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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8258
New Testament, Matthew, 11.16-11.17


Τίνι δὲ ὁμοιώσω τὴν γενεὰν ταύτην; ὁμοία ἐστὶν παιδίοις καθημένοις ἐν ταῖς ἀγοραῖς ὓ προσφωνοῦντα τοῖς ἑτέροιςBut to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the marketplaces, who call to their companions


λέγουσιν Ηὐλήσαμεν ὑμῖν καὶ οὐκ ὠρχήσασθε· ἐθρηνήσαμεν καὶ οὐκ ἐκόψασθε·and say, 'We played the flute for you, and you didn't dance. We mourned for you, and you didn't lament.'


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 21.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

21.20. and they shall say unto the elders of his city: ‘This our son is stubborn and rebellious, he doth not hearken to our voice; he is a glutton, and a drunkard.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 1.15-1.19, 8.22, 8.36, 9.12 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.15. בְּנִי אַל־תֵּלֵךְ בְּדֶרֶךְ אִתָּם מְנַע רַגְלְךָ מִנְּתִיבָתָם׃ 1.16. כִּי רַגְלֵיהֶם לָרַע יָרוּצוּ וִימַהֲרוּ לִשְׁפָּךְ־דָּם׃ 1.17. כִּי־חִנָּם מְזֹרָה הָרָשֶׁת בְּעֵינֵי כָל־בַּעַל כָּנָף׃ 1.18. וְהֵם לְדָמָם יֶאֱרֹבוּ יִצְפְּנוּ לְנַפְשֹׁתָם׃ 1.19. כֵּן אָרְחוֹת כָּל־בֹּצֵעַ בָּצַע אֶת־נֶפֶשׁ בְּעָלָיו יִקָּח׃ 8.22. יְהוָה קָנָנִי רֵאשִׁית דַּרְכּוֹ קֶדֶם מִפְעָלָיו מֵאָז׃ 8.36. וְחֹטְאִי חֹמֵס נַפְשׁוֹ כָּל־מְשַׂנְאַי אָהֲבוּ מָוֶת׃ 9.12. אִם־חָכַמְתָּ חָכַמְתָּ לָּךְ וְלַצְתָּ לְבַדְּךָ תִשָּׂא׃ 1.15. My son, walk not thou in the way with them, restrain thy foot from their path;" 1.16. For their feet run to evil, and they make haste to shed blood." 1.17. For in vain the net is spread in the eyes of any bird;" 1.18. And these lie in wait for their own blood, they lurk for their own lives." 1.19. So are the ways of every one that is greedy of gain; it taketh away the life of the owners thereof." 8.22. The LORD made me as the beginning of His way, The first of His works of old." 8.36. But he that misseth me wrongeth his own soul; All they that hate me love death.’" 9.12. If thou art wise, thou art wise for thyself; And if thou scornest, thou alone shalt bear it.’"
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 171, 170 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.64-1.67 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.64. I, indeed, am not a place, but I am in a place, and every existing being is so in a similar manner. So that which is surrounded differs from that which surrounds it; but the Deity, being surrounded by nothing, is necessarily itself its own place. And there is an evidence in support of my view of the matter in the following sacred oracle delivered with respect to Abraham: "He came unto the place of which the Lord God had told him: and having looked up with his eyes, he saw the place afar off. 1.65. Tell me, now, did he who had come to the place see it afar off? Or perhaps it is but an identical expression for two different things, one of which is the divine world, and the other, God, who existed before the world. 1.66. But he who was conducted by wisdom comes to the former place, having found that the main part and end of propitiation is the divine word, in which he who is fixed does not as yet attain to such a height as to penetrate to the essence of God, but sees him afar off; or, rather, I should say, he is not able even to behold him afar off, but he only discerns this fact, that God is at a distance from every creature, and that any comprehension of him is removed to a great distance from all human intellect. 1.67. Perhaps, however, the historian, by this allegorical form of expression, does not here mean by his expression, "place," the Cause of all things; but the idea which he intends to convey may be something of this sort; --he came to the place, and looking up with his eyes he saw the very place to which he had come, which was a very long way from the God who may not be named nor spoken of, and who is in every way incomprehensible. XII.
