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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8243
New Testament, Acts, 25.19


ζητήματα δέ τινα περὶ τῆς ἰδίας δεισιδαιμονίας εἶχον πρὸς αὐτὸν καὶ περί τινος Ἰησοῦ τεθνηκότος, ὃν ἔφασκεν ὁ Παῦλος ζῇν.but had certain questions against him of their own religion, and of one Jesus, who was dead, whom Paul affirmed to be alive.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Ecclesiastes, 1.9 (5th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.9. מַה־שֶּׁהָיָה הוּא שֶׁיִּהְיֶה וּמַה־שֶׁנַּעֲשָׂה הוּא שֶׁיֵּעָשֶׂה וְאֵין כָּל־חָדָשׁ תַּחַת הַשָּׁמֶשׁ׃ 1.9. That which hath been is that which shall be, And that which hath been done is that which shall be done; And there is nothing new under the sun."
2. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 3.3.58 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.3.58. While they were still out of range, Cyrus passed the watchword, Zeus our Helper and our Guide. And when the watchword came back and was delivered again to him, Cyrus himself began the usual paean, and they all devoutly joined with a loud voice in the singing, for in the performance of such service the God-fearing have less fear of men.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

42. But that we may describe the conception and the parturition of virtues, let the superstitious either stop their ears, or else let them depart; for we are about to teach those initiated persons who are worthy of the knowledge of the most sacred mysteries, the whole nature of such divine and secret ordices. And those who are thus worthy are they who, with all modesty, practise genuine piety, of that sort which scorns to disguise itself under any false colours. But we will not act the part of hierophant or expounder of sacred mysteries to those who are afflicted with the incurable disease of pride of language and quibbling expressions, and juggling tricks of manners, and who measure sanctity and holiness by no other standard. XIII. 42. I will, therefore, behave myself in an affable, and courteous, and conciliatory manner to all men, even if I should obtain the dominion over the whole earth and the whole sea, and especially to those who are in the greatest difficulties and of the least reputation, and who are destitute of all assistance from kindred of their own, to those who are orphaned of either or of both their parents, to women who have experienced widowhood, and to old men who have either never had any children at all, or who have lost at an early age those who have been born to them;
4. Mishnah, Sanhedrin, 10.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.1. All Israel have a portion in the world to come, for it says, “Your people, all of them righteous, shall possess the land for ever; They are the shoot that I planted, my handiwork in which I glory” (Isaiah 60:2. And these are the ones who have no portion in the world to come: He who maintains that resurrection is not a biblical doctrine, that the torah was not divinely revealed, and an epikoros. Rabbi Akiva says: “Even one who reads non-canonical books and one who whispers [a charm] over a wound and says, “I will not bring upon you any of the diseases whichbrought upon the Egyptians: for I the lord am you healer” (Exodus 15:26). Abba Shaul says: “Also one who pronounces the divine name as it is spelled.”"
5. New Testament, 1 Peter, 2.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.4. coming to him, a living stone, rejected indeed by men, but chosen by God, precious.
6. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15.12-15.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.12. Now if Christ is preached, that he has been raised from thedead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of thedead? 15.13. But if there is no resurrection of the dead, neither hasChrist been raised. 15.14. If Christ has not been raised, then ourpreaching is in vain, and your faith also is in vain. 15.15. Yes, weare found false witnesses of God, because we testified about God thathe raised up Christ, whom he didn't raise up, if it is so that the deadare not raised. 15.16. For if the dead aren't raised, neither hasChrist been raised. 15.17. If Christ has not been raised, your faithis vain; you are still in your sins. 15.18. Then they also who arefallen asleep in Christ have perished. 15.19. If we have only hoped inChrist in this life, we are of all men most pitiable. 15.20. But now Christ has been raised from the dead. He became thefirst fruits of those who are asleep. 15.21. For since death came byman, the resurrection of the dead also came by man. 15.22. For as inAdam all die, so also in Christ all will be made alive. 15.23. Buteach in his own order: Christ the first fruits, then those who areChrist's, at his coming. 15.24. Then the end comes, when he willdeliver up the Kingdom to God, even the Father; when he will haveabolished all rule and all authority and power.
7. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 4.14, 13.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. New Testament, Acts, 1.22, 2.24, 2.29-2.32, 3.15, 5.29-5.32, 5.38-5.39, 8.26-8.39, 9.10-9.19, 10.19-10.24, 10.39-10.41, 13.26-13.37, 16.9-16.10, 17.3, 17.18, 17.23, 17.30-17.32, 18.12-18.15, 19.21-19.41, 21.3-21.14, 22.25-22.26, 23.6, 23.19, 23.27, 23.29, 24.15-24.21, 25.6-25.14, 25.16, 25.18, 25.20-25.23, 25.25-25.26, 26.6-26.8, 26.20, 26.22-26.23, 26.30-26.32, 28.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.22. beginning from the baptism of John, to the day that he was received up from us, of these one must become a witness with us of his resurrection. 2.24. whom God raised up, having freed him from the agony of death, because it was not possible that he should be held by it. 2.29. Brothers, I may tell you freely of the patriarch David, that he both died and was buried, and his tomb is with us to this day. 2.30. Therefore, being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him that of the fruit of his body, according to the flesh, he would raise up the Christ to sit on his throne 2.31. he foreseeing this spoke about the resurrection of the Christ, that neither was his soul left in Hades, nor did his flesh see decay. 2.32. This Jesus God raised up, whereof we all are witnesses. 3.15. and killed the Prince of life, whom God raised from the dead, whereof we are witnesses. 5.29. But Peter and the apostles answered, "We must obey God rather than men. 5.30. The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom you killed, hanging him on a tree. 5.31. God exalted him with his right hand to be a Prince and a Savior, to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins. 5.32. We are His witnesses of these things; and so also is the Holy Spirit, whom God has given to those who obey him. 5.38. Now I tell you, refrain from these men, and leave them alone. For if this counsel or this work is of men, it will be overthrown. 5.39. But if it is of God, you will not be able to overthrow it, and you would be found even to be fighting against God! 8.26. But an angel of the Lord spoke to Philip, saying, "Arise, and go toward the south to the way that goes down from Jerusalem to Gaza. This is a desert. 8.27. He arose and went. Behold, there was a man of Ethiopia, a eunuch of great authority under Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, who was over all her treasure, who had come to Jerusalem to worship. 8.28. He was returning and sitting in his chariot, and was reading the prophet Isaiah. 8.29. The Spirit said to Philip, "Go near, and join yourself to this chariot. 8.30. Philip ran to him, and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet, and said, "Do you understand what you are reading? 8.31. He said, "How can I, unless someone explains it to me?" He begged Philip to come up and sit with him. 8.32. Now the passage of the Scripture which he was reading was this, "He was led as a sheep to the slaughter. As a lamb before his shearer is silent, So he doesn't open his mouth. 8.33. In his humiliation, his judgment was taken away. Who will declare His generations? For his life is taken from the earth. 8.34. The eunuch answered Philip, "Please tell who the prophet is talking about: about himself, or about some other? 8.35. Philip opened his mouth, and beginning from this Scripture, preached to him Jesus. 8.36. As they went on the way, they came to some water, and the eunuch said, "Behold, here is water. What is keeping me from being baptized? 8.38. He commanded the chariot to stand still, and they both went down into the water, both Philip and the eunuch, and he baptized him. 8.39. When they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught Philip away, and the eunuch didn't see him any more, for he went on his way rejoicing. 9.10. Now there was a certain disciple at Damascus named Aias. The Lord said to him in a vision, "Aias!"He said, "Behold, it's me, Lord. 9.11. The Lord said to him, "Arise, and go to the street which is called Straight, and inquire in the house of Judas for one named Saul, a man of Tarsus. For behold, he is praying 9.12. and in a vision he has seen a man named Aias coming in, and laying his hands on him, that he might receive his sight. 9.13. But Aias answered, "Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much evil he did to your saints at Jerusalem. 9.14. Here he has authority from the chief priests to bind all who call on your name. 9.15. But the Lord said to him, "Go your way, for he is my chosen vessel to bear my name before the nations and kings, and the children of Israel. 9.16. For I will show him how many things he must suffer for my name's sake. 9.17. Aias departed, and entered into the house. Laying his hands on him, he said, "Brother Saul, the Lord, who appeared to you in the way which you came, has sent me, that you may receive your sight, and be filled with the Holy Spirit. 9.18. Immediately something like scales fell from his eyes, and he received his sight. He arose and was baptized. 9.19. He took food and was strengthened. Saul stayed several days with the disciples who were at Damascus. 