Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8255
New Testament, John, 12.20-12.21


Ἦσαν δὲ Ἕλληνές τινες ἐκ τῶν ἀναβαινόντων ἵνα προσκυνήσωσιν ἐν τῇ ἑορτῇ·Now there were certain Greeks among those that went up to worship at the feast.


οὗτοι οὖν προσῆλθαν Φιλίππῳ τῷ ἀπὸ Βηθσαιδὰ τῆς Γαλιλαίας, καὶ ἠρώτων αὐτὸν λέγοντες Κύριε, θέλομεν τὸν Ἰησοῦν ἰδεῖν.These, therefore, came to Philip, who was from Bethsaida of Galilee, and asked him, saying, "Sir, we want to see Jesus.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 6 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

107a. that the soul is immortal and imperishable, and our souls will exist somewhere in another world. I, said Cebes, have nothing more to say against that, and I cannot doubt your conclusions. But if Simmias, or anyone else, has anything to say, he would do well to speak, for I do not know to what other time than the present he could defer speaking, if he wishes to say or hear anything about those matters. But, said Simmias, I don’t see how I can doubt, either, as to the result of the discussion; but the subject is so great
4. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 8, 7 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 19.338, 20.145-20.146, 20.173-20.177 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19.338. 1. When Agrippa had finished what I have above related at Berytus, he removed to Tiberias, a city of Galilee. Now he was in great esteem among other kings. Accordingly there came to him Antiochus, king of Commagene, Sampsigeramus, king of Emesa, and Cotys, who was king of the Lesser Armenia, and Polemo, who was king of Pontus, as also Herod his brother, who was king of Chalcis. 20.145. 3. But as for Bernice, she lived a widow a long while after the death of Herod [king of Chalcis], who was both her husband and her uncle; but when the report went that she had criminal conversation with her brother, [Agrippa, junior,] she persuaded Poleme, who was king of Cilicia, to be circumcised, and to marry her, as supposing that by this means she should prove those calumnies upon her to be false; 20.146. and Poleme was prevailed upon, and that chiefly on account of her riches. Yet did not this matrimony endure long; but Bernice left Poleme, and, as was said, with impure intentions. So he forsook at once this matrimony, and the Jewish religion; 20.173. 7. And now it was that a great sedition arose between the Jews that inhabited Caesarea, and the Syrians who dwelt there also, concerning their equal right to the privileges belonging to citizens; for the Jews claimed the pre-eminence, because Herod their king was the builder of Caesarea, and because he was by birth a Jew. Now the Syrians did not deny what was alleged about Herod; but they said that Caesarea was formerly called Strato’s Tower, and that then there was not one Jewish inhabitant. 20.174. When the presidents of that country heard of these disorders, they caught the authors of them on both sides, and tormented them with stripes, and by that means put a stop to the disturbance for a time. 20.175. But the Jewish citizens depending on their wealth, and on that account despising the Syrians, reproached them again, and hoped to provoke them by such reproaches. 20.176. However, the Syrians, though they were inferior in wealth, yet valuing themselves highly on this account, that the greatest part of the Roman soldiers that were there were either of Caesarea or Sebaste, they also for some time used reproachful language to the Jews also; and thus it was, till at length they came to throwing stones at one another, and several were wounded, and fell on both sides, though still the Jews were the conquerors. 20.177. But when Felix saw that this quarrel was become a kind of war, he came upon them on the sudden, and desired the Jews to desist; and when they refused so to do, he armed his soldiers, and sent them out upon them, and slew many of them, and took more of them alive, and permitted his soldiers to plunder some of the houses of the citizens, which were full of riches.
6. Mishnah, Niddah, 2.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.1. Every hand that makes frequent examination: In the case of women is praiseworthy, But in the case of men it ought to be cut off. In the case of a deaf, an person not of sound senses, a blind or an insane woman, if other women of sound senses are available they attend to her, and they may eat terumah. It is the custom of the daughters of Israel to have intercourse using two testing-rags, one for the man and the other for herself. Virtuous women prepare also a third rag to prepare the \"house\" [before intercourse]."
7. New Testament, Acts, 8.27, 13.16, 28.24-28.31 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.27. He arose and went. Behold, there was a man of Ethiopia, a eunuch of great authority under Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, who was over all her treasure, who had come to Jerusalem to worship. 13.16. Paul stood up, and beckoning with his hand said, "Men of Israel, and you who fear God, listen. 28.24. Some believed the things which were spoken, and some disbelieved. 28.25. When they didn't agree among themselves, they departed after Paul had spoken one word, "The Holy Spirit spoke well through Isaiah, the prophet, to our fathers 28.26. saying, 'Go to this people, and say, In hearing, you will hear, And will in no way understand. In seeing, you will see, And will in no way perceive. 28.27. For this people's heart has grown callous. Their ears are dull of hearing. Their eyes they have closed. Lest they should see with their eyes, Hear with their ears, Understand with their heart, And would turn again, And I would heal them.' 28.28. Be it known therefore to you, that the salvation of God is sent to the Gentiles. They will also hear. 28.29. When he had said these words, the Jews departed, having a great dispute among themselves. 28.30. Paul stayed two whole years in his own rented house, and received all who went in to him 28.31. preaching the Kingdom of God, and teaching the things concerning the Lord Jesus Christ with all boldness, without hinderance.
