Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8340
Numenius Heracleensis, Fragments, 25
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, Academica, 1.35, 2.77-2.78 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.35. sed Zeno, cum Arcesilam Archesilaum p 1 w anteiret aetate valdeque subtiliter dissereret et peracute moveretur, corrigere conatus est disciplinam. eam quoque si videtur correctionem explicabo, sicut solebat Antiochus.” Mihi vero inquam videtur, quod vides idem significare Pomponium. VA. 'Zeno igitur nullo modo is erat qui ut Theophrastus nervos neruis p virtutis inciderit, incideret s Lb. -rent n sed contra qui omnia quae que om. s quaecumque Reid ad beatam vitam pertinerent in una virtute poneret nec quicquam aliud numeraret in bonis idque appellaret honestum quod esset simplex quoddam et solum et unum bonum.
2. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 2.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 4.33, 4.40, 5.2, 7.162, 7.179 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.33. Some represent him as emulous of Pyrrho as well. He was devoted to dialectic and adopted the methods of argument introduced by the Eretrian school. On account of this Ariston said of him:Plato the head of him, Pyrrho the tail, midway Diodorus.And Timon speaks of him thus:Having the lead of Menedemus at his heart, he will run either to that mass of flesh, Pyrrho, or to Diodorus.And a little farther on he introduces him as saying:I shall swim to Pyrrho and to crooked Diodorus.He was highly axiomatic and concise, and in his discourse fond of distinguishing the meaning of terms. He was satirical enough, and outspoken. 4.40. Once indeed, when at Athens, he stopped too long in the Piraeus, discussing themes, out of friendship for Hierocles, and for this he was censured by certain persons. He was very lavish, in short another Aristippus, and he was fond of dining well, but only with those who shared his tastes. He lived openly with Theodete and Phila, the Elean courtesans, and to those who censured him he quoted the maxims of Aristippus. He was also fond of boys and very susceptible. Hence he was accused by Ariston of Chios, the Stoic, and his followers, who called him a corrupter of youth and a shameless teacher of immorality. 5.2. He seceded from the Academy while Plato was still alive. Hence the remark attributed to the latter: Aristotle spurns me, as colts kick out at the mother who bore them. Hermippus in his Lives mentions that he was absent as Athenian envoy at the court of Philip when Xenocrates became head of the Academy, and that on his return, when he saw the school under a new head, he made choice of a public walk in the Lyceum where he would walk up and down discussing philosophy with his pupils until it was time to rub themselves with oil. Hence the name Peripatetic. But others say that it was given to him because, when Alexander was recovering from an illness and taking daily walks, Aristotle joined him and talked with him on certain matters. 7.162. After meeting Polemo, says Diocles of Magnesia, while Zeno was suffering from a protracted illness, he recanted his views. The Stoic doctrine to which he attached most importance was the wise man's refusal to hold mere opinions. And against this doctrine Persaeus was contending when he induced one of a pair of twins to deposit a certain sum with Ariston and afterwards got the other to reclaim it. Ariston being thus reduced to perplexity was refuted. He was at variance with Arcesilaus; and one day when he saw an abortion in the shape of a bull with a uterus, he said, Alas, here Arcesilaus has had given into his hand an argument against the evidence of the senses. 7.179. 7. CHRYSIPPUSChrysippus, the son of Apollonius, came either from Soli or from Tarsus, as Alexander relates in his Successions. He was a pupil of Cleanthes. Before this he used to practise as a long-distance runner; but afterwards he came to hear Zeno, or, as Diocles and most people say, Cleanthes; and then, while Cleanthes was still living, withdrew from his school and attained exceptional eminence as a philosopher. He had good natural parts and showed the greatest acuteness in every branch of the subject; so much so that he differed on most points from Zeno, and from Cleanthes as well, to whom he often used to say that all he wanted was to be told what the doctrines were; he would find out the proofs for himself. Nevertheless, whenever he had contended against Cleanthes, he would afterwards feel remorse, so that he constantly came out with the lines:Blest in all else am I, save only whereI touch Cleanthes: there I am ill-fortuned.
6. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 14.5.11, 14.6.9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

7. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.12 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.12. In the next place, since he reproaches us with the existence of heresies in Christianity as being a ground of accusation against it, saying that when Christians had greatly increased in numbers, they were divided and split up into factions, each individual desiring to have his own party; and further, that being thus separated through their numbers, they confute one another, still having, so to speak, one name in common, if indeed they still retain it. And this is the only thing which they are yet ashamed to abandon, while other matters are determined in different ways by the various sects. In reply to which, we say that heresies of different kinds have never originated from any matter in which the principle involved was not important and beneficial to human life. For since the science of medicine is useful and necessary to the human race, and many are the points of dispute in it respecting the manner of curing bodies, there are found, for this reason, numerous heresies confessedly prevailing in the science of medicine among the Greeks, and also, I suppose, among those barbarous nations who profess to employ medicine. And, again, since philosophy makes a profession of the truth, and promises a knowledge of existing things with a view to the regulation of life, and endeavours to teach what is advantageous to our race, and since the investigation of these matters is attended with great differences of opinion, innumerable heresies have consequently sprung up in philosophy, some of which are more celebrated than others. Even Judaism itself afforded a pretext for the origination of heresies, in the different acceptation accorded to the writings of Moses and those of the prophets. So, then, seeing Christianity appeared an object of veneration to men, not to the more servile class alone, as Celsus supposes, but to many among the Greeks who were devoted to literary pursuits, there necessarily originated heresies - not at all, however, as the result of faction and strife, but through the earnest desire of many literary men to become acquainted with the doctrines of Christianity. The consequence of which was, that, taking in different acceptations those discourses which were believed by all to be divine, there arose heresies, which received their names from those individuals who admired, indeed, the origin of Christianity, but who were led, in some way or other, by certain plausible reasons, to discordant views. And yet no one would act rationally in avoiding medicine because of its heresies; nor would he who aimed at that which is seemly entertain a hatred of philosophy, and adduce its many heresies as a pretext for his antipathy. And so neither are the sacred books of Moses and the prophets to be condemned on account of the heresies in Judaism.
8. Augustine, Contra Academicos, 2.13, 3.38 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

9. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.11-1.12



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academics, the academy Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
academy, the (of plato) Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
arcesilaus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
aristo of chios Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
aristotle, dissension with plato Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
augustine Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
biography, of zeno Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
cicero, academic scepticism Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
cicero Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
correctio Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
diogenes laertius Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
epoche Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
heresy, rabbinic judaism, influence of historiographical outlook of the philosophical schools Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
heresy, rabbinic judaism Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
katalepsis, kataleptic impression Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
mentor Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
montanism Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
numenius Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
paul Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
philo of larissa Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
philosophical schools, as influencing rabbinic treatment of heresy' Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 546
platonists Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
polemo Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
prophecy Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
revelation Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
scepticism, academic Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
sedley, david Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
spirit Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
stoics, origins of school Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
syntagma by justin Lieu, Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century (2015) 416
tranquillity, truth Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223
zeno of citium, biography Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
zeno of citium, epistemology of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 223