10.19. While Peter thought about the vision, the Spirit said to him, "Behold, three men seek you. 10.20. But arise, get down, and go with them, doubting nothing; for I have sent them. 10.21. Peter went down to the men, and said, "Behold, I am he whom you seek. Why have you come? 10.22. They said, "Cornelius, a centurion, a righteous man and one who fears God, and well spoken of by all the nation of the Jews, was directed by a holy angel to invite you to his house, and to listen to what you say. 10.23. So he called them in and lodged them. On the next day Peter arose and went out with them, and some of the brothers from Joppa accompanied him. 10.24. On the next day they entered into Caesarea. Cornelius was waiting for them, having called together his relatives and his near friends. 10.39. We are witnesses of all things which he did both in the country of the Jews, and in Jerusalem; whom they also killed, hanging him on a tree. 10.40. God raised him up the third day, and gave him to be revealed 10.41. not to all the people, but to witnesses who were chosen before by God, to us, who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. 13.26. Brothers, children of the stock of Abraham, and those among you who fear God, the word of this salvation is sent out to you. 13.27. For those who dwell in Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they didn't know him, nor the voices of the prophets which are read every Sabbath, fulfilled them by condemning him. 13.28. Though they found no cause for death, they still asked Pilate to have him killed. 13.29. When they had fulfilled all things that were written about him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a tomb. 13.30. But God raised him from the dead 13.31. and he was seen for many days by those who came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses to the people. 13.32. We bring you good news of the promise made to the fathers 13.33. that God has fulfilled the same to us, their children, in that he raised up Jesus. As it is also written in the second psalm, 'You are my Son. Today I have become your father.' 13.34. Concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he has spoken thus: 'I will give you the holy and sure blessings of David.' 13.35. Therefore he says also in another psalm, 'You will not allow your Holy One to see decay.' 13.36. For David, after he had in his own generation served the counsel of God, fell asleep, and was laid with his fathers, and saw decay. 13.37. But he whom God raised up saw no decay. 16.9. A vision appeared to Paul in the night. There was a man of Macedonia standing, begging him, and saying, "Come over into Macedonia and help us. 16.10. When he had seen the vision, immediately we sought to go out to Macedonia, concluding that the Lord had called us to preach the gospel to them. 17.3. explaining and demonstrating that the Christ had to suffer, and to rise again from the dead, and saying, "This Jesus, whom I proclaim to you, is the Christ. 17.18. Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also encountered him. Some said, "What does this babbler want to say?"Others said, "He seems to be advocating foreign demons," because he preached Jesus and the resurrection. 17.23. For as I passed along, and observed the objects of your worship, I found also an altar with this inscription: 'TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.' What therefore you worship in ignorance, this I announce to you. 17.30. The times of ignorance therefore God overlooked. But now he commands that all men everywhere should repent 17.31. because he has appointed a day in which he will judge the world in righteousness by the man whom he has ordained; whereof he has given assurance to all men, in that he has raised him from the dead. 17.32. Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, "We want to hear you yet again concerning this. 18.12. But when Gallio was proconsul of Achaia, the Jews with one accord rose up against Paul and brought him before the judgment seat 18.13. saying, "This man persuades men to worship God contrary to the law. 18.14. But when Paul was about to open his mouth, Gallio said to the Jews, "If indeed it were a matter of wrong or of wicked crime, Jews, it would be reasonable that I should bear with you; 18.15. but if they are questions about words and names and your own law, look to it yourselves. For I don't want to be a judge of these matters. 19.21. Now after these things had ended, Paul determined in the spirit, when he had passed through Macedonia and Achaia, to go to Jerusalem, saying, "After I have been there, I must also see Rome. 19.22. Having sent into Macedonia two of those who ministered to him, Timothy and Erastus, he himself stayed in Asia for a while. 19.23. About that time there arose no small stir concerning the Way. 19.24. For a certain man named Demetrius, a silversmith, who made silver shrines of Artemis, brought no little business to the craftsmen 19.25. whom he gathered together, with the workmen of like occupation, and said, "Sirs, you know that by this business we have our wealth. 19.26. You see and hear, that not at Ephesus alone, but almost throughout all Asia, this Paul has persuaded and turned away many people, saying that they are no gods, that are made with hands. 19.27. Not only is there danger that this our trade come into disrepute, but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis will be counted as nothing, and her majesty destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worships. 