8. New Testament, Romans, 1.3, 1.5-1.15, 1.17, 2.17, 3.24, 4.25, 7.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.3. concerning his Son, who was born of the seed of David according to the flesh 1.5. through whom we received grace and apostleship, for obedience of faith among all the nations, for his name's sake; 1.6. among whom you are also called to belong to Jesus Christ; 1.7. to all who are in Rome, beloved of God, called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. 1.8. First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you, that your faith is proclaimed throughout the whole world. 1.9. For God is my witness, whom I serve in my spirit in the gospel of his Son, how unceasingly I make mention of you always in my prayers 1.10. requesting, if by any means now at last I may be prospered by the will of God to come to you. 1.11. For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift, to the end that you may be established; 1.12. that is, that I with you may be encouraged in you, each of us by the other's faith, both yours and mine. 1.13. Now I don't desire to have you unaware, brothers, that I often planned to come to you, and was hindered so far, that I might have some fruit among you also, even as among the rest of the Gentiles. 1.14. I am debtor both to Greeks and to foreigners, both to the wise and to the foolish. 1.15. So, as much as is in me, I am eager to preach the gospel to you also who are in Rome. 1.17. For in it is revealed God's righteousness from faith to faith. As it is written, "But the righteous shall live by faith. 2.17. Indeed you bear the name of a Jew, and rest on the law, and glory in God 3.24. being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus; 4.25. who was delivered up for our trespasses, and was raised for our justification. 7.1. Or don't you know, brothers (for I speak to men who know the law), that the law has dominion over a man for as long as he lives?
9. New Testament, John, 1.26-1.27, 1.29, 1.31-1.34, 1.36, 1.41, 1.43-1.51, 2.1, 2.3-2.5, 2.12-2.13, 3.4-3.9, 3.22, 4.3, 4.17-4.18, 4.20-4.25, 4.35, 4.44, 4.46-4.49, 4.54, 5.1, 5.6, 6.1, 6.5-6.7, 6.9, 6.14-6.15, 6.60, 7.1-7.4, 7.8, 7.10, 7.14, 7.27, 7.31, 7.40-7.44, 7.52, 9.1, 9.3-9.5, 9.17, 9.38, 10.1, 10.40-10.41, 11.1, 11.15, 11.17-11.44, 11.54-11.55, 12.1-12.8, 12.12, 12.14, 12.21-12.22, 12.34, 13.2, 13.25, 14.8-14.10, 15.26, 18.10, 19.38-19.42, 20.17, 20.25, 21.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.26. John answered them, "I baptize in water, but among you stands one whom you don't know. 1.27. He is the one who comes after me, who has come to be before me, whose sandal strap I'm not worthy to untie. 1.29. The next day, he saw Jesus coming to him, and said, "Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! 1.31. I didn't know him, but for this reason I came baptizing in water: that he would be revealed to Israel. 1.32. John testified, saying, "I have seen the Spirit descending like a dove out of heaven, and it remained on him. 1.33. I didn't recognize him, but he who sent me to baptize in water, he said to me, 'On whomever you will see the Spirit descending, and remaining on him, the same is he who baptizes in the Holy Spirit.' 1.34. I have seen, and have testified that this is the Son of God. 1.36. and he looked at Jesus as he walked, and said, "Behold, the Lamb of God! 1.41. He first found his own brother, Simon, and said to him, "We have found the Messiah!" (which is, being interpreted, Christ). 1.43. On the next day, he was determined to go out into Galilee, and he found Philip. Jesus said to him, "Follow me. 1.44. Now Philip was from Bethsaida, of the city of Andrew and Peter. 1.45. Philip found Nathanael, and said to him, "We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, wrote: Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. 1.46. Nathanael said to him, "Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?"Philip said to him, "Come and see. 1.47. Jesus saw Nathanael coming to him, and said about him, "Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom is no deceit! 1.48. Nathanael said to him, "How do you know me?"Jesus answered him, "Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you. 1.49. Nathanael answered him, "Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are King of Israel! 1.50. Jesus answered him, "Because I told you, 'I saw you underneath the fig tree,' do you believe? You will see greater things than these! 1.51. He said to him, "Most assuredly, I tell you, hereafter you will see heaven opened, and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man. 2.1. The third day, there was a marriage in Cana of Galilee. Jesus' mother was there. 2.3. When the wine ran out, Jesus' mother said to him, "They have no wine. 2.4. Jesus said to her, "Woman, what does that have to do with you and me? My hour has not yet come. 2.5. His mother said to the servants, "Whatever he says to you, do it. 2.12. After this, he went down to Capernaum, he, and his mother, his brothers, and his disciples; and they stayed there a few days. 2.13. The Passover of the Jews was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 3.4. Nicodemus said to him, "How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother's womb, and be born? 3.5. Jesus answered, "Most assuredly I tell you, unless one is born of water and spirit, he can't enter into the Kingdom of God! 3.6. That which is born of the flesh is flesh. That which is born of the Spirit is spirit. 3.7. Don't marvel that I said to you, 'You must be born anew.' 3.8. The wind blows where it wants to, and you hear its sound, but don't know where it comes from and where it is going. So is everyone who is born of the Spirit. 3.9. Nicodemus answered him, "How can these things be? 3.22. After these things, Jesus came with his disciples into the land of Judea. He stayed there with them, and baptized. 4.3. he left Judea, and departed into Galilee. 4.17. The woman answered, "I have no husband."Jesus said to her, "You said well, 'I have no husband,' 4.18. for you have had five husbands; and he whom you now have is not your husband. This you have said truly. 4.20. Our fathers worshiped in this mountain, and you Jews say that in Jerusalem is the place where people ought to worship. 