5. New Testament, John, 1.18, 1.21, 7.20, 8.48, 10.20, 15.4-15.5, 15.7, 15.9-15.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.18. No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him. 1.21. They asked him, "What then? Are you Elijah?"He said, "I am not.""Are you the Prophet?"He answered, "No. 7.20. The multitude answered, "You have a demon! Who seeks to kill you? 8.48. Then the Jews answered him, "Don't we say well that you are a Samaritan, and have a demon? 10.20. Many of them said, "He has a demon, and is insane! Why do you listen to him? 15.4. Remain in me, and I in you. As the branch can't bear fruit by itself, unless it remains in the vine, so neither can you, unless you remain in me. 15.5. I am the vine. You are the branches. He who remains in me, and I in him, the same bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing. 15.7. If you remain in me, and my words remain in you, you will ask whatever you desire, and it will be done to you. 15.9. Even as the Father has loved me, I also have loved you. Remain in my love. 15.10. If you keep my commandments, you will remain in my love; even as I have kept my Father's commandments, and remain in his love.
6. New Testament, Luke, 1.57, 2.7, 5.32, 7.24, 7.31-7.35, 15.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.57. Now the time that Elizabeth should give birth was fulfilled, and she brought forth a son. 2.7. She brought forth her firstborn son, and she wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a feeding trough, because there was no room for them in the inn. 5.32. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. 7.24. When John's messengers had departed, he began to tell the multitudes about John, "What did you go out into the wilderness to see? A reed shaken by the wind? 7.31. The Lord said, "To what then will I liken the people of this generation? What are they like? 7.32. They are like children who sit in the marketplace, and call one to another, saying, 'We piped to you, and you didn't dance. We mourned, and you didn't weep.' 7.33. For John the Baptizer came neither eating bread nor drinking wine, and you say, 'He has a demon.' 7.34. The Son of Man has come eating and drinking, and you say, 'Behold, a gluttonous man, and a drunkard; a friend of tax collectors and sinners!' 7.35. Wisdom is justified by all her children. 15.7. I tell you that even so there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents, than over ninety-nine righteous people who need no repentance.
7. New Testament, Mark, 2.2, 2.16-2.22, 3.22, 6.12, 6.14-6.15, 6.30-6.44, 14.7, 14.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.2. Immediately many were gathered together, so that there was no more room, not even around the door; and he spoke the word to them. 2.16. The scribes and the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with the sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, "Why is it that he eats and drinks with tax collectors and sinners? 2.17. When Jesus heard it, he said to them, "Those who are healthy have no need for a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. 2.18. John's disciples and the Pharisees were fasting, and they came and asked him, "Why do John's disciples and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples don't fast? 2.19. Jesus said to them, "Can the groomsmen fast while the bridegroom is with them? As long as they have the bridegroom with them, they can't fast. 2.20. But the days will come when the bridegroom will be taken away from them, and then will they fast in that day. 2.21. No one sews a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old garment, or else the patch shrinks and the new tears away from the old, and a worse hole is made. 2.22. No one puts new wine into old wineskins, or else the new wine will burst the skins, and the wine pours out, and the skins will be destroyed; but they put new wine into fresh wineskins. 3.22. The scribes who came down from Jerusalem said, "He has Beelzebul," and, "By the prince of the demons he casts out the demons. 6.12. They went out and preached that people should repent. 6.14. King Herod heard this, for his name had become known, and he said, "John the Baptizer has risen from the dead, and therefore these powers are at work in him. 6.15. But others said, "It is Elijah." Others said, "It is the Prophet, or like one of the prophets. 6.30. The apostles gathered themselves together to Jesus, and they told him all things, whatever they had done, and whatever they had taught. 6.31. He said to them, "You come apart into a deserted place, and rest awhile." For there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat. 6.32. They went away in the boat to a desert place by themselves. 6.33. They saw them going, and many recognized him and ran there on foot from all the cities. They arrived before them and came together to him. 6.34. Jesus came out, saw a great multitude, and he had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd, and he began to teach them many things. 6.35. When it was late in the day, his disciples came to him, and said, "This place is deserted, and it is late in the day. 6.36. Send them away, that they may go into the surrounding country and villages, and buy themselves bread, for they have nothing to eat. 6.37. But he answered them, "You give them something to eat."They asked him, "Shall we go and buy two hundred denarii worth of bread, and give them something to eat? 6.38. He said to them, "How many loaves do you have? Go see."When they knew, they said, "Five, and two fish. 6.39. He commanded them that everyone should sit down in groups on the green grass. 6.40. They sat down in ranks, by hundreds and by fifties. 6.41. He took the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, he blessed and broke the loaves, and he gave to his disciples to set before them, and he divided the two fish among them all. 6.42. They all ate, and were filled. 6.43. They took up twelve baskets full of broken pieces and also of the fish. 6.44. Those who ate the loaves were five thousand men. 14.7. For you always have the poor with you, and whenever you want to, you can do them good; but you will not always have me. 14.26. When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.