19.28. When they heard this they were filled with anger, and cried out, saying, "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians! 19.29. The whole city was filled with confusion, and they rushed with one accord into the theater, having seized Gaius and Aristarchus, men of Macedonia, Paul's companions in travel. 19.30. When Paul wanted to enter in to the people, the disciples didn't allow him. 19.31. Certain also of the Asiarchs, being his friends, sent to him and begged him not to venture into the theater. 19.32. Some therefore cried one thing, and some another, for the assembly was in confusion. Most of them didn't know why they had come together. 19.33. They brought Alexander out of the multitude, the Jews putting him forward. Alexander beckoned with his hand, and would have made a defense to the people. 19.34. But when they perceived that he was a Jew, all with one voice for a time of about two hours cried out, "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians! 19.35. When the town clerk had quieted the multitude, he said, "You men of Ephesus, what man is there who doesn't know that the city of the Ephesians is temple-keeper of the great goddess Artemis, and of the image which fell down from Zeus? 19.36. Seeing then that these things can't be denied, you ought to be quiet, and to do nothing rash. 19.37. For you have brought these men here, who are neither robbers of temples nor blasphemers of your goddess. 19.38. If therefore Demetrius and the craftsmen who are with him have a matter against anyone, the courts are open, and there are proconsuls. Let them press charges against one another. 19.39. But if you seek anything about other matters, it will be settled in the regular assembly. 19.40. For indeed we are in danger of being accused concerning this day's riot, there being no cause. Concerning it, we wouldn't be able to give an account of this commotion. 19.41. When he had thus spoken, he dismissed the assembly. 21.3. When we had come in sight of Cyprus, leaving it on the left hand, we sailed to Syria, and landed at Tyre, for there the ship was to unload her cargo. 21.4. Having found disciples, we stayed there seven days. These said to Paul through the Spirit, that he should not go up to Jerusalem. 21.5. When it happened that we had accomplished the days, we departed and went on our journey. They all, with wives and children, brought us on our way until we were out of the city. Kneeling down on the beach, we prayed. 21.6. After saying goodbye to each other, we went on board the ship, and they returned home again. 21.7. When we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolemais. We greeted the brothers, and stayed with them one day. 21.8. On the next day, we, who were Paul's companions, departed, and came to Caesarea. We entered into the house of Philip the evangelist, who was one of the seven, and stayed with him. 21.9. Now this man had four virgin daughters who prophesied. 21.10. As we stayed there some days, a certain prophet named Agabus came down from Judea. 21.11. Coming to us, and taking Paul's belt, he bound his own feet and hands, and said, "Thus says the Holy Spirit: 'So will the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man who owns this belt, and will deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles.' 21.12. When we heard these things, both we and they of that place begged him not to go up to Jerusalem. 21.13. Then Paul answered, "What are you doing, weeping and breaking my heart? For I am ready not only to be bound, but also to die at Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus. 21.14. When he would not be persuaded, we ceased, saying, "The Lord's will be done. 22.25. When they had tied him up with thongs, Paul asked the centurion who stood by, "Is it lawful for you to scourge a man who is a Roman, and not found guilty? 22.26. When the centurion heard it, he went to the commanding officer and told him, "Watch what you are about to do, for this man is a Roman! 23.6. But when Paul perceived that the one part were Sadducees and the other Pharisees, he cried out in the council, "Men and brothers, I am a Pharisee, a son of Pharisees. Concerning the hope and resurrection of the dead I am being judged! 23.19. The commanding officer took him by the hand, and going aside, asked him privately, "What is it that you have to tell me? 23.27. This man was seized by the Jews, and was about to be killed by them, when I came with the soldiers and rescued him, having learned that he was a Roman. 23.29. I found him to be accused about questions of their law, but to have nothing laid to his charge worthy of death or of bonds. 24.15. having hope toward God, which these also themselves look for, that there will be a resurrection of the dead, both of the just and unjust. 24.16. Herein I also practice always having a conscience void of offense toward God and men. 24.17. Now after some years, I came to bring gifts to the needy to my nation, and offerings; 24.18. amid which certain Jews from Asia found me purified in the temple, with no crowd, nor yet with tumult. 