4.21. Jesus said to her, "Woman, believe me, the hour comes, when neither in this mountain, nor in Jerusalem, will you worship the Father. 4.22. You worship that which you don't know. We worship that which we know; for salvation is from the Jews. 4.23. But the hour comes, and now is, when the true worshippers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father seeks such to be his worshippers. 4.24. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth. 4.25. The woman said to him, "I know that Messiah comes," (he who is called Christ). "When he has come, he will declare to us all things. 4.35. Don't you say, 'There are yet four months until the harvest?' Behold, I tell you, lift up your eyes, and look at the fields, that they are white for harvest already. 4.44. For Jesus himself testified that a prophet has no honor in his own country. 4.46. Jesus came therefore again to Cana of Galilee, where he made the water into wine. There was a certain nobleman whose son was sick at Capernaum. 4.47. When he heard that Jesus had come out of Judea into Galilee, he went to him, and begged him that he would come down and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. 4.48. Jesus therefore said to him, "Unless you see signs and wonders, you will in no way believe. 4.49. The nobleman said to him, "Sir, come down before my child dies. 4.54. This is again the second sign that Jesus did, having come out of Judea into Galilee. 5.1. After these things, there was a feast of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 5.6. When Jesus saw him lying there, and knew that he had been sick for a long time, he asked him, "Do you want to be made well? 6.1. After these things, Jesus went away to the other side of the sea of Galilee, which is also called the Sea of Tiberias. 6.5. Jesus therefore lifting up his eyes, and seeing that a great multitude was coming to him, said to Philip, "Where are we to buy bread, that these may eat? 6.6. This he said to test him, for he himself knew what he would do. 6.7. Philip answered him, "Two hundred denarii worth of bread is not sufficient for them, that everyone of them may receive a little. 6.9. There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish, but what are these among so many? 6.14. When therefore the people saw the sign which Jesus did, they said, "This is truly the prophet who comes into the world. 6.15. Jesus therefore, perceiving that they were about to come and take him by force, to make him king, withdrew again to the mountain by himself. 6.60. Therefore many of his disciples, when they heard this, said, "This is a hard saying! Who can listen to it? 7.1. After these things, Jesus was walking in Galilee, for he wouldn't walk in Judea, because the Jews sought to kill him. 7.2. Now the feast of the Jews, the Feast of Booths, was at hand. 7.3. His brothers therefore said to him, "Depart from here, and go into Judea, that your disciples also may see your works which you do. 7.4. For no one does anything in secret, and himself seeks to be known openly. If you do these things, reveal yourself to the world. 7.8. You go up to the feast. I am not yet going up to this feast, because my time is not yet fulfilled. 7.10. But when his brothers had gone up to the feast, then he also went up, not publicly, but as it were in secret. 7.14. But when it was now the midst of the feast, Jesus went up into the temple and taught. 7.27. However we know where this man comes from, but when the Christ comes, no one will know where he comes from. 7.31. But of the multitude, many believed in him. They said, "When the Christ comes, he won't do more signs than those which this man has done, will he? 7.40. Many of the multitude therefore, when they heard these words, said, "This is truly the prophet. 7.41. Others said, "This is the Christ." But some said, "What, does the Christ come out of Galilee? 7.42. Hasn't the Scripture said that the Christ comes of the seed of David, and from Bethlehem, the village where David was? 7.43. So there arose a division in the multitude because of him. 7.44. Some of them would have arrested him, but no one laid hands on him. 7.52. They answered him, "Are you also from Galilee? Search, and see that no prophet has arisen out of Galilee. 9.1. As he passed by, he saw a man blind from birth. 9.3. Jesus answered, "Neither did this man sin, nor his parents; but, that the works of God might be revealed in him. 9.4. I must work the works of him who sent me, while it is day. The night is coming, when no one can work. 9.5. While I am in the world, I am the light of the world. 9.17. Therefore they asked the blind man again, "What do you say about him, because he opened your eyes?"He said, "He is a prophet. 9.38. He said, "Lord, I believe!" and he worshiped him. 10.1. Most assuredly, I tell you, one who doesn't enter by the door into the sheep fold, but climbs up some other way, the same is a thief and a robber. 10.40. He went away again beyond the Jordan into the place where John was baptizing at first, and there he stayed. 10.41. Many came to him. They said, "John indeed did no sign, but everything that John said about this man is true. 11.1. Now a certain man was sick, Lazarus from Bethany, of the village of Mary and her sister, Martha. 11.15. I am glad for your sakes that I was not there, so that you may believe. Nevertheless, let's go to him. 11.17. So when Jesus came, he found that he had been in the tomb four days already. 11.18. Now Bethany was near Jerusalem, about fifteen stadia away. 11.19. Many of the Jews had joined the women around Martha and Mary, to console them concerning their brother. 11.20. Then when Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went and met him, but Mary stayed in the house. 11.21. Therefore Martha said to Jesus, "Lord, if you would have been here, my brother wouldn't have died. 11.22. Even now I know that, whatever you ask of God, God will give you. 11.23. Jesus said to her, "Your brother will rise again. 