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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8243
New Testament, Acts, 12.2


ἀνεῖλεν δὲ Ἰάκωβον τὸν ἀδελφὸν Ἰωάνου μαχαίρῃ·He killed James, the brother of John, with the sword.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

25 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 1.22 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.22. וַיְצַו פַּרְעֹה לְכָל־עַמּוֹ לֵאמֹר כָּל־הַבֵּן הַיִּלּוֹד הַיְאֹרָה תַּשְׁלִיכֻהוּ וְכָל־הַבַּת תְּחַיּוּן׃ 1.22. And Pharaoh charged all his people, saying: ‘Every son that is born ye shall cast into the river, and every daughter ye shall save alive.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, 1 Kings, 17.17-17.24, 21.8-21.13 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17.17. וַיְהִי אַחַר הַדְּבָרִים הָאֵלֶּה חָלָה בֶּן־הָאִשָּׁה בַּעֲלַת הַבָּיִת וַיְהִי חָלְיוֹ חָזָק מְאֹד עַד אֲשֶׁר לֹא־נוֹתְרָה־בּוֹ נְשָׁמָה׃ 17.18. וַתֹּאמֶר אֶל־אֵלִיָּהוּ מַה־לִּי וָלָךְ אִישׁ הָאֱלֹהִים בָּאתָ אֵלַי לְהַזְכִּיר אֶת־עֲוֺנִי וּלְהָמִית אֶת־בְּנִי׃ 17.19. וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלֶיהָ תְּנִי־לִי אֶת־בְּנֵךְ וַיִּקָּחֵהוּ מֵחֵיקָהּ וַיַּעֲלֵהוּ אֶל־הָעֲלִיָּה אֲשֶׁר־הוּא יֹשֵׁב שָׁם וַיַּשְׁכִּבֵהוּ עַל־מִטָּתוֹ׃ 17.21. וַיִּתְמֹדֵד עַל־הַיֶּלֶד שָׁלֹשׁ פְּעָמִים וַיִּקְרָא אֶל־יְהוָה וַיֹּאמַר יְהוָה אֱלֹהָי תָּשָׁב נָא נֶפֶשׁ־הַיֶּלֶד הַזֶּה עַל־קִרְבּוֹ׃ 17.22. וַיִּשְׁמַע יְהוָה בְּקוֹל אֵלִיָּהוּ וַתָּשָׁב נֶפֶשׁ־הַיֶּלֶד עַל־קִרְבּוֹ וַיֶּחִי׃ 17.23. וַיִּקַּח אֵלִיָּהוּ אֶת־הַיֶּלֶד וַיֹּרִדֵהוּ מִן־הָעֲלִיָּה הַבַּיְתָה וַיִּתְּנֵהוּ לְאִמּוֹ וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלִיָּהוּ רְאִי חַי בְּנֵךְ׃ 17.24. וַתֹּאמֶר הָאִשָּׁה אֶל־אֵלִיָּהוּ עַתָּה זֶה יָדַעְתִּי כִּי אִישׁ אֱלֹהִים אָתָּה וּדְבַר־יְהוָה בְּפִיךָ אֱמֶת׃ 21.8. וַתִּכְתֹּב סְפָרִים בְּשֵׁם אַחְאָב וַתַּחְתֹּם בְּחֹתָמוֹ וַתִּשְׁלַח הספרים [סְפָרִים] אֶל־הַזְקֵנִים וְאֶל־הַחֹרִים אֲשֶׁר בְּעִירוֹ הַיֹּשְׁבִים אֶת־נָבוֹת׃ 21.9. וַתִּכְתֹּב בַּסְּפָרִים לֵאמֹר קִרְאוּ־צוֹם וְהוֹשִׁיבוּ אֶת־נָבוֹת בְּרֹאשׁ הָעָם׃ 21.11. וַיַּעֲשׂוּ אַנְשֵׁי עִירוֹ הַזְּקֵנִים וְהַחֹרִים אֲשֶׁר הַיֹּשְׁבִים בְּעִירוֹ כַּאֲשֶׁר שָׁלְחָה אֲלֵיהֶם אִיזָבֶל כַּאֲשֶׁר כָּתוּב בַּסְּפָרִים אֲשֶׁר שָׁלְחָה אֲלֵיהֶם׃ 21.12. קָרְאוּ צוֹם וְהֹשִׁיבוּ אֶת־נָבוֹת בְּרֹאשׁ הָעָם׃ 21.13. וַיָּבֹאוּ שְׁנֵי הָאֲנָשִׁים בְּנֵי־בְלִיַּעַל וַיֵּשְׁבוּ נֶגְדּוֹ וַיְעִדֻהוּ אַנְשֵׁי הַבְּלִיַּעַל אֶת־נָבוֹת נֶגֶד הָעָם לֵאמֹר בֵּרַךְ נָבוֹת אֱלֹהִים וָמֶלֶךְ וַיֹּצִאֻהוּ מִחוּץ לָעִיר וַיִּסְקְלֻהוּ בָאֲבָנִים וַיָּמֹת׃ 17.17. And it came to pass after these things, that the son of the woman, the mistress of the house, fell sick; and his sickness was so sore, that there was no breath left in him." 17.18. And she said unto Elijah: ‘What have I to do with thee, O thou man of God? art thou come unto me to bring my sin to remembrance, and to slay my son?’" 17.19. And he said unto her: ‘Give me thy son.’ And he took him out of her bosom, and carried him up into the upper chamber, where he abode, and laid him upon his own bed." 17.20. And he cried unto the LORD, and said: ‘O LORD my God, hast Thou also brought evil upon the widow with whom I sojourn, by slaying her son?’" 17.21. And he stretched himself upon the child three times, and cried unto the LORD, and said: ‘O LORD my God, I pray thee, let this child’s soul come back into him.’" 17.22. And the LORD hearkened unto the voice of Elijah; and the soul of the child came back into him, and he revived." 17.23. And Elijah took the child, and brought him down out of the upper chamber into the house, and delivered him unto his mother; and Elijah said: ‘See, thy son liveth.’" 17.24. And the woman said to Elijah: ‘Now I know that thou art a man of God, and that the word of the LORD in thy mouth is truth.’" 21.8. So she wrote letters in Ahab’s name, and sealed them with his seal, and sent the letters unto the elders and to the nobles that were in his city, and that dwelt with Naboth." 21.9. And she wrote in the letters, saying: ‘Proclaim a fast, and set Naboth at the head of the people;" 21.10. and set two men, base fellows, before him, and let them bear witness against him, saying: Thou didst curse God and the king. And then carry him out, and stone him, that he die.’" 21.11. And the men of his city, even the elders and the nobles who dwelt in his city, did as Jezebel had sent unto them, according as it was written in the letters which she had sent unto them." 21.12. They proclaimed a fast, and set Naboth at the head of the people." 21.13. And the two men, the base fellows, came in and sat before him; and the base fellows bore witness against him, even against Naboth, in the presence of the people, saying: ‘Naboth did curse God and the king.’ Then they carried him forth out of the city, and stoned him with stones, that he died."
3. Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings, 5 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 53.12 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

53.12. לָכֵן אֲחַלֶּק־לוֹ בָרַבִּים וְאֶת־עֲצוּמִים יְחַלֵּק שָׁלָל תַּחַת אֲשֶׁר הֶעֱרָה לַמָּוֶת נַפְשׁוֹ וְאֶת־פֹּשְׁעִים נִמְנָה וְהוּא חֵטְא־רַבִּים נָשָׂא וְלַפֹּשְׁעִים יַפְגִּיעַ׃ 53.12. Therefore will I divide him a portion among the great, And he shall divide the spoil with the mighty; Because he bared his soul unto death, And was numbered with the transgressors; Yet he bore the sin of many, And made intercession for the transgressors."