8. New Testament, Matthew, 1.25, 3.2, 9.32-9.33, 11.1-11.15, 11.17-11.20, 11.25-11.30, 12.24, 14.13-14.21, 16.14, 17.9-17.13, 26.30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.25. and didn't know her sexually until she had brought forth her firstborn son. He named him Jesus. 3.2. Repent, for the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand! 9.32. As they went out, behold, a mute man who was demon possessed was brought to him. 9.33. When the demon was cast out, the mute man spoke. The multitudes marveled, saying, "Nothing like this has ever been seen in Israel! 11.1. It happened that when Jesus had finished directing his twelve disciples, he departed from there to teach and preach in their cities. 11.2. Now when John heard in the prison the works of Christ, he sent two of his disciples 11.3. and said to him, "Are you he who comes, or should we look for another? 11.4. Jesus answered them, "Go and tell John the things which you hear and see: 11.5. the blind receive their sight, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised up, and the poor have good news preached to them. 11.6. Blessed is he who finds no occasion for stumbling in me. 11.7. As these went their way, Jesus began to say to the multitudes concerning John, "What did you go out into the wilderness to see? A reed shaken by the wind? 11.8. But what did you go out to see? A man in soft clothing? Behold, those who wear soft clothing are in king's houses. 11.9. But why did you go out? To see a prophet? Yes, I tell you, and much more than a prophet. 11.10. For this is he, of whom it is written, 'Behold, I send my messenger before your face, who will prepare your way before you.' 11.11. Most assuredly I tell you, among those who are born of women there has not arisen anyone greater than John the Baptizer; yet he who is least in the Kingdom of Heaven is greater than he. 11.12. From the days of John the Baptizer until now, the Kingdom of Heaven suffers violence, and the violent take it by force. 11.13. For all the prophets and the law prophesied until John. 11.14. If you are willing to receive it, this is Elijah, who is to come. 11.15. He who has ears to hear, let him hear. 11.17. and say, 'We played the flute for you, and you didn't dance. We mourned for you, and you didn't lament.' 11.18. For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, 'He has a demon.' 11.19. The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, 'Behold, a gluttonous man and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!' But wisdom is justified by her children. 11.20. Then he began to denounce the cities in which most of his mighty works had been done, because they didn't repent. 11.25. At that time, Jesus answered, "I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you hid these things from the wise and understanding, and revealed them to infants. 11.26. Yes, Father, for so it was well-pleasing in your sight. 11.27. All things have been delivered to me by my Father. No one knows the Son, except the Father; neither does anyone know the Father, except the Son, and he to whom the Son desires to reveal him. 11.28. Come to me, all you who labor and are heavily burdened, and I will give you rest. 11.29. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am humble and lowly in heart; and you will find rest for your souls. 11.30. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. 12.24. But when the Pharisees heard it, they said, "This man does not cast out demons, except by Beelzebul, the prince of the demons. 14.13. Now when Jesus heard this, he withdrew from there in a boat, to a deserted place apart. When the multitudes heard it, they followed him on foot from the cities. 14.14. Jesus went out, and he saw a great multitude. He had compassion on them, and healed their sick. 14.15. When evening had come, his disciples came to him, saying, "This place is deserted, and the hour is already late. Send the multitudes away, that they may go into the villages, and buy themselves food. 14.16. But Jesus said to them, "They don't need to go away. You give them something to eat. 14.17. They told him, "We only have here five loaves and two fish. 14.18. He said, "Bring them here to me. 14.19. He commanded the multitudes to sit down on the grass; and he took the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, he blessed, broke and gave the loaves to the disciples, and the disciples gave to the multitudes. 14.20. They all ate, and were filled. They took up twelve baskets full of that which remained left over from the broken pieces. 14.21. Those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children. 16.14. They said, "Some say John the Baptizer, some, Elijah, and others, Jeremiah, or one of the prophets. 17.9. As they were coming down from the mountain, Jesus commanded them, saying, "Don't tell anyone what you saw, until the Son of Man has risen from the dead. 17.10. His disciples asked him, saying, "Then why do the scribes say that Elijah must come first? 17.11. Jesus answered them, "Elijah indeed comes first, and will restore all things 17.12. but I tell you that Elijah has come already, and they didn't recognize him, but did to him whatever they wanted to. Even so the Son of Man will also suffer by them. 17.13. Then the disciples understood that he spoke to them of John the Baptizer. 26.30. When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.