11.24. Martha said to him, "I know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day. 11.25. Jesus said to her, "I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me, though he die, yet will he live. 11.26. Whoever lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this? 11.27. She said to him, "Yes, Lord. I have come to believe that you are the Christ, God's Son, he who comes into the world. 11.28. When she had said this, she went away, and called Mary, her sister, secretly, saying, "The Teacher is here, and is calling you. 11.29. When she heard this, she arose quickly, and went to him. 11.30. Now Jesus had not yet come into the village, but was in the place where Martha met him. 11.31. Then the Jews who were with her in the house, and were consoling her, when they saw Mary, that she rose up quickly and went out, followed her, saying, "She is going to the tomb to weep there. 11.32. Therefore when Mary came to where Jesus was, and saw him, she fell down at his feet, saying to him, "Lord, if you would have been here, my brother wouldn't have died. 11.33. When Jesus therefore saw her weeping, and the Jews weeping who came with her, he groaned in the spirit, and was troubled 11.34. and said, "Where have you laid him?"They told him, "Lord, come and see. 11.35. Jesus wept. 11.36. The Jews therefore said, "See how much affection he had for him! 11.37. Some of them said, "Couldn't this man, who opened the eyes of him who was blind, have also kept this man from dying? 11.38. Jesus therefore, again groaning in himself, came to the tomb. Now it was a cave, and a stone lay against it. 11.39. Jesus said, "Take away the stone."Martha, the sister of him who was dead, said to him, "Lord, by this time there is a stench, for he has been dead four days. 11.40. Jesus said to her, "Didn't I tell you that if you believed, you would see God's glory? 11.41. So they took away the stone from the place where the dead man was lying. Jesus lifted up his eyes, and said, "Father, I thank you that you listened to me. 11.42. I know that you always listen to me, but because of the multitude that stands around I said this, that they may believe that you sent me. 11.43. When he had said this, he cried with a loud voice, "Lazarus, come out! 11.44. He who was dead came out, bound hand and foot with wrappings, and his face was wrapped around with a cloth. Jesus said to them, "Free him, and let him go. 11.54. Jesus therefore walked no more openly among the Jews, but departed from there into the country near the wilderness, to a city called Ephraim. He stayed there with his disciples. 11.55. Now the Passover of the Jews was at hand. Many went up from the country to Jerusalem before the Passover, to purify themselves. 12.1. Then six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, who had been dead, whom he raised from the dead. 12.2. So they made him a supper there. Martha served, but Lazarus was one of those who sat at the table with him. 12.3. Mary, therefore, took a pound of ointment of pure nard, very precious, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair. The house was filled with the fragrance of the ointment. 12.4. Then Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, one of his disciples, who would betray him, said 12.5. Why wasn't this ointment sold for three hundred denarii, and given to the poor? 12.6. Now he said this, not because he cared for the poor, but because he was a thief, and having the money box, used to steal what was put into it. 12.7. But Jesus said, "Leave her alone. She has kept this for the day of my burial. 12.8. For you always have the poor with you, but you don't always have me. 12.12. On the next day a great multitude had come to the feast. When they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem 12.14. Jesus, having found a young donkey, sat on it. As it is written 12.21. These, therefore, came to Philip, who was from Bethsaida of Galilee, and asked him, saying, "Sir, we want to see Jesus. 12.22. Philip came and told Andrew, and in turn, Andrew came with Philip, and they told Jesus. 12.34. The multitude answered him, "We have heard out of the law that the Christ remains forever. How do you say, 'The Son of Man must be lifted up?' Who is this Son of Man? 13.2. After supper, the devil having already put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, to betray him 13.25. He, leaning back, as he was, on Jesus' breast, asked him, "Lord, who is it? 14.8. Philip said to him, "Lord, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us. 14.9. Jesus said to him, "Have I been with you such a long time, and do you not know me, Philip? He who has seen me has seen the Father. How do you say, 'Show us the Father?' 14.10. Don't you believe that I am in the Father, and the Father in me? The words that I tell you, I speak not from myself; but the Father who lives in me does his works. 15.26. When the Counselor has come, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will testify about me. 18.10. Simon Peter therefore, having a sword, drew it, and struck the high priest's servant, and cut off his right ear. The servant's name was Malchus. 19.38. After these things, Joseph of Arimathaea, being a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews, asked of Pilate that he might take away Jesus' body. Pilate gave him permission. He came therefore and took away his body. 19.39. Nicodemus, who at first came to Jesus by night, also came bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about a hundred Roman pounds. 19.40. So they took Jesus' body, and bound it in linen cloths with the spices, as the custom of the Jews is to bury. 19.41. Now in the place where he was crucified there was a garden. In the garden a new tomb in which no man had ever yet been laid. 19.42. Then because of the Jews' Preparation Day (for the tomb was near at hand) they laid Jesus there. 20.17. Jesus said to her, "Don't touch me, for I haven't yet ascended to my Father; but go to my brothers, and tell them, 'I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.' 20.25. The other disciples therefore said to him, "We have seen the Lord!"But he said to them, "Unless I see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my hand into his side, I will not believe. 21.11. Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land, full of great fish, one hundred fifty-three; and even though there were so many, the net wasn't torn.