24.19. They ought to have been here before you, and to make accusation, if they had anything against me. 24.20. Or else let these men themselves say what injustice they found in me when I stood before the council 24.21. unless it is for this one thing that I cried standing among them, 'Concerning the resurrection of the dead I am being judged before you today!' 25.6. When he had stayed among them more than ten days, he went down to Caesarea, and on the next day he sat on the judgment seat, and commanded Paul to be brought. 25.7. When he had come, the Jews who had come down from Jerusalem stood around him, bringing against him many and grievous charges which they could not prove 25.8. while he said in his defense, "Neither against the law of the Jews, nor against the temple, nor against Caesar, have I sinned at all. 25.9. But Festus, desiring to gain favor with the Jews, answered Paul and said, "Will you go up to Jerusalem, and there be judged of these things before me? 25.10. But Paul said, "I am standing before Caesar's judgment seat, where I ought to be tried. I have done no wrong to the Jews, as you also know very well. 25.11. For if I have done wrong, and have committed anything worthy of death, I don't refuse to die; but if none of those things is true that these accuse me of, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar! 25.12. Then Festus, when he had conferred with the council, answered, "You have appealed to Caesar. To Caesar you will go. 25.13. Now when some days had passed, Agrippa the King and Bernice arrived at Caesarea, and greeted Festus. 25.14. As they stayed there many days, Festus laid Paul's case before the King, saying, "There is a certain man left a prisoner by Felix; 25.16. To whom I answered that it is not the custom of the Romans to give up any man to destruction, before the accused have met the accusers face to face, and have had opportunity to make his defense concerning the matter laid against him. 25.18. Concerning whom, when the accusers stood up, they brought no charge of such things as I supposed; 25.20. I, being perplexed how to inquire concerning these things, asked whether he would go to Jerusalem and there be judged concerning these matters. 25.21. But when Paul had appealed to be kept for the decision of the emperor, I commanded him to be kept until I could send him to Caesar. 25.22. Agrippa said to Festus, "I also would like to hear the man myself.""Tomorrow," he said, "you will hear him. 25.23. So on the next day, when Agrippa and Bernice had come with great pomp, and they had entered into the place of hearing with the commanding officers and principal men of the city, at the command of Festus, Paul was brought in. 25.25. But when I found that he had committed nothing worthy of death, and as he himself appealed to the emperor I determined to send him. 25.26. of whom I have no certain thing to write to my lord. Therefore I have brought him forth before you, and especially before you, king Agrippa, that, after examination, I may have something to write. 26.6. Now I stand here to be judged for the hope of the promise made by God to our fathers 26.7. which our twelve tribes, earnestly serving night and day, hope to attain. Concerning this hope I am accused by the Jews, King Agrippa! 26.8. Why is it judged incredible with you, if God does raise the dead? 26.20. but declared first to them of Damascus, at Jerusalem, and throughout all the country of Judea, and also to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God, doing works worthy of repentance. 26.22. Having therefore obtained the help that is from God, I stand to this day testifying both to small and great, saying nothing but what the prophets and Moses did say should come 26.23. how the Christ must suffer, and how he first by the resurrection of the dead should proclaim light both to these people and to the Gentiles. 26.30. The king rose up with the governor, and Bernice, and those who sat with them. 26.31. When they had withdrawn, they spoke one to another, saying, "This man does nothing worthy of death or of bonds. 26.32. Agrippa said to Festus, "This man might have been set free if he had not appealed to Caesar. 28.18. who, when they had examined me, desired to set me free, because there was no cause of death in me.
9. New Testament, Apocalypse, 20.4-20.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20.4. I saw thrones, and they sat on them, and judgment was given to them. I saw the souls of those who had been beheaded for the testimony of Jesus, and for the word of God, and such as didn't worship the beast nor his image, and didn't receive the mark on their forehead and on their hand. They lived, and reigned with Christ for the thousand years. 20.5. The rest of the dead didn't live until the thousand years were finished. This is the first resurrection.
10. New Testament, Hebrews, 7.1-10.18, 7.25, 9.11, 9.12, 10.19, 10.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.19. Having therefore, brothers, boldness to enter into the holy place by the blood of Jesus
11. New Testament, Romans, 6.8, 6.10, 14.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.8. But if we died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him; 6.10. For the death that he died, he died to sin one time; but the life that he lives, he lives to God. 14.9. For to this end Christ died, rose, and lived again, that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living.
