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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8341
Numenius Of Apamea, Fragments, 20-22
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

508b. Why, no. But it is, I think, the most sunlike of all the instruments of sense. By far the most. And does it not receive the power which it possesses as an influx, as it were, dispensed from the sun? Certainly. Is it not also true that the sun is not vision, yet as being the cause thereof is beheld by vision itself? That is so, he said. This, then, you must understand that I meant by the offspring of the good which the good
2. Plato, Sophist, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Aristotle, Soul, 3.5 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Aristotle, Generation of Animals, 2.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 127 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

127. And for what reason is it built, except to serve as a shelter and protection? This is the object. Now passing on from these particular buildings, consider the greatest house or city, namely, this world, for you will find that God is the cause of it, by whom it was made. That the materials are the four elements, of which it is composed; that the instrument is the word of God, by means of which it was made; and the object of the building you will find to be the display of the goodness of the Creator. This is the discriminating opinion of men fond of truth, who desire to attain to true and sound knowledge; but they who say that they have gotten anything by means of God, conceive that the cause is the instrument, the Creator namely, and the instrument the cause, namely, the human mind. 127. And if their connections and families are very numerous, then by reason of their intermarriages and the mutual connections formed with different houses the iniquity and injury will proceed and infect the whole city all around.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 25 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

25. But think not that thus this taking away, could be by means of cutting off or separation; but it is here, as is the case in an operation effected by fire, which can light ten thousand torches, without itself being diminished the least atom, or ceasing to remain as it was before. Something like this also is the nature of knowledge. For though it has made all its pupils, and all who have become acquainted with it, learned, still it is in no degree diminished itself, but very often it even becomes improved, just as, they say, that fountains sometimes are by being drained dry; for, it is said, that they sometimes become sweeter by such a process.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. And the power and faculty which could be capable of creating the world, has for its origin that good which is founded on truth; for if any one were desirous to investigate the cause on account of which this universe was created, I think that he would come to no erroneous conclusion if he were to say as one of the ancients did say: "That the Father and Creator was good; on which account he did not grudge the substance a share of his own excellent nature, since it had nothing good of itself, but was able to become everything.
9. New Testament, Matthew, 19.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19.17. He said to him, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but one, that is, God. But if you want to enter into life, keep the commandments.
10. Plutarch, Platonic Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 65.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Tacitus, Histories, 5.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.5.  Whatever their origin, these rites are maintained by their antiquity: the other customs of the Jews are base and abominable, and owe their persistence to their depravity. For the worst rascals among other peoples, renouncing their ancestral religions, always kept sending tribute and contributions to Jerusalem, thereby increasing the wealth of the Jews; again, the Jews are extremely loyal toward one another, and always ready to show compassion, but toward every other people they feel only hate and enmity. They sit apart at meals, and they sleep apart, and although as a race, they are prone to lust, they abstain from intercourse with foreign women; yet among themselves nothing is unlawful. They adopted circumcision to distinguish themselves from other peoples by this difference. Those who are converted to their ways follow the same practice, and the earliest lesson they receive is to despise the gods, to disown their country, and to regard their parents, children, and brothers as of little account. However, they take thought to increase their numbers; for they regard it as a crime to kill any late-born child, and they believe that the souls of those who are killed in battle or by the executioner are immortal: hence comes their passion for begetting children, and their scorn of death. They bury the body rather than burn it, thus following the Egyptians' custom; they likewise bestow the same care on the dead, and hold the same belief about the world below; but their ideas of heavenly things are quite the opposite. The Egyptians worship many animals and monstrous images; the Jews conceive of one god only, and that with the mind alone: they regard as impious those who make from perishable materials representations of gods in man's image; that supreme and eternal being is to them incapable of representation and without end. Therefore they set up no statues in their cities, still less in their temples; this flattery is not paid their kings, nor this honour given to the Caesars. But since their priests used to chant to the accompaniment of pipes and cymbals and to wear garlands of ivy, and because a golden vine was found in their temple, some have thought that they were devotees of Father Liber, the conqueror of the East, in spite of the incongruity of their customs. For Liber established festive rites of a joyous nature, while the ways of the Jews are preposterous and mean.
13. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 24.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 2.1.16.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 6.6, 15.8, 16.10-16.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 6.6, 15.8, 16.10-16.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Nag Hammadi, The Gospel of Truth, 18.38 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Nag Hammadi, The Tripartite Tractate, 70.26 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

19. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.80 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.80. Seeing, however, that Celsus alleges that Christians are won over by us through vain hopes, we thus reply to him when he finds fault with our doctrine of the blessed life, and of communion with God: As for you, good sir, they also are won over by vain hopes who have accepted the doctrine of Pythagoras and Plato regarding the soul, that it is its nature to ascend to the vault of heaven, and in the super-celestial space to behold the sights which are seen by the blessed spectators above. According to you, O Celsus, they also who have accepted the doctrine of the duration of the soul (after death), and who lead a life through which they become heroes, and make their abodes with the gods, are won over by vain hopes. Probably also they who are persuaded that the soul comes (into the body) from without, and that it will be withdrawn from the power of death, would be said by Celsus to be won over by empty hopes. Let him then come forth to the contest, no longer concealing the sect to which he belongs, but confessing himself to be an Epicurean, and let him meet the arguments, which are not lightly advanced among Greeks and Barbarians, regarding the immortality of the soul, or its duration (after death), or the immortality of the thinking principle; and let him prove that these are words which deceive with empty hopes those who give their assent to them; but that the adherents of his philosophical system are pure from empty hopes, and that they indeed lead to hopes of good, or - what is more in keeping with his opinions - give birth to no hope at all, on account of the immediate and complete destruction of the soul (after death). Unless, perhaps, Celsus and the Epicureans will deny that it is a vain hope which they entertain regarding their end - pleasure - which, according to them, is the supreme good, and which consists in the permanent health of the body, and the hope regarding it which is entertained by Epicurus.
20. Origen, On First Principles, 2.11.6 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.11.6. We are therefore to suppose that the saints will remain there until they recognise the twofold mode of government in those things which are performed in the air. And when I say twofold mode, I mean this: When we were upon earth, we saw either animals or trees, and beheld the differences among them, and also the very great diversity among men; but although we saw these things, we did not understand the reason of them; and this only was suggested to us from the visible diversity, that we should examine and inquire upon what principle these things were either created or diversely arranged. And a zeal or desire for knowledge of this kind being conceived by us on earth, the full understanding and comprehension of it will be granted after death, if indeed the result should follow according to our expectations. When, therefore, we shall have fully comprehended its nature, we shall understand in a twofold manner what we saw on earth. Some such view, then, must we hold regarding this abode in the air. I think, therefore, that all the saints who depart from this life will remain in some place situated on the earth, which holy Scripture calls paradise, as in some place of instruction, and, so to speak, class-room or school of souls, in which they are to be instructed regarding all the things which they had seen on earth, and are to receive also some information respecting things that are to follow in the future, as even when in this life they had obtained in some degree indications of future events, although through a glass darkly, all of which are revealed more clearly and distinctly to the saints in their proper time and place. If any one indeed be pure in heart, and holy in mind, and more practised in perception, he will, by making more rapid progress, quickly ascend to a place in the air, and reach the kingdom of heaven, through those mansions, so to speak, in the various places which the Greeks have termed spheres, i.e., globes, but which holy Scripture has called heavens; in each of which he will first see clearly what is done there, and in the second place, will discover the reason why things are so done: and thus he will in order pass through all gradations, following Him who has passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, who said, I will that where I am, these may be also. And of this diversity of places He speaks, when He says, In My Father's house are many mansions. He Himself is everywhere, and passes swiftly through all things; nor are we any longer to understand Him as existing in those narrow limits in which He was once confined for our sakes, i.e., not in that circumscribed body which He occupied on earth, when dwelling among men, according to which He might be considered as enclosed in some one place.
21. Plotinus, Enneads, 2.9, 5.5, 6.9 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

22. Porphyry, Life of Plotinus, 17 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

23. Proclus, In Platonis Timaeum Commentarii, 1.306.1-1.306.14, 2.95 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

24. Proclus, In Platonis Timaeum Commentarii, 1.306.1-1.306.14, 2.95 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeons, of barbelo Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
aeons Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
amelius Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373; Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 50
antiochus of ascalon Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
antithesis Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 328
aristotle Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187; Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 69
ascent literature, visionary/mystical Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
atticus Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 50
autogenes Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
clement of alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391; Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
contemplation Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
demiurge Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
dualism, dualist Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
dyad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
ethics Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
eusebius Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
evil Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391; Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 356
father Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
form/forms/ideas Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
gnosis Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 356
gnostic, gnosticism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373
god Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391; Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
goddess, second god Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
good, the Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
good Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
intellect, triad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
intellect Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
late antiquity/later antiquity Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
life, noetic Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
life, the living being of timaeus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
matter, sensible Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
matter (hyle) Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 328
metaphor, body' Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 356
middle platonism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373
mind, triad, nous Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
moderatus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
monad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
myth Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 328
noetic triad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
numenius Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391; Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187; Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 50, 69
origen Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
peripatetics Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
plato, parmenides Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
plato, republic Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
plato, timaeus Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
plato Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
platonist Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
platonizing sethians Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
plotinus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391; Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 50
plutarch Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 50, 69
porphyry Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373; Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187; Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 50
proclus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373; Vazques and Ross, Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition (2022) 69
sethians Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 391
stoic, stoicism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 373, 391
stranger Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 328
theology, metaphysics Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 187
unknown, god Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 328