10. New Testament, Luke, 6.6, 6.13-6.16, 7.12-7.13, 8.1-8.3, 8.45, 9.1, 10.1-10.12, 10.17-10.20, 10.39-10.42, 13.11-13.12, 24.10, 24.27 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.6. It also happened on another Sabbath that he entered into the synagogue and taught. There was a man there, and his right hand was withered. 6.13. When it was day, he called his disciples, and from them he chose twelve, whom he also named apostles: 6.14. Simon, whom he also named Peter; Andrew, his brother; James; John; Philip; Bartholomew; 6.15. Matthew; Thomas; James, the son of Alphaeus; Simon, who was called the Zealot; 6.16. Judas the son of James; and Judas Iscariot, who also became a traitor. 7.12. Now when he drew near to the gate of the city, behold, one who was dead was carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. Many people of the city were with her. 7.13. When the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her, and said to her, "Don't cry. 8.1. It happened soon afterwards, that he went about through cities and villages, preaching and bringing the good news of the Kingdom of God. With him were the twelve 8.2. and certain women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities: Mary who was called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out; 8.3. and Joanna, the wife of Chuzas, Herod's steward; Susanna; and many others; who ministered to them from their possessions. 8.45. Jesus said, "Who touched me?"When all denied it, Peter and those with him said, "Master, the multitudes press and jostle you, and you say, 'Who touched me?' 9.1. He called the twelve together, and gave them power and authority over all demons, and to cure diseases. 10.1. Now after these things, the Lord also appointed seventy others, and sent them two by two before his face into every city and place, where he was about to come. 10.2. Then he said to them, "The harvest is indeed plentiful, but the laborers are few. Pray therefore to the Lord of the harvest, that he may send out laborers into his harvest. 10.3. Go your ways. Behold, I send you out as lambs among wolves. 10.4. Carry no purse, nor wallet, nor sandals. Greet no one on the way. 10.5. Into whatever house you enter, first say, 'Peace be to this house.' 10.6. If a son of peace is there, your peace will rest on him; but if not, it will return to you. 10.7. Remain in that same house, eating and drinking the things they give, for the laborer is worthy of his wages. Don't go from house to house. 10.8. Into whatever city you enter, and they receive you, eat the things that are set before you. 10.9. Heal the sick who are therein, and tell them, 'The Kingdom of God has come near to you.' 10.10. But into whatever city you enter, and they don't receive you, go out into the streets of it and say 10.11. 'Even the dust from your city that clings to us, we wipe off against you. Nevertheless know this, that the Kingdom of God has come near to you.' 10.12. I tell you, it will be more tolerable in that day for Sodom than for that city. 10.17. The seventy returned with joy, saying, "Lord, even the demons are subject to us in your name! 10.18. He said to them, "I saw Satan having fallen like lightning from heaven. 10.19. Behold, I give you authority to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy. Nothing will in any way hurt you. 10.20. Nevertheless, don't rejoice in this, that the spirits are subject to you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven. 10.39. She had a sister called Mary, who also sat at Jesus' feet, and heard his word. 10.40. But Martha was distracted with much serving, and she came up to him, and said, "Lord, don't you care that my sister left me to serve alone? Ask her therefore to help me. 10.41. Jesus answered her, "Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things 10.42. but one thing is needed. Mary has chosen the good part, which will not be taken away from her. 13.11. Behold, there was a woman who had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years, and she was bent over, and could in no way straighten herself up. 13.12. When Jesus saw her, he called her, and said to her, "Woman, you are freed from your infirmity. 24.10. Now they were Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James. The other women with them told these things to the apostles. 24.27. Beginning from Moses and from all the prophets, he explained to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself.
11. New Testament, Mark, 3.1, 3.16-3.19, 5.30, 6.7, 7.27-7.29, 15.40, 16.1, 16.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.1. He entered again into the synagogue, and there was a man there who had his hand withered. 3.16. Simon, to whom he gave the name Peter; 3.17. James the son of Zebedee; John, the brother of James, and he surnamed them Boanerges, which means, Sons of Thunder; 3.18. Andrew; Philip; Bartholomew; Matthew; Thomas; James, the son of Alphaeus; Thaddaeus; Simon the Zealot; 3.19. and Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed him. He came into a house. 5.30. Immediately Jesus, perceiving in himself that the power had gone out from him, turned around in the crowd, and asked, "Who touched my clothes? 6.7. He called to himself the twelve, and began to send them out two by two; and he gave them authority over the unclean spirits. 7.27. But Jesus said to her, "Let the children be filled first, for it is not appropriate to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs. 7.28. But she answered him, "Yes, Lord. Yet even the dogs under the table eat the children's crumbs. 7.29. He said to her, "For this saying, go your way. The demon has gone out of your daughter. 15.40. There were also women watching from afar, among whom were both Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James the less and of Joses, and Salome; 16.1. When the Sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James, and Salome, bought spices, that they might come and anoint him. 16.8. They went out, and fled from the tomb, for trembling and astonishment had come on them. They said nothing to anyone; for they were afraid.
12. New Testament, Matthew, 10.1-10.5, 12.10, 14.15, 15.23, 15.26-15.28, 16.22, 17.16, 19.13, 19.25, 20.21, 20.24, 26.8-26.9, 26.22, 26.33, 26.51, 26.69-26.75, 27.59-27.61, 28.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.1. He called to himself his twelve disciples, and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to heal every disease and every sickness. 10.2. Now the names of the twelve apostles are these. The first, Simon, who is called Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the son of Zebedee; John, his brother; 10.3. Philip; Bartholomew; Thomas; Matthew the tax collector; James the son of Alphaeus; and Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus; 10.4. Simon the Canaanite; and Judas Iscariot, who also betrayed him. 10.5. Jesus sent these twelve out, and charged them, saying, "Don't go among the Gentiles, and don't enter into any city of the Samaritans. 12.10. And behold there was a man with a withered hand. They asked him, "Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath day?" that they might accuse him. 14.15. When evening had come, his disciples came to him, saying, "This place is deserted, and the hour is already late. Send the multitudes away, that they may go into the villages, and buy themselves food. 15.23. But he answered her not a word. His disciples came and begged him, saying, "Send her away; for she cries after us. 15.26. But he answered, "It is not appropriate to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs. 15.27. But she said, "Yes, Lord, but even the dogs eat the crumbs which fall from their masters' table. 15.28. Then Jesus answered her, "Woman, great is your faith! Be it done to you even as you desire." And her daughter was healed from that hour. 16.22. Peter took him aside, and began to rebuke him, saying, "Far be it from you, Lord! This will never be done to you. 17.16. So I brought him to your disciples, and they could not cure him. 19.13. Then little children were brought to him, that he should lay his hands on them and pray; and the disciples rebuked them. 19.25. When the disciples heard it, they were exceedingly astonished, saying, "Who then can be saved? 20.21. He said to her, "What do you want?"She said to him, "Command that these, my two sons, may sit, one on your right hand, and one on your left hand, in your kingdom. 20.24. When the ten heard it, they were indigt with the two brothers. 26.8. But when his disciples saw this, they were indigt, saying, "Why this waste? 26.9. For this ointment might have been sold for much, and given to the poor. 26.22. They were exceedingly sorrowful, and each began to ask him, "It isn't me, is it, Lord? 26.33. But Peter answered him, "Even if all will be made to stumble because of you, I will never be made to stumble. 26.51. Behold, one of those who were with Jesus stretched out his hand, and drew his sword, and struck the servant of the high priest, and struck off his ear. 26.69. Now Peter was sitting outside in the court, and a maid came to him, saying, "You were also with Jesus, the Galilean! 26.70. But he denied it before them all, saying, "I don't know what you are talking about. 26.71. When he had gone out onto the porch, someone else saw him, and said to those who were there, "This man also was with Jesus of Nazareth. 26.72. Again he denied it with an oath, "I don't know the man. 26.73. After a little while those who stood by came and said to Peter, "Surely you are also one of them, for your speech makes you known. 26.74. Then he began to curse and to swear, "I don't know the man!"Immediately the cock crowed. 26.75. Peter remembered the word which Jesus had said to him, "Before the cock crows, you will deny me three times." He went out and wept bitterly. 27.59. Joseph took the body, and wrapped it in a clean linen cloth 27.60. and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn out in the rock, and he rolled a great stone to the door of the tomb, and departed. 27.61. Mary Magdalene was there, and the other Mary, sitting opposite the tomb. 28.1. Now after the Sabbath, as it began to dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to see the tomb.