9. Anon., The Acts of John, 101-102, 95-100 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

100. Now the multitude of one aspect (al. of one aspect) that is about the cross is the lower nature: and they whom thou seest in the cross, if they have not one form, it is because not yet hath every member of him that came down been comprehended. But when the human nature (or the upper nature) is taken up, and the race which draweth near unto me and obeyeth my voice, he that now heareth me shall be united therewith, and shall no more be that which now he is, but above them, as I also now am. For so long as thou callest not thyself mine, I am not that which I am (or was): but if thou hear me, thou, hearing, shalt be as I am, and I shall be that which I was, when I thee as I am with myself. For from me thou art that (which I am). Care not therefore for the many, and them that are outside the mystery despise; for know thou that I am wholly with the Father, and the Father with me.
10. Anon., Acts of John, 101-102, 95-100 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

100. Now the multitude of one aspect (al. of one aspect) that is about the cross is the lower nature: and they whom thou seest in the cross, if they have not one form, it is because not yet hath every member of him that came down been comprehended. But when the human nature (or the upper nature) is taken up, and the race which draweth near unto me and obeyeth my voice, he that now heareth me shall be united therewith, and shall no more be that which now he is, but above them, as I also now am. For so long as thou callest not thyself mine, I am not that which I am (or was): but if thou hear me, thou, hearing, shalt be as I am, and I shall be that which I was, when I thee as I am with myself. For from me thou art that (which I am). Care not therefore for the many, and them that are outside the mystery despise; for know thou that I am wholly with the Father, and the Father with me.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
angels Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
aramaic Sigal, The Halakhah of Jesus of Nazareth According to the Gospel of Matthew (2007) 71
bacchic imagery Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
banquet Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 200
blake, william Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
children Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
church Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 347
cult songs, mystery cult Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
dance, round / circular Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
elijah Sigal, The Halakhah of Jesus of Nazareth According to the Gospel of Matthew (2007) 71
eschatology Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
fast(ing) Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 347
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 211
gnosis Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
gospels, new testament Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
initiation Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
jesus, son of god as Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
jesus, teacher (or sage) in the images of Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 200
johannine logos, firstborn (or son) image of Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
john, gospel of Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
john the baptist Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
kingdom of god Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
literature, greek, imperial Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
luke, gospel of Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
memra, shekhinah (and voice) related to Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
messiah, philos logos and Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
messiah, son of god and Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
messianism, stoic logos related to Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
messianism Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
origen Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
pathos / experience Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
personified wisdom, teacher (or sage) images of Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 200
power, power of god, powers Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
q (sayings source) Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 347, 351
schweitzer, a. Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 530
schweitzer, quest, delay of parousia Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 530
schweitzer, quest, jesus, changed views Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 530
schweitzer, quest, jesus, galilean ministry Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 530
schweitzer, quest, john the baptist Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 530
schweitzer, quest, messianic secret Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 530
sending, divine emissary Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
shefa, memra related to Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
shout of joy' Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 211
son of god, jesus as Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
son of god, messiah and Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
spirit, holy spirit Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116
stoic logos, messianism related to Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 185
symbol(ic), symbolism Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 351
teacher, images (or sage-) of personified wisdom related to Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 200
teacher, images of jesus as Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 200
understanding, embodied Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 96
wedding Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 347, 351
wisdom Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 347; Rowland, The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament (2009) 116