12. New Testament, John, 5.22, 11.25, 11.39 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.22. For the Father judges no one, but he has given all judgment to the Son 11.25. Jesus said to her, "I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me, though he die, yet will he live. 11.39. Jesus said, "Take away the stone."Martha, the sister of him who was dead, said to him, "Lord, by this time there is a stench, for he has been dead four days.
13. New Testament, Luke, 9.51, 23.12-23.13, 23.16, 24.5, 24.47 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.51. It came to pass, when the days were near that he should be taken up, he intently set his face to go to Jerusalem 23.12. Herod and Pilate became friends with each other that very day, for before that they were enemies with each other. 23.13. Pilate called together the chief priests and the rulers and the people 23.16. I will therefore chastise him and release him. 24.5. Becoming terrified, they bowed their faces down to the earth. They said to them, "Why do you seek the living among the dead? 24.47. and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name to all the nations, beginning at Jerusalem.
14. Suetonius, Nero, 15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Tacitus, Annals, 13.4, 13.33, 14.5, 14.41 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13.4.  However, when the mockeries of sorrow had been carried to their close, he entered the curia; and, after an opening reference to the authority of the Fathers and the uimity of the army, stated that "he had before him advice and examples pointing him to an admirable system of government. Nor had his youth been poisoned by civil war or family strife: he brought to his task no hatreds, no wrongs, no desire for vengeance. He then outlined the character of the coming principate, the points which had provoked recent and intense dissatisfaction being specially discounteced:— "He would not constitute himself a judge of all cases, secluding accusers and defendants within the same four walls and allowing the influence of a few individuals to run riot. Under his roof would be no venality, no loophole for intrigue: the palace and the state would be things separate. Let the senate retain its old prerogatives! Let Italy and the public provinces take their stand before the judgement-seats of the consuls, and let the consuls grant them access to the Fathers: for the armies delegated to his charge he would himself be responsible. 13.33.  The same year saw many on their trial. Publius Celer, one of the number, indicted by the province of Asia, the Caesar could not absolve: he therefore held the case in abeyance until the defendant died of old age; for in his murder (already recorded) of the proconsul Silanus, Celer had to his credit a crime of sufficient magnitude to cover the rest of his delinquencies. A charge had been laid by the Cilicians against Cossutianus Capito, a questionable and repulsive character, who had assumed that the same chartered insolence which he had exhibited in the capital would be permitted in a province. Beaten, however, by the tenacity of the prosecution, he finally threw up his defence, and was sentenced under the law of extortion. On behalf of Eprius Marcellus, from whom the Lycians were claiming reparation, intrigue was so effective that a number of his accusers were penalized by exile, on the ground that they had endangered an innocent man. 14.5.  A starlit night and the calm of an unruffled sea appeared to have been sent by Heaven to afford proof of guilt. The ship had made no great way, and two of Agrippina's household were in attendance, Crepereius Gallus standing not far from the tiller, while Acerronia, bending over the feet of the recumbent princess, recalled exultantly the penitence of the son and the re-entry of the mother into favour. Suddenly the signal was given: the canopy above them, which had been heavily weighted with lead, dropped, and Crepereius was crushed and killed on the spot. Agrippina and Acerronia were saved by the height of the couch-sides, which, as it happened, were too solid to give way under the impact. Nor did the break-up of the vessel follow: for confusion was universal, and even the men accessory to the plot were impeded by the large numbers of the ignorant. The crew then decided to throw their weight on one side and so capsize the ship; but, even on their own part, agreement came too slowly for a sudden emergency, and a counter-effort by others allowed the victims a gentler fall into the waves. Acerronia, however, incautious enough to raise the cry that she was Agrippina, and to demand aid for the emperor's mother, was despatched with poles, oars, and every nautical weapon that came to hand. Agrippina, silent and so not generally recognised, though she received one wound in the shoulder, swam until she was met by a few fishing-smacks, and so reached the Lucrine lake, whence she was carried into her own villa. 14.41.  The same day brought also the fall of a youthful ex-quaestor, Pompeius Aelianus, charged with complicity in the villainies of Fabianus: he was outlawed from Italy and also from Spain, the country of his origin. The same humiliation was inflicted on Valerius Ponticus, because, to save the accused from prosecution before the city prefect, with the intention of defeating for the moment by a legal subterfuge, and in the long run by collusion. A clause was added to the senatorial decree, providing that any person buying or selling this form of connivance was to be liable to the same penalty as if convicted of calumny in a criminal trial.