13. Tosefta, Pesahim, 7.14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Babylonian Talmud, Yevamot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

47b. לא רוב טובה ולא רוב פורענות ואין מרבין עליו ואין מדקדקין עליו,קיבל מלין אותו מיד נשתיירו בו ציצין המעכבין את המילה חוזרים ומלין אותו שניה נתרפא מטבילין אותו מיד ושני ת"ח עומדים על גביו ומודיעין אותו מקצת מצות קלות ומקצת מצות חמורות טבל ועלה הרי הוא כישראל לכל דבריו,אשה נשים מושיבות אותה במים עד צוארה ושני ת"ח עומדים לה מבחוץ ומודיעין אותה מקצת מצות קלות ומקצת מצות חמורות,אחד גר ואחד עבד משוחרר ובמקום שנדה טובלת שם גר ועבד משוחרר טובלין וכל דבר שחוצץ בטבילה חוצץ בגר ובעבד משוחרר ובנדה,אמר מר גר שבא להתגייר אומרים לו מה ראית שבאת להתגייר ומודיעים אותו מקצת מצות קלות ומקצת מצות חמורות מ"ט דאי פריש נפרוש דא"ר חלבו קשים גרים לישראל כספחת דכתיב (ישעיהו יד, א) ונלוה הגר עליהם ונספחו על בית יעקב:,ומודיעים אותו עון לקט שכחה ופאה ומעשר עני: מ"ט א"ר חייא בר אבא א"ר יוחנן בן נח נהרג על פחות משוה פרוטה ולא ניתן להשבון,(ומודיעים אותו עון שכחה ופאה): ואין מרבים עליו ואין מדקדקים עליו: אמר רבי אלעזר מאי קראה דכתיב (רות א, יח) ותרא כי מתאמצת היא ללכת אתה ותחדל לדבר אליה,אמרה לה אסיר לן תחום שבת (רות א, טז) באשר תלכי אלך אסיר לן יחוד (רות א, טז) באשר תליני אלין,מפקדינן שש מאות וי"ג מצות (רות א, טז) עמך עמי אסיר לן עבודת כוכבים (רות א, טז) ואלהיך אלהי ארבע מיתות נמסרו לב"ד (רות א, יז) באשר תמותי אמות ב' קברים נמסרו לב"ד (רות א, יז) ושם אקבר,מיד ותרא כי מתאמצת היא וגו':,קיבל מלין אותו מיד: מ"ט שהויי מצוה לא משהינן:,נשתיירו בו ציצין המעכבין המילה וכו': כדתנן אלו הן ציצין המעכבין המילה בשר החופה את רוב העטרה ואינו אוכל בתרומה וא"ר ירמיה בר אבא אמר רב בשר החופה רוב גובהה של עטרה:,נתרפא מטבילין אותו מיד: נתרפא אין לא נתרפא לא מאי טעמא משום דמיא מרזו מכה:,ושני ת"ח עומדים על גביו: והא א"ר חייא א"ר יוחנן גר צריך שלשה הא א"ר יוחנן לתנא תני שלשה:,טבל ועלה הרי הוא כישראל לכל דבריו: למאי הלכתא דאי הדר ביה ומקדש בת ישראל ישראל מומר קרינא ביה וקידושיו קידושין:,אחד גר ואחד עבד משוחרר: קסלקא דעתך לקבל עליו עול מצות ורמינהו במה דברים אמורים בגר אבל בעבד משוחרר אין צריך לקבל,אמר רב ששת לא קשיא הא ר"ש בן אלעזר הא רבנן,דתניא (דברים כא, יג) ובכתה את אביה ואת אמה וגו' בד"א שלא קבלה עליה אבל קבלה עליה מטבילה ומותר בה מיד,ר"ש בן אלעזר אומר אע"פ שלא קבלה עליה כופה ומטבילה לשם שפחות וחוזר ומטבילה לשם שחרור ומשחררה 47b. they are bnotable to receive either ban abundance of good nor an abundance of calamities,since the primary place for reward and punishment is in the World-to-Come. bAnd they do not overwhelm himwith threats, band they are not exacting with himabout the details of the mitzvot.,If bhe acceptsupon himself all of these ramifications, then bthey circumcise him immediately.If btherestill bremain on him shredsof flesh from the foreskin bthat invalidate the circumcision, they circumcise him again a secondtime to remove them. When bhe is healedfrom the circumcision, bthey immerse him immediately, and two Torah scholars stand over himat the time of his immersion band inform him of some of the lenient mitzvot and some of the stringent mitzvot.Once bhe has immersed and emerged, he is likea born bJew in every sense. /b,For the immersion of ba woman: Womenappointed by the court bseat her in the waterof the ritual bath bup to her neck, and two Torah scholars stand outsidethe bath house so as not to compromise her modesty, bandfrom there bthey inform her of some of the lenient mitzvot and some of the stringent mitzvot. /b,The procedure applies for bboth a convert and an emancipated slavewho, upon immersion at the time of his emancipation, becomes a Jew in every sense. bAnd in the same place that a menstruating woman immerses,i.e., in a ritual bath of forty ise’aof water, bthere a convert and an emancipated slave also immerse. And anything that interposesbetween one’s body and the water of the ritual bath bwith regard to immersionof a ritually impure person, in a manner that would invalidate the immersion, also binterposesand invalidates the immersion bfor a convert, and for an emancipated slave, and for a menstruating woman. /b,The Gemara analyzes the ibaraita /i. bThe Master saidin the ibaraita /i: With regard to a potential bconvert who comes toa court in order to bconvert,the judges of the court bsay to him: What did you see thatmotivated byouto bcome to convert? And they inform himof bsome of the lenient mitzvot and some of the stringent mitzvot.The Gemara asks: bWhat is the reasonto say this to him? It is so bthat if heis going to bwithdrawfrom the conversion process, blet him withdrawalready at this stage. He should not be convinced to continue, bas Rabbi Ḥelbo said: Converts are as harmful to the Jewish people as aleprous bscab [ isappaḥat /i]on the skin, bas it is written: “And the convert shall join himself with them, and they shall cleave [ ivenispeḥu /i] to the house of Jacob”(Isaiah 14:1). This alludes to the fact that the cleaving of the convert to the Jewish people is like a scab.,The ibaraitacontinues: bAnd they inform himof bthe sinof neglecting the mitzva to allow the poor to take bgleanings, forgotten sheaves, andproduce in the bcornerof one’s field, bandabout the bpoor man’s tithe.The Gemara asks: bWhat is the reasonto specifically mention these mitzvot? bRabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba saidthat bRabbi Yoḥa said:Because ba gentile is executedeven bon account ofstealing bless than the value of a iperuta /i,since gentiles are particular about even such a small loss, bandan item that a gentile steals bis not subject to being returned,i.e., he is not obligated to return it to its owner. Since gentiles are unwilling to separate even from items of little value, a potential convert must be made aware that he if converts, he will be required to relinquish some of his property to others.,The ibaraitacontinues: bAnd they inform himof bthe sinof neglecting the mitzva to allow the poor to take bgleanings, forgotten sheaves, andproduce in the bcornerof one’s field. bAnd they do not overwhelm himwith threats, band they are not exacting with himabout the details of the mitzvot, i.e., the court should not overly dissuade the convert from converting. bRabbi Elazar said: What is the versefrom which this ruling is derived? bAs it is written: “And when she saw that she was steadfastly minded to go with her, she left off speaking with her”(Ruth 1:18). When Naomi set out to return to Eretz Yisrael, Ruth insisted on joining her. The Gemara understands this to mean that Ruth