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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8243
New Testament, Acts, 5.33


οἱ δὲ ἀκούσαντες διεπρίοντο καὶ ἐβούλοντο ἀνελεῖν αὐτούς.But they, when they heard this, were cut to the heart, and determined to kill them.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 2.1-2.2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.1. וְעַתָּה מְלָכִים הַשְׂכִּילוּ הִוָּסְרוּ שֹׁפְטֵי אָרֶץ׃ 2.1. לָמָּה רָגְשׁוּ גוֹיִם וּלְאֻמִּים יֶהְגּוּ־רִיק׃ 2.2. יִתְיַצְּבוּ מַלְכֵי־אֶרֶץ וְרוֹזְנִים נוֹסְדוּ־יָחַד עַל־יְהוָה וְעַל־מְשִׁיחוֹ׃ 2.1. Why are the nations in an uproar? And why do the peoples mutter in vain?" 2.2. The kings of the earth stand up, And the rulers take counsel together, Against the LORD, and against His anointed:"
2. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 16.2, 20.4 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16.2. בֶּן־אָדָם הוֹדַע אֶת־יְרוּשָׁלִַם אֶת־תּוֹעֲבֹתֶיהָ׃ 16.2. וַתִּקְחִי אֶת־בָּנַיִךְ וְאֶת־בְּנוֹתַיִךְ אֲשֶׁר יָלַדְתְּ לִי וַתִּזְבָּחִים לָהֶם לֶאֱכוֹל הַמְעַט מתזנתך [מִתַּזְנוּתָיִךְ׃] 20.4. כִּי בְהַר־קָדְשִׁי בְּהַר מְרוֹם יִשְׂרָאֵל נְאֻם אֲדֹנָי יְהוִה שָׁם יַעַבְדֻנִי כָּל־בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל כֻּלֹּה בָּאָרֶץ שָׁם אֶרְצֵם וְשָׁם אֶדְרוֹשׁ אֶת־תְּרוּמֹתֵיכֶם וְאֶת־רֵאשִׁית מַשְׂאוֹתֵיכֶם בְּכָל־קָדְשֵׁיכֶם׃ 20.4. הֲתִשְׁפֹּט אֹתָם הֲתִשְׁפּוֹט בֶּן־אָדָם אֶת־תּוֹעֲבֹת אֲבוֹתָם הוֹדִיעֵם׃ 16.2. ’Son of man, cause Jerusalem to know her abominations," 20.4. Wilt thou judge them, son of man, wilt thou judge them? cause them to know the abominations of their fathers;"
3. Hebrew Bible, 2 Chronicles, 24.19 (5th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

24.19. וַיִּשְׁלַח בָּהֶם נְבִאִים לַהֲשִׁיבָם אֶל־יְהוָה וַיָּעִידוּ בָם וְלֹא הֶאֱזִינוּ׃ 24.19. Yet He sent prophets to them, to bring them back unto the LORD; and they admonished them, but they would not give ear."
4. Hebrew Bible, Nehemiah, 9.26 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9.26. וַיַּמְרוּ וַיִּמְרְדוּ בָּךְ וַיַּשְׁלִכוּ אֶת־תּוֹרָתְךָ אַחֲרֵי גַוָּם וְאֶת־נְבִיאֶיךָ הָרָגוּ אֲשֶׁר־הֵעִידוּ בָם לַהֲשִׁיבָם אֵלֶיךָ וַיַּעֲשׂוּ נֶאָצוֹת גְּדוֹלֹת׃ 9.26. Nevertheless they were disobedient, and rebelled against Thee, and cast Thy law behind their back, and slew Thy prophets that did forewarn them to turn them back unto Thee, and they wrought great provocations."
5. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 14.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

14.5. But he found an opportunity that furthered his mad purpose when he was invited by Demetrius to a meeting of the council and was asked about the disposition and intentions of the Jews. He answered:
6. Anon., Didache, 10.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 12.103, 13.357-13.364, 14.163-14.184, 20.197-20.203, 20.216 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.103. Accordingly, when three days were over, Demetrius took them, and went over the causeway seven furlongs long: it was a bank in the sea to an island. And when they had gone over the bridge, he proceeded to the northern parts, and showed them where they should meet, which was in a house that was built near the shore, and was a quiet place, and fit for their discoursing together about their work. 13.357. Yet did not this misfortune terrify Alexander; but he made an expedition upon the maritime parts of the country, Raphia and Anthedon, (the name of which king Herod afterwards changed to Agrippias,) and took even that by force. 13.358. But when Alexander saw that Ptolemy was retired from Gaza to Cyprus, and his mother Cleopatra was returned to Egypt, he grew angry at the people of Gaza, because they had invited Ptolemy to assist them, and besieged their city, and ravaged their country. 13.359. But as Apollodotus, the general of the army of Gaza, fell upon the camp of the Jews by night, with two thousand foreign and ten thousand of his own forces, while the night lasted, those of Gaza prevailed, because the enemy was made to believe that it was Ptolemy who attacked them; but when day was come on, and that mistake was corrected, and the Jews knew the truth of the matter, they came back again, and fell upon those of Gaza, and slew of them about a thousand. 13.361. but it happened that before he came Apollodotus was slain; for his brother Lysimachus envying him for the great reputation he had gained among the citizens, slew him, and got the army together, and delivered up the city to Alexander 13.362. who, when he came in at first, lay quiet, but afterward set his army upon the inhabitants of Gaza, and gave them leave to punish them; so some went one way, and some went another, and slew the inhabitants of Gaza; yet were not they of cowardly hearts, but opposed those that came to slay them, and slew as many of the Jews; 13.363. and some of them, when they saw themselves deserted, burnt their own houses, that the enemy might get none of their spoils; nay, some of them, with their own hands, slew their children and their wives, having no other way but this of avoiding slavery for them; 13.364. but the senators, who were in all five hundred, fled to Apollo’s temple, (for this attack happened to be made as they were sitting,) whom Alexander slew; and when he had utterly overthrown their city, he returned to Jerusalem, having spent a year in that siege. 14.163. 3. But now the principal men among the Jews, when they saw Antipater and his sons to grow so much in the good-will the nation bare to them, and in the revenues which they received out of Judea, and out of Hyrcanus’s own wealth, they became ill-disposed to him; 14.164. for indeed Antipater had contracted a friendship with the Roman emperors; and when he had prevailed with Hyrcanus to send them money, he took it to himself, and purloined the present intended, and sent it as if it were his own, and not Hyrcanus’s gift to them. 14.165. Hyrcanus heard of this his management, but took no care about it; nay, he rather was very glad of it. But the chief men of the Jews were therefore in fear, because they saw that Herod was a violent and bold man, and very desirous of acting tyrannically; so they came to Hyrcanus, and now accused Antipater openly, and said to him, “How long wilt thou be quiet under such actions as are now done? Or dost thou not see that Antipater and his sons have already seized upon the government, and that it is only the name of a king which is given thee? 14.166. But do not thou suffer these things to be hidden from thee, nor do thou think to escape danger by being so careless of thyself and of thy kingdom; for Antipater and his sons are not now stewards of thine affairs: do not thou deceive thyself with such a notion; they are evidently absolute lords; 14.167. for Herod, Antipater’s son, hath slain Hezekiah, and those that were with him, and hath thereby transgressed our law, which hath forbidden to slay any man, even though he were a wicked man, unless he had been first condemned to suffer death by the Sanhedrim yet hath he been so insolent as to do this, and that without any authority from thee.” 14.168. 4. Upon Hyrcanus hearing this, he complied with them. The mothers also of those that had been slain by Herod raised his indignation; for those women continued every day in the temple, persuading the king and the people that Herod might undergo a trial before the Sanhedrim for what he had done. 14.169. Hyrcanus was so moved by these complaints, that he summoned Herod to come to his trial for what was charged upon him. Accordingly he came; but his father had persuaded him to come not like a private man, but with a guard, for the security of his person; and that when he had settled the affairs of Galilee in the best manner he could for his own advantage, he should come to his trial, but still with a body of men sufficient for his security on his journey, yet so that he should not come with so great a force as might look like terrifying Hyrcanus, but still such a one as might not expose him naked and unguarded [to his enemies.] 