongst those who after the death of Zeno became pupils of Cleanthes was Sphaerus of Bosporus, as already mentioned. After making considerable progress in his studies, he went to Alexandria to the court of King Ptolemy Philopator. One day when a discussion had arisen on the question whether the wise man could stoop to hold opinion, and Sphaerus had maintained that this was impossible, the king, wishing to refute him, ordered some waxen pomegranates to be put on the table. Sphaerus was taken in and the king cried out, You have given your assent to a presentation which is false. But Sphaerus was ready with a neat answer. I assented not to the proposition that they are pomegranates, but to another, that there are good grounds for thinking them to be pomegranates. Certainty of presentation and reasonable probability are two totally different things. Mnesistratus having accused him of denying that Ptolemy was a king, his reply was, Being of such quality as he is, Ptolemy is indeed a king. 7.179. 7. CHRYSIPPUSChrysippus, the son of Apollonius, came either from Soli or from Tarsus, as Alexander relates in his Successions. He was a pupil of Cleanthes. Before this he used to practise as a long-distance runner; but afterwards he came to hear Zeno, or, as Diocles and most people say, Cleanthes; and then, while Cleanthes was still living, withdrew from his school and attained exceptional eminence as a philosopher. He had good natural parts and showed the greatest acuteness in every branch of the subject; so much so that he differed on most points from Zeno, and from Cleanthes as well, to whom he often used to say that all he wanted was to be told what the doctrines were; he would find out the proofs for himself. Nevertheless, whenever he had contended against Cleanthes, he would afterwards feel remorse, so that he constantly came out with the lines:Blest in all else am I, save only whereI touch Cleanthes: there I am ill-fortuned. 9.5. He was exceptional from his boyhood; for when a youth he used to say that he knew nothing, although when he was grown up he claimed that he knew everything. He was nobody's pupil, but he declared that he inquired of himself, and learned everything from himself. Some, however, had said that he had been a pupil of Xenophanes, as we learn from Sotion, who also tells us that Ariston in his book On Heraclitus declares that he was cured of the dropsy and died of another disease. And Hippobotus has the same story.As to the work which passes as his, it is a continuous treatise On Nature, but is divided into three discourses, one on the universe, another on politics, and a third on theology.
6. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 14.5.12 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

7. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.12 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.12. In the next place, since he reproaches us with the existence of heresies in Christianity as being a ground of accusation against it, saying that when Christians had greatly increased in numbers, they were divided and split up into factions, each individual desiring to have his own party; and further, that being thus separated through their numbers, they confute one another, still having, so to speak, one name in common, if indeed they still retain it. And this is the only thing which they are yet ashamed to abandon, while other matters are determined in different ways by the various sects. In reply to which, we say that heresies of different kinds have never originated from any matter in which the principle involved was not important and beneficial to human life. For since the science of medicine is useful and necessary to the human race, and many are the points of dispute in it respecting the manner of curing bodies, there are found, for this reason, numerous heresies confessedly prevailing in the science of medicine among the Greeks, and also, I suppose, among those barbarous nations who profess to employ medicine. And, again, since philosophy makes a profession of the truth, and promises a knowledge of existing things with a view to the regulation of life, and endeavours to teach what is advantageous to our race, and since the investigation of these matters is attended with great differences of opinion, innumerable heresies have consequently sprung up in philosophy, some of which are more celebrated than others. Even Judaism itself afforded a pretext for the origination of heresies, in the different acceptation accorded to the writings of Moses and those of the prophets. So, then, seeing Christianity appeared an object of veneration to men, not to the more servile class alone, as Celsus supposes, but to many among the Greeks who were devoted to literary pursuits, there necessarily originated heresies - not at all, however, as the result of faction and strife, but through the earnest desire of many literary men to become acquainted with the doctrines of Christianity. The consequence of which was, that, taking in different acceptations those discourses which were believed by all to be divine, there arose heresies, which received their names from those individuals who admired, indeed, the origin of Christianity, but who were led, in some way or other, by certain plausible reasons, to discordant views. And yet no one would act rationally in avoiding medicine because of its heresies; nor would he who aimed at that which is seemly entertain a hatred of philosophy, and adduce its many heresies as a pretext for his antipathy. And so neither are the sacred books of Moses and the prophets to be condemned on account of the heresies in Judaism.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academics, the academy Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
academy, sceptical Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
academy, the (of plato) Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
arcesilaus Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
aristo of chios Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
aristotle, dissension with plato Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
cicero Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
cleanthes Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
dogmatics, heraclitus as a dogmatic philosopher Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
epoche Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
heraclitus Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
heresy, rabbinic judaism, influence of historiographical outlook of the philosophical schools Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
heresy, rabbinic judaism Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
katalepsis, kataleptic impression Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
marcus aurelius Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
mentor Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
montanism Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
numenius Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
paul Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
philosophical schools, as influencing rabbinic treatment of heresy' Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
physics Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
platonic dialogues, theaetetus Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
presocratics Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
prophecy Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
revelation Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
scepticism, academic Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
socrates (platonic character) Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
soul Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
sphaerus Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
spirit Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
stoics Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
syntagma by justin Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
system Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68
tranquillity, truth Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
zeno of citium, epistemology of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
zeno of citium Erler et al., Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition (2021) 68