wished to convert. Naomi attempted to dissuade her, but Ruth persisted. The verse states that once Naomi saw Ruth’s resolve to convert, she desisted from her attempts to dissuade her. The Gemara infers from here that the same approach should be taken by a court in all cases of conversion.,The Gemara reconstructs the original dialogue in which Naomi attempted to dissuade Ruth from converting: Naomi bsaid to her:On Shabbat, bit is prohibited for usto go beyond bthe Shabbat limit.Ruth responded: b“Where you go, I shall go”(Ruth 1:16), and no further. Naomi said to her: bIt is forbidden for us to be alone togetherwith a man with whom it is forbidden to engage in relations. Ruth responded: b“Where you lodge, I shall lodge”(Ruth 1:16), and in the same manner.,Naomi said to her: bWe are commandedto observe bsix hundred and thirteen mitzvot.Ruth responded: b“Your people are my people”(Ruth 1:16). Naomi said to her: bIdolatrous worship is forbidden to us.Ruth responded: b“Your God is my God”(Ruth 1:16). Naomi said to her: bFour types of capital punishment were handed over to a courtwith which to punish those who transgress the mitzvot. Ruth responded: b“Where you die, I shall die”(Ruth 1:17). Naomi said to her: bTwo burial grounds were handed over to the court,one for those executed for more severe crimes and another for those executed for less severe crimes. Ruth responded: b“And there I shall be buried”(Ruth 1:17)., bImmediatelyfollowing this dialogue, the verse states: b“And when she saw that she was steadfastly mindedshe left off speaking with her” (Ruth 1:18). Once Naomi saw Ruth’s resolve to convert, she desisted from her attempts to dissuade her.,The ibaraitacontinues: If bhe acceptsupon himself all of these ramifications, then bthey circumcise him immediately.The Gemara asks: bWhat is the reasonto act immediately? It is that bwe do not delaythe performance of ba mitzva. /b,The ibaraitacontinues: If btherestill bremain on him shredsof flesh from the foreskin bthat invalidate the circumcision,he is circumcised a second time to remove them. The Gemara explains: This is bas we learnedin a mishna ( iShabbat137a): bThese are the shredsof flesh bthat invalidate the circumcisionif they are not cut: Any fragments of bthe flesh that cover the greater part of the corona.If such shreds remain, the child is considered uncircumcised, band he may not partake of iteruma /i. Andin explanation of this mishna, bRav Yirmeya bar Abba saidthat bRav said:This also includes bthe flesh that covers the greater part of the height of the corona. /b,The ibaraitacontinues: When bhe is healedfrom the circumcision, bthey immerse him immediately.The Gemara infers from the precise formulation of the ibaraitathat when bhe has healed,then byes,he is immersed, but as long as bhe has not healed,then bno,he is not. bWhat is the reasonfor this? It is bbecause water agitates a wound. /b,The ibaraitacontinues: bAnd two Torah scholars stand over himat the time of his immersion. The Gemara asks: bBut didn’t Rabbi Ḥiyya saythat bRabbi Yoḥa saidthat ba convert requiresa court of bthreeto be present at his conversion? The Gemara answers: In fact, bRabbi Yoḥa said to the itanna /ireciting the mishna: Do not teach that there are two Torah scholars; rather, bteachthat there are bthree. /b,The ibaraitacontinues: Once bhe has immersed and emerged he is a Jew in every sense.The Gemara asks: bWith regard to what ihalakha /iis this said? It is bthat if he reverts backto behaving as a gentile, he nevertheless remains Jewish, bandso if bhe betroths a Jewish woman,although bhe is considered to be an apostate Jew, his betrothal isa valid bbetrothal. /b,The ibaraitacontinues: This applies bboth for a convert and for an emancipated slave.The Gemara considers the meaning of this clause: If bit enters your mindto interpret the ibaraitato mean that a convert and an emancipated slave are the same bwith regard to accepting upon oneself the yoke of mitzvot,then one could braise a contradictionfrom that which is taught in another ibaraita /i: bIn whatcase bis this statementthat there is a need to accept the yoke of mitzvot bsaid?It is bwith respect to a convert; however, an emancipated slave does not need to acceptupon himself the yoke of mitzvot when he immerses for the sake of emancipation. Rather, the immersion alone is sufficient to emancipate him and thereby render him a Jew., bRav Sheshet said:This is bnot difficult,as bthis ibaraitathat states that an emancipated slave is not required to accept the yoke of mitzvot bisin accordance with the opinion of bRabbi Shimon ben Elazar,whereas bthat ibaraitathat implies he is required to do so bisin accordance with the opinion of bthe Rabbis,the first itannaof the following ibaraita /i., bAs it is taughtin a ibaraita /i: The Torah permits a Jewish soldier to take a beautiful female prisoner of war out of her captivity in order to marry her. Before he may do so, she must first undergo the process that the Torah describes: “And she shall shave her head, and do her nails; and she shall remove the raiment of her captivity from upon her, and she shall remain in your house band bewail her father and her mothera month of days” (Deuteronomy 21:12–13). She may then be immersed for the sake of conversion, even though she does not accept upon herself the yoke of mitzvot. At that point it is permitted to marry her. The ibaraitaasks: bUnder whatcircumstance bare these matters stated?It is bwhen she did not accept upon herselfthe yoke of mitzvot; bhowever,if bshewillingly baccepted upon herselfthe yoke of mitzvot, bhe may immerse herfor the sake of conversion, band he is permitted tomarry bher immediatelywithout the need for her to undergo the process described in the Torah., bRabbi Shimon ben Elazar says: Even if she did not accept upon herselfthe yoke of mitzvot, the need for the process can still be circumvented if bhe forcesher band immerses her for the sake of slavery, and then he again immerses her for the sake of emancipation andthereby bemancipates her,rendering her a Jewess. Rabbi Shimon ben Elazar holds that the immersion of a slave for the sake of emancipation is effective even if the slave does not accept upon himself the yoke of mitzvot.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts, canonical Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
aramaic Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