14.171. But when Herod stood before the Sanhedrim, with his body of men about him, he affrighted them all, and no one of his former accusers durst after that bring any charge against him, but there was a deep silence, and nobody knew what was to be done. 14.172. When affairs stood thus, one whose name was Sameas, a righteous man he was, and for that reason above all fear, rose up, and said, “O you that are assessors with me, and O thou that art our king, I neither have ever myself known such a case, nor do I suppose that any one of you can name its parallel, that one who is called to take his trial by us ever stood in such a manner before us; but every one, whosoever he be, that comes to be tried by this Sanhedrim, presents himself in a submissive manner, and like one that is in fear of himself, and that endeavors to move us to compassion, with his hair dishevelled, and in a black and mourning garment: 14.173. but this admirable man Herod, who is accused of murder, and called to answer so heavy an accusation, stands here clothed in purple, and with the hair of his head finely trimmed, and with his armed men about him, that if we shall condemn him by our law, he may slay us, and by overbearing justice may himself escape death. 14.174. Yet do not I make this complaint against Herod himself; he is to be sure more concerned for himself than for the laws; but my complaint is against yourselves, and your king, who gave him a license so to do. However, take you notice, that God is great, and that this very man, whom you are going to absolve and dismiss, for the sake of Hyrcanus, will one day punish both you and your king himself also.” 14.175. Nor did Sameas mistake in any part of this prediction; for when Herod had received the kingdom, he slew all the members of this Sanhedrim, and Hyrcanus himself also, excepting Sameas 14.176. for he had a great honor for him on account of his righteousness, and because, when the city was afterward besieged by Herod and Sosius, he persuaded the people to admit Herod into it; and told them that for their sins they would not be able to escape his hands:—which things will be related by us in their proper places. 14.177. 5. But when Hyrcanus saw that the members of the Sanhedrim were ready to pronounce the sentence of death upon Herod, he put off the trial to another day, and sent privately to Herod, and advised him to fly out of the city, for that by this means he might escape. 14.178. So he retired to Damascus, as though he fled from the king; and when he had been with Sextus Caesar, and had put his own affairs in a sure posture, he resolved to do thus; that in case he were again summoned before the Sanhedrim to take his trial, he would not obey that summons. 14.179. Hereupon the members of the Sanhedrim had great indignation at this posture of affairs, and endeavored to persuade Hyrcanus that all these things were against him; which state of matters he was not ignorant of; but his temper was so unmanly, and so foolish, that he was able to do nothing at all. 14.181. but his father Antipater, and his brother [Phasaelus], met him, and hindered him from assaulting Jerusalem. They also pacified his vehement temper, and persuaded him to do no overt action, but only to affright them with threatenings, and to proceed no further against one who had given him the dignity he had: 14.182. they also desired him not only to be angry that he was summoned, and obliged to come to his trial, but to remember withal how he was dismissed without condemnation, and how he ought to give Hyrcanus thanks for the same; and that he was not to regard only what was disagreeable to him, and be unthankful for his deliverance. 14.183. So they desired him to consider, that since it is God that turns the scales of war, there is great uncertainty in the issue of battles, and that therefore he ought of to expect the victory when he should fight with his king, and him that had supported him, and bestowed many benefits upon him, and had done nothing of itself very severe to him; for that his accusation, which was derived from evil counselors, and not from himself, had rather the suspicion of some severity, than any thing really severe in it. 14.184. Herod was persuaded by these arguments, and believed that it was sufficient for his future hopes to have made a show of his strength before the nation, and done no more to it—and in this state were the affairs of Judea at this time. 20.197. 1. And now Caesar, upon hearing the death of Festus, sent Albinus into Judea, as procurator. But the king deprived Joseph of the high priesthood, and bestowed the succession to that dignity on the son of Aus, who was also himself called Aus. 20.198. Now the report goes that this eldest Aus proved a most fortunate man; for he had five sons who had all performed the office of a high priest to God, and who had himself enjoyed that dignity a long time formerly, which had never happened to any other of our high priests. 20.199. But this younger Aus, who, as we have told you already, took the high priesthood, was a bold man in his temper, and very insolent; he was also of the sect of the Sadducees, who are very rigid in judging offenders, above all the rest of the Jews, as we have already observed; 20.201. but as for those who seemed the most equitable of the citizens, and such as were the most uneasy at the breach of the laws, they disliked what was done; they also sent to the king [Agrippa], desiring him to send to Aus that he should act so no more, for that what he had already done was not to be justified; 20.202. nay, some of them went also to meet Albinus, as he was upon his journey from Alexandria, and informed him that it was not lawful for Aus to assemble a sanhedrim without his consent. 20.203. Whereupon Albinus complied with what they said, and wrote in anger to Aus, and threatened that he would bring him to punishment for what he had done; on which king Agrippa took the high priesthood from him, when he had ruled but three months, and made Jesus, the son of Damneus, high priest. 20.216. 6. Now as many of the Levites, which is a tribe of ours, as were singers of hymns, persuaded the king to assemble a sanhedrim, and to give them leave to wear linen garments, as well as the priests for they said that this would be a work worthy the times of his government, that he might have a memorial of such a novelty, as being his doing.
8. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.208-1.211, 1.537 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.208. 6. However, he found it impossible to escape envy in such his prosperity; for the glory of these young men affected even Hyrcanus himself already privately, though he said nothing of it to anybody; but what he principally was grieved at was the great actions of Herod, and that so many messengers came one before another, and informed him of the great reputation he got in all his undertakings. There were also many people in the royal palace itself who inflamed his envy at him; those, I mean, who were obstructed in their designs by the prudence either of the young men, or of Antipater. 1.209. These men said, that by committing the public affairs to the management of Antipater and of his sons, he sat down with nothing but the bare name of a king, without any of its authority; and they asked him how long he would so far mistake himself, as to breed up kings against his own interest; for that they did not now conceal their government of affairs any longer, but were plainly lords of the nation, and had thrust him out of his authority; that this was the case when Herod slew so many men without his giving him any command to do it, either by word of mouth, or by his letter, and this in contradiction to the law of the Jews; who therefore, in case he be not a king, but a private man, still ought to come to his trial, and answer it to him, and to the laws of his country, which do not permit anyone to be killed till he had been condemned in judgment. 1.211. However, Sextus Caesar was in fear for the young man, lest he should be taken by his enemies, and brought to punishment; so he sent some to denounce expressly to Hyrcanus that he should acquit Herod of the capital charge against him; who acquitted him accordingly, as being otherwise inclined also so to do, for he loved Herod. 1.537. o he wrote back to him, and appointed him to have the power over his sons; but said withal, that he would do well to make an examination into this matter of the plot against him in a public court, and to take for his assessors his own kindred, and the governors of the province. And if those sons be found guilty, to put them to death; but if they appear to have thought of no more than flying away from him, that he should moderate their punishment.
9. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15.9, 15.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.9. For I am the least of theapostles, who is not worthy to be called an apostle, because Ipersecuted the assembly of God. 15.23. Buteach in his own order: Christ the first fruits, then those who areChrist's, at his coming.
10. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 11.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. New Testament, Acts, 1, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 1.10, 1.11, 1.12, 1.13, 1.14, 1.26, 2, 2.5, 2.14, 2.15, 2.16, 2.17, 2.18, 2.19, 2.20, 2.21, 2.22, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26, 2.27, 2.28, 2.29, 2.30, 2.31, 2.32, 2.33, 2.34, 2.35, 2.36, 2.37, 2.38, 2.39, 2.40, 2.41, 2.44, 2.46, 3, 3.1, 3.6, 3.12, 3.16, 4, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 4.9, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.13, 4.14, 4.15, 4.16, 4.17, 4.18, 4.19, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22, 4.23, 4.24, 4.25, 4.26, 4.27, 4.28, 4.29, 4.30, 4.31, 4.32-5.11, 5, 5.10, 5.11, 5.12, 5.13, 5.14, 5.15, 5.16, 5.17, 5.18, 5.19, 5.20, 5.21, 5.22, 5.23, 5.24, 5.25, 5.26, 5.27, 5.28, 5.29, 5.30, 5.31, 5.32, 5.34, 5.35, 5.36, 5.37, 5.38, 5.39, 5.40, 5.41, 5.42, 6, 6.9, 7, 7.51, 7.52, 7.53, 7.58, 7.59, 7.60, 8, 8.1, 8.12, 9, 9.14, 9.21, 9.23, 9.24, 9.29, 10, 10.36, 10.38, 10.39, 10.40, 10.41, 10.43, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.6, 12.7, 12.8, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.12, 12.13, 12.14, 12.15, 12.16, 12.17, 13.27, 13.28, 13.30, 13.31, 13.39, 13.48, 14.2, 14.3, 14.4, 14.19, 17.5, 17.13, 17.20, 17.30, 17.31, 17.34, 20.2, 20.3, 20.17, 20.18, 20.19, 20.20, 20.21, 20.22, 20.23, 20.24, 20.25, 20.26, 20.27, 20.28, 20.29, 20.30, 20.31, 20.32, 20.33, 20.34, 20.35, 20.36, 20.37, 20.38, 21.10, 21.11, 21.12, 21.13, 21.14, 21.27, 21.28, 21.29, 21.30, 21.31, 22, 22.16, 22.17, 22.18, 22.19, 22.20, 22.21, 22.22, 23, 23.12, 23.14, 23.21, 25.11, 26.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. New Testament, Galatians, 1.13, 1.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.13. For you have heard of my way ofliving in time past in the Jews' religion, how that beyond measure Ipersecuted the assembly of God, and ravaged it. 1.23. but they only heard: "He who once persecuted us nowpreaches the faith that he once tried to destroy.
13. New Testament, Philippians, 3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.6. concerning zeal, persecuting the assembly; concerning the righteousness which is in the law, found blameless.
14. New Testament, John, 11.47 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11.47. The chief priests therefore and the Pharisees gathered a council, and said, "What are we doing? For this man does many signs.
15. New Testament, Luke, 13.33, 16.29, 16.31, 18.32, 20.37, 22.66, 23.12, 24.13-24.15, 24.25-24.27, 24.32, 24.44-24.46 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13.33. Nevertheless I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the next day, for it can't be that a prophet perish outside of Jerusalem.' 16.29. But Abraham said to him, 'They have Moses and the prophets. Let them listen to them.' 16.31. He said to him, 'If they don't listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded if one rises from the dead.' 18.32. For he will be delivered up to the Gentiles, will be mocked, treated shamefully, and spit on. 20.37. But that the dead are raised, even Moses showed at the bush, when he called the Lord 'The God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.' 22.66. As soon as it was day, the assembly of the elders of the people was gathered together, both chief priests and scribes, and they led him away into their council, saying 23.12. Herod and Pilate became friends with each other that very day, for before that they were enemies with each other. 24.13. Behold, two of them were going that very day to a village named Emmaus, which was sixty stadia from Jerusalem. 24.14. They talked with each other about all of these things which had happened. 24.15. It happened, while they talked and questioned together, that Jesus himself came near, and went with them. 24.25. He said to them, "Foolish men, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken! 24.26. Didn't the Christ have to suffer these things and to enter into his glory? 24.27. Beginning from Moses and from all the prophets, he explained to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself. 24.32. They said one to another, "Weren't our hearts burning within us, while he spoke to us along the way, and while he opened the Scriptures to us? 24.44. He said to them, "This is what I told you, while I was still with you, that all things which are written in the law of Moses, the prophets, and the psalms, concerning me must be fulfilled. 24.45. Then he opened their minds, that they might understand the Scriptures. 24.46. He said to them, "Thus it is written, and thus it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead the third day
16. New Testament, Mark, 10.33, 14.55, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.33. Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem. The Son of Man will be delivered to the chief priests and the scribes. They will condemn him to death, and will deliver him to the Gentiles. 14.55. Now the chief priests and the whole council sought witnesses against Jesus to put him to death, and found none. 15.1. Immediately in the morning the chief priests, with the elders and scribes, and the whole council, held a consultation, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered him up to Pilate.