5. Hebrew Bible, Joshua, 7 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Homer, Iliad, 24, 6, 2 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

7. Anon., Jubilees, 47.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

47.9. And she said (unto her): "Go." And she went and called thy mother Jochebed, and she gave her wages, and she nursed thee.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.10-1.11, 1.15, 1.21, 1.23, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

1.10. but when, as is commonly the case in monarchies, some persons discovered what was kept secret and in darkness, of those persons who are always eager to bring any new report to the king, his parents being afraid lest while seeking to secure the safety of one individual, they who were many might become involved in his destruction, with many tears exposed their child on the banks of the river, and departed groaning and lamenting, pitying themselves for the necessity which had fallen upon them, and calling themselves the slayers and murderers of their child, and commiserating the infant too for his destruction, which they had hoped to avert. 1.11. Then, as was natural for people involved in a miserable misfortune, they accused themselves as having brought a heavier affliction on themselves than they need have done. "For why," said they, "did we not expose him at the first moment of his birth?" For people in general do not look upon one who has not lived long enough to partake of salutary food as a human being at all. "But we, in our superfluous affection, have nourished him these three entire months, causing ourselves by such conduct more abundant grief, and inflicting upon him a heavier punishment, in order that he, having at last attained to a great capacity for feeling pleasures and pains, should at last perish in the perception of the most grievous evils. 1.15. Then, after she had surveyed him from head to foot, and admired his elegant form and healthy vigorous appearance, and saw that he was crying, she had compassion on him, her soul being already moved within her by maternal feelings of affection as if he had been her own child. And when she knew that the infant belonged to one of the Hebrews who was afraid because of the commandment of the king, she herself conceived the idea of rearing him up, and took counsel with herself on the subject, thinking that it was not safe to bring him at once into the palace; 1.21. And immediately he had all kinds of masters, one after another, some coming of their own accord from the neighbouring countries and the different districts of Egypt, and some being even procured from Greece by the temptation of large presents. But in a short time he surpassed all their knowledge, anticipating all their lessons by the excellent natural endowments of his own genius; so that everything in his case appeared to be a ecollecting rather than a learning, while he himself also, without any teacher, comprehended by his instinctive genius many difficult subjects; 1.23. Accordingly he speedily learnt arithmetic, and geometry, and the whole science of rhythm and harmony and metre, and the whole of music, by means of the use of musical instruments, and by lectures on the different arts, and by explanations of each topic; and lessons on these subjects were given him by Egyptian philosophers, who also taught him the philosophy which is contained in symbols, which they exhibit in those sacred characters of hieroglyphics, as they are called, and also that philosophy which is conversant about that respect which they pay to animals which they invest with the honours due to God. And all the other branches of the encyclical education he learnt from Greeks; and the philosophers from the adjacent countries taught him Assyrian literature and the knowledge of the heavenly bodies so much studied by the Chaldaeans. 2.1. The first volume of this treatise relates to the subject of the birth and bringing up of Moses, and also of his education and of his government of his people, which he governed not merely irreproachably, but in so exceedingly praiseworthy a manner; and also of all the affairs, which took place in Egypt, and in the travels and journeyings of the nation, and of the events which happened with respect to their crossing the Red Sea and in the desert, which surpass all power of description; and, moreover, of all the labours which he conducted to a successful issue, and of the inheritances which he distributed in portions to his soldiers. But the book which we are now about to compose relates to the affairs which follow those others in due order, and bear a certain correspondence and connection with them.
9. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 2.238 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.238. 1. Moses, therefore, when he was born, and brought up in the foregoing manner, and came to the age of maturity, made his virtue manifest to the Egyptians; and showed that he was born for the bringing them down, and raising the Israelites. And the occasion he laid hold of was this:—
10. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15.9, 16.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.9. For I am the least of theapostles, who is not worthy to be called an apostle, because Ipersecuted the assembly of God. 16.1. Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I commandedthe assemblies of Galatia, you do likewise.
11. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 1.6-1.7, 2.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.6. You became imitators of us, and of the Lord, having received the word in much affliction, with joy of the Holy Spirit 1.7. so that you became an example to all who believe in Macedonia and in Achaia. 2.14. For you, brothers, became imitators of the assemblies of God which are in Judea in Christ Jesus; for you also suffered the same things from your own countrymen, even as they did from the Jews;
12. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 8.1-8.4, 11.24-11.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. New Testament, Acts, 1, 1.15, 1.16, 1.17, 1.18, 1.19, 1.20, 1.21, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.26, 2.14, 2.36, 3, 3.13, 3.14, 3.15, 4, 4.34, 5, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, 5.17, 5.18, 5.19, 5.20, 5.21, 5.22, 5.23, 5.24, 5.25, 5.26, 5.27, 5.28, 5.29, 5.30, 5.31, 5.32, 5.33, 5.34, 5.35, 5.36, 5.37, 5.38, 5.39, 5.40, 6.9, 6.10, 6.11, 6.12, 6.13, 6.14, 7.20, 7.21, 7.22, 7.51, 7.52, 7.53, 7.54, 7.54-8.1, 7.55, 7.56, 7.57, 7.58, 7.58-8.1, 7.59, 7.60, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.9, 8.10, 8.11, 8.12, 8.13, 8.14, 8.15, 8.16, 8.17, 8.18, 8.19, 8.20, 8.21, 8.22, 8.23, 8.24, 8.25, 8.26, 8.27, 8.28, 8.29, 8.30, 8.31, 8.32, 8.33, 8.34, 8.35, 8.36, 8.37, 8.38, 8.39, 8.40, 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.9, 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14, 9.15, 9.16, 9.17, 9.19, 9.20, 9.21, 9.22, 9.23, 9.24, 9.25, 9.26, 9.27, 9.28, 9.29, 9.30, 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.9, 10.10, 10.11, 10.12, 10.13, 10.14, 10.15, 10.16, 10.17, 10.18, 10.19, 10.20, 10.21, 10.22, 10.23, 10.24, 10.25, 10.26, 10.27, 10.28, 10.29, 10.30, 10.31, 10.32, 10.33, 11.19, 11.20, 11.21, 11.27, 11.28, 11.29, 11.30, 12.1, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.6, 12.7, 12.8, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.12, 12.13, 12.14, 12.15, 12.16, 12.17, 12.18, 12.19, 12.20, 12.21, 12.22, 12.23, 12.24, 13.16, 13.17, 13.18, 13.19, 13.20, 13.21, 13.22, 13.23, 13.24, 13.25, 13.26, 13.27, 13.28, 13.29, 13.30, 13.31, 13.32, 13.33, 13.34, 13.35, 13.36, 13.37, 13.38, 13.39, 13.40, 13.41, 13.42, 13.43, 14.2, 14.3, 14.4, 14.19, 15, 16.13, 16.14, 16.15, 16.16, 16.17, 16.18, 16.19, 16.20, 16.21, 16.22, 16.23, 16.24, 16.25, 16.26, 16.27, 16.28, 16.29, 16.30, 16.31, 16.32, 16.33, 16.34, 16.35, 16.36, 16.37, 16.38, 16.40, 17.5, 17.6, 17.13, 19.23, 20.2, 20.3, 20.17, 20.18, 20.19, 20.20, 20.21, 20.22, 20.23, 20.24, 20.25, 20.26, 20.27, 20.28, 20.29, 20.30, 20.31, 20.32, 20.33, 20.34, 20.35, 20.36, 20.37, 20.38, 21.10, 21.11, 21.12, 21.13, 21.14, 21.27, 21.28, 21.29, 21.30, 21.31, 22.20, 22.22, 23.12, 23.14, 23.21, 28.22, 28.24, 28.25, 28.26, 28.27, 28.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. New Testament, Galatians, 1.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.13. For you have heard of my way ofliving in time past in the Jews' religion, how that beyond measure Ipersecuted the assembly of God, and ravaged it.
15. New Testament, Philippians, 3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.6. concerning zeal, persecuting the assembly; concerning the righteousness which is in the law, found blameless.
16. New Testament, Romans, 15.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.26. For it has been the good pleasure of Macedonia and Achaia to make a certain contribution for the poor among the saints who are at Jerusalem.
17. New Testament, John, 9.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.22. His parents said these things because they feared the Jews; for the Jews had already agreed that if any man would confess him as Christ, he would be put out of the synagogue.