berenice Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
biblical interpretation Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
blind/blinding/blindness Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
body (as detached from the soul) Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
caesarea (by the sea) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
cebes, disciple of socrates Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
cilicia (also province) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
d/demonisation Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
death Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
disciple, of jesus Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
echecrates Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
emic and etic perspectives Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
exemplars of trust, jesus as Morgan, The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust' (2022) 271
festivals Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
gentile christians Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 70
gentiles, wanting to join in the celebration of passover' Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 340
geography\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
gospel of john, johannine epistemology Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
gospel of john, johannine spirituality Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
gospel of john, johannine travel Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
gospel of luke\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
grace Morgan, The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust' (2022) 271, 272
greece, greek Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
greeks (ancient) Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
grief / grieving Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
heal/healers/healings Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
heaven\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
hierapolis, tomb of philip Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
incarnation/incarnate Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
jerome Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
jerusalem\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
jesus, work/acts/miracles of Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
jesus christ, worship of Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
jewish christians Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 70
jews, jewish Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 70
jews Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
johannine Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
john Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
john (gospel) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
journey, earthly journey Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
journey, heavenly journey Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
journey, spiritual journey Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
judaea\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
kephalaion (kephalaia) Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
king Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
knowledge, divine Morgan, The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust' (2022) 271
mediator, others, in imitation of christ Morgan, The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust' (2022) 271, 272
messiah Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
messianism, messianic Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
miracles/miraculous/miracle-workers Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
moral transformation Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
moses Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
origen Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
pagan / pagans / pagan religion, greeks Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
palestine Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
paratextual Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
paul Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 70
paula Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
phaedo Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
pharisees Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
philip (apostle) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
philip (evangelist) Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
pilgrims Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
place, holy places Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
polemon ii Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
polemon of cilicia Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
pontus Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194
proselytes Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 70
revelation\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
sabbath Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
samaritan woman Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
sanctuary\u2002 Luther Hartog and Wilde, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Travel Experiences: 3rd century BCE – 8th century CE (2024) 146
sebomenoi Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 70
simmias, disciple of socrates Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
soul, immortality of Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
soul Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
spiritual activity Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
temples, of herod Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
titlos (titloi) Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
translation Novenson, Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity (2020) 200
wonders/wonder-working Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman, Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity (2019) 177
worship, in spirit and truth Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
worship, true Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
worship Petersen and van Kooten, Religio-Philosophical Discourses in the Mediterranean World: From Plato, through Jesus, to Late Antiquity (2017) 235
zenon of laodicea Huttner, Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley (2013) 194