17. New Testament, Matthew, 1.23, 18.5, 18.20, 26.59, 28.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.23. Behold, the virgin shall be with child, And shall bring forth a son. They shall call his name Immanuel;" Which is, being interpreted, "God with us. 18.5. Whoever receives one such little child in my name receives me 18.20. For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there I am in the midst of them. 26.59. Now the chief priests, the elders, and the whole council sought false testimony against Jesus, that they might put him to death; 28.20. teaching them to observe all things which I commanded you. Behold, I am with you always, even to the end of the age." Amen.
18. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 301

301. Three days later Demetrius took the men and passing along the sea-wall, seven stadia long, to the island, crossed the bridge and made for the northern districts of Pharos. There he assembled them in a house, which had been built upon the sea-shore, of great beauty and in a secluded situation, and invited them to carry out the work of translation, since everything that they needed for the purpose


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham DeJong (2022), A Prophet like Moses (Deut 18:15, 18): The Origin, History, and Influence of the Mosaic Prophetic Succession, 270
acts,anti-judaic tendency Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
acts,apostles,depiction of Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
acts,western text Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
acts and anti-judaism Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 60, 61, 63
acts and racial discourse Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
acts of the apostles Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 228
agabus Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 60
alexandria Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
alleluia psalms (jerusalem liturgy) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
antiphonal psalms Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
apostle Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
armenian lectionary Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
baptism Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79
birkat ha-minim Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
boulē Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
calendrical systems Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 139
causes of corruption,theological concerns Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
christianity,and greek/pagan religion,and judaism Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 228
christians,gentile,in the jewish temple Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 228
church of st. stephen ( martyrion of st. stephen) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
church of the holy sepulcher,holy martyrium Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
criteria in textual criticism,authors style Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
criteria in textual criticism,discourse analysis Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
cult Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79
demetrius ii Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 139
deuteronomistic theology Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 197
divine identity Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79
divine name Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79
divine plan/βουλή Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 197
doubt Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 101
easter/pascha Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
easter/paschal octave,bright tuesday Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
easter/paschal octave Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
epiphany iii Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
excommunication Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
father Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79
feast of,stephen,celebrated on 26/27 december Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
feast of,stephen,feast of,stephen,celebrated on 26 december Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
gabinius (syrian governor) Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
gamaliel (gamliel) the elder,r. Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
gamaliel (gamliel) the younger,r. Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
hanukkah,holiday of Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 139
herod,antipas Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 197
hesychius Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
identity construction,along violent jew/merciful christian binary Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
index of subjects,shammaite) Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
jerusalem Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
jesus,as prophet like moses DeJong (2022), A Prophet like Moses (Deut 18:15, 18): The Origin, History, and Influence of the Mosaic Prophetic Succession, 270
jesus,resurrection of DeJong (2022), A Prophet like Moses (Deut 18:15, 18): The Origin, History, and Influence of the Mosaic Prophetic Succession, 270
jonathan Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 139
josephus Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
julius caesar Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
lord Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79
love Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 101
marcionite thinking,on divine judgment Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 155
martyrdom fleeing from Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 63
martyrion of st. stephen Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
mishnah,and sacrifice Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 228
mount of olives (eleona) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 118
nativity Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 118
new testament,as source Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 228
opponents Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 197
paul (saul) Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
paul death of Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 60, 61, 63
paul pharisee Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
penner,todd Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 60, 61, 63
pilgrimage (pilgrim),and constantinople,and jerusalem Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
pliny the younger Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
politics,of luke/acts Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 197
priestly elites,at the jerusalem temple Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
rabbis Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
reliability Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 101
relics,translation of Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117
resurrection belief,complex basis of Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 101
sacrifice,animal,in judaism v,vi Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 228
sadducees Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
scripture DeJong (2022), A Prophet like Moses (Deut 18:15, 18): The Origin, History, and Influence of the Mosaic Prophetic Succession, 270
stephen,anti-jewish symbol,as protomartyr Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 117, 118
stephen and the hellenists Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
stephen historical existence of Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
synedrion,versus jerusalems boulē and the sanhedrin Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
tacitus Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 656
taxation' Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 116
temple Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79
temple (jewish) in jerusalem,christians and the Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 228
temple critique Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13, 155
temple worship Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 155
theudas Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 63
witness,as basis of belief or trust Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 101
yahweh,yhwh Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 79