16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.1.4, 1.24.3, 5.14.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1.4. The Athenians have also another harbor, at Munychia, with a temple of Artemis of Munychia, and yet another at Phalerum, as I have already stated, and near it is a sanctuary of Demeter. Here there is also a temple of Athena Sciras, and one of Zeus some distance away, and altars of the gods named Unknown, and of heroes, and of the children of Theseus and Phalerus; for this Phalerus is said by the Athenians to have sailed with Jason to Colchis . There is also an altar of Androgeos, son of Minos, though it is called that of Heros; those, however, who pay special attention to the study of their country's antiquities know that it belongs to Androgeos. 1.24.3. I have already stated that the Athenians are far more devoted to religion than other men. They were the first to surname Athena Ergane (Worker); they were the first to set up limbless Hermae, and the temple of their goddess is shared by the Spirit of Good men. Those who prefer artistic workmanship to mere antiquity may look at the following: a man wearing a helmet, by Cleoetas, whose nails the artist has made of silver, and an image of Earth beseeching Zeus to rain upon her; perhaps the Athenians them selves needed showers, or may be all the Greeks had been plagued with a drought. There also are set up Timotheus the son of Conon and Conon himself; Procne too, who has already made up her mind about the boy, and Itys as well—a group dedicated by Alcamenes. Athena is represented displaying the olive plant, and Poseidon the wave 5.14.8. An account of the great altar I gave a little way back; it is called the altar of Olympian Zeus. By it is an altar of Unknown Gods, and after this an altar of Zeus Purifier, one of Victory, and another of Zeus—this time surnamed Underground. There are also altars of all gods, and of Hera surnamed Olympian, this too being made of ashes. They say that it was dedicated by Clymenus. After this comes an altar of Apollo and Hermes in common, because the Greeks have a story about them that Hermes invented the lyre and Apollo the lute.
17. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.23 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

18. Anon., 4 Ezra, 14.34

14.34. If you, then, will rule over your minds and discipline your hearts, you shall be kept alive, and after death you shall obtain mercy.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abimelech/ebed-melech Allison (2018), 4 Baruch, 276
acts of the apostles Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
adjudication,adjudicating Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
agrippa ii Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
appeal Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
areopagus speech Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
athens,ancient views of Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
bar kokhba revolt,persecution in acts Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 140
bar kokhba revolt,persecution in revelation Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 140
blood Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
body of christ Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
caligula Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
case Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
claudius Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
consilium Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
court Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
covenant,mosaic Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
crucifixion Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
culture,cultural affiliations in galilee Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 169
divine plan/βουλή Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 260
dreams Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 260
exhortation Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
family Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
festus,porcius Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
flesh Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
general Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 304
herod,agrippa ii Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 260, 304
ignatius of antioch,jewishchristian relations Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 169
image Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
inscription,introductory rhetorical device Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
irony Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 260
jerusalem Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 260
judge Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
jurisdiction Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
legate,legatus,legati Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
luke,as historian Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
luke,hearing before herod antipas Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
luke,jesus Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
luke,jesus before pilate Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
luke,trial of jesus Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
maiestas Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
minor,athenians Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
miracle Allison (2018), 4 Baruch, 276
nero Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
of jesus Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 304
paul,areopagus speech Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
paul Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
paul (apostle) Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
pausanias,unknown gods Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
perfection Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
pharisees Allison (2018), 4 Baruch, 276
pilate Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
porcius festus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
power Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
prefect,city/urban prefect Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
quaestio Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
repentance Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 260
resurrection Allison (2018), 4 Baruch, 276; Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
roman empire,governor and crowds Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
roman empire,judicial procedure Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
roman empire,power of governor Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 761
salvation Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
senate Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
senator,senatorial' Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
seneca the elder Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
suetonius Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
suffering Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 304
superstition Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
symbolism Allison (2018), 4 Baruch, 276
tacitus Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 157
tent Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97
universality Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 260
unknown god,cults Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
unknown god,interpretive options Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
unknown gods,pausanias Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 629
veil Vanhoye, Moore, Ounsworth (2018), A Perfect Priest: Studies in the Letter to the Hebrews. 97