18. New Testament, Luke, 1.5, 2.1-2.2, 3.1-3.2, 7.11-7.17, 9.3, 9.31, 10.4, 13.1-13.5, 13.33, 18.32, 19.41-19.44, 22.6, 22.35-22.38, 22.51, 23.12, 23.49, 24.13-24.53 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.5. There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the priestly division of Abijah. He had a wife of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. 2.1. Now it happened in those days, that a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be enrolled. 2.2. This was the first enrollment made when Quirinius was governor of Syria. 3.1. Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of the region of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilene 3.2. in the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John, the son of Zacharias, in the wilderness. 7.11. It happened soon afterwards, that he went to a city called Nain. Many of his disciples, along with a great multitude, went with him. 7.12. Now when he drew near to the gate of the city, behold, one who was dead was carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. Many people of the city were with her. 7.13. When the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her, and said to her, "Don't cry. 7.14. He came near and touched the coffin, and the bearers stood still. He said, "Young man, I tell you, arise! 7.15. He who was dead sat up, and began to speak. And he gave him to his mother. 7.16. Fear took hold of all, and they glorified God, saying, "A great prophet has arisen among us!" and, "God has visited his people! 7.17. This report went out concerning him in the whole of Judea, and in all the surrounding region. 9.3. He said to them, "Take nothing for your journey -- neither staffs, nor wallet, nor bread, nor money; neither have two coats apiece. 9.31. who appeared in glory, and spoke of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem. 10.4. Carry no purse, nor wallet, nor sandals. Greet no one on the way. 13.1. Now there were some present at the same time who told him about the Galilaeans, whose blood Pilate had mixed with their sacrifices. 13.2. Jesus answered them, "Do you think that these Galilaeans were worse sinners than all the other Galilaeans, because they suffered such things? 13.3. I tell you, no, but, unless you repent, you will all perish in the same way. 13.4. Or those eighteen, on whom the tower in Siloam fell, and killed them; do you think that they were worse offenders than all the men who dwell in Jerusalem? 13.5. I tell you, no, but, unless you repent, you will all perish in the same way. 13.33. Nevertheless I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the next day, for it can't be that a prophet perish outside of Jerusalem.' 18.32. For he will be delivered up to the Gentiles, will be mocked, treated shamefully, and spit on. 19.41. When he drew near, he saw the city and wept over it 19.42. saying, "If you, even you, had known today the things which belong to your peace! But now, they are hidden from your eyes. 19.43. For the days will come on you, when your enemies will throw up a barricade against you, surround you, hem you in on every side 19.44. and will dash you and your children within you to the ground. They will not leave in you one stone on another, because you didn't know the time of your visitation. 22.6. He consented, and sought an opportunity to deliver him to them in the absence of the multitude. 22.35. He said to them, "When I sent you out without purse, and wallet, and shoes, did you lack anything?"They said, "Nothing. 22.36. Then he said to them, "But now, whoever has a purse, let him take it, and likewise a wallet. Whoever has none, let him sell his cloak, and buy a sword. 22.37. For I tell you that this which is written must still be fulfilled in me: 'He was counted with the lawless.' For that which concerns me has an end. 22.38. They said, "Lord, behold, here are two swords."He said to them, "That is enough. 22.51. But Jesus answered, "Let me at least do this" -- and he touched his ear, and healed him. 23.12. Herod and Pilate became friends with each other that very day, for before that they were enemies with each other. 23.49. All his acquaintances, and the women who followed with him from Galilee, stood at a distance, watching these things. 24.13. Behold, two of them were going that very day to a village named Emmaus, which was sixty stadia from Jerusalem. 24.14. They talked with each other about all of these things which had happened. 24.15. It happened, while they talked and questioned together, that Jesus himself came near, and went with them. 24.16. But their eyes were kept from recognizing him. 24.17. He said to them, "What are you talking about as you walk, and are sad? 24.18. One of them, named Cleopas, answered him, "Are you the only stranger in Jerusalem who doesn't know the things which have happened there in these days? 24.19. He said to them, "What things?"They said to him, "The things concerning Jesus, the Nazarene, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people; 24.20. and how the chief priests and our rulers delivered him up to be condemned to death, and crucified him. 24.21. But we were hoping that it was he who would redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since these things happened. 24.22. Also, certain women of our company amazed us, having arrived early at the tomb; 24.23. and when they didn't find his body, they came saying that they had also seen a vision of angels, who said that he was alive. 24.24. Some of us went to the tomb, and found it just like the women had said, but they didn't see him. 24.25. He said to them, "Foolish men, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken! 24.26. Didn't the Christ have to suffer these things and to enter into his glory? 24.27. Beginning from Moses and from all the prophets, he explained to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself. 24.28. They drew near to the village, where they were going, and he acted like he would go further. 24.29. They urged him, saying, "Stay with us, for it is almost evening, and the day is almost over."He went in to stay with them. 24.30. It happened, that when he had sat down at the table with them, he took the bread and gave thanks. Breaking it, he gave to them. 24.31. Their eyes were opened, and they recognized him, and he vanished out of their sight. 24.32. They said one to another, "Weren't our hearts burning within us, while he spoke to us along the way, and while he opened the Scriptures to us? 24.33. Rising rose up that very hour, they returned to Jerusalem, and found the eleven gathered together, and those who were with them 24.34. saying, "The Lord is risen indeed, and has appeared to Simon! 24.35. They related the things that happened along the way, and how he was recognized by them in the breaking of the bread. 24.36. As they said these things, Jesus himself stood among them, and said to them, "Peace be to you. 24.37. But they were terrified and filled with fear, and supposed that they had seen a spirit. 24.38. He said to them, "Why are you troubled? Why do doubts arise in your hearts? 24.39. See my hands and my feet, that it is truly me. Touch me and see, for a spirit doesn't have flesh and bones, as you see that I have. 24.40. When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. 24.41. While they still didn't believe for joy, and wondered, he said to them, "Do you have anything here to eat? 24.42. They gave him a piece of a broiled fish and some honeycomb. 24.43. He took it, and ate in front of them. 24.44. He said to them, "This is what I told you, while I was still with you, that all things which are written in the law of Moses, the prophets, and the psalms, concerning me must be fulfilled. 24.45. Then he opened their minds, that they might understand the Scriptures. 24.46. He said to them, "Thus it is written, and thus it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead the third day 24.47. and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name to all the nations, beginning at Jerusalem. 24.48. You are witnesses of these things. 24.49. Behold, I send forth the promise of my Father on you. But wait in the city of Jerusalem until you are clothed with power from on high. 24.50. He led them out as far as Bethany, and he lifted up his hands, and blessed them. 24.51. It happened, while he blessed them, that he withdrew from them, and was carried up into heaven. 24.52. They worshiped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy 24.53. and were continually in the temple, praising and blessing God. Amen.
19. New Testament, Mark, 5.1-5.20, 6.17-6.29, 6.32-6.52, 10.33, 10.46-10.52, 15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.1. They came to the other side of the sea, into the country of the Gadarenes. 5.2. When he had come out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit 5.3. who had his dwelling in the tombs. Nobody could bind him any more, not even with chains 5.4. because he had been often bound with fetters and chains, and the chains had been torn apart by him, and the fetters broken in pieces. Nobody had the strength to tame him. 5.5. Always, night and day, in the tombs and in the mountains, he was crying out, and cutting himself with stones. 5.6. When he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and bowed down to him 5.7. and crying out with a loud voice, he said, "What have I to do with you, Jesus, you Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, don't torment me. 5.8. For he said to him, "Come out of the man, you unclean spirit! 5.9. He asked him, "What is your name?"He said to him, "My name is Legion, for we are many. 5.10. He begged him much that he would not send them away out of the country. 5.11. Now there was on the mountainside a great herd of pigs feeding. 5.12. All the demons begged him, saying, "Send us into the pigs, that we may enter into them. 5.13. At once Jesus gave them permission. The unclean spirits came out and entered into the pigs. The herd of about two thousand rushed down the steep bank into the sea, and they were drowned in the sea. 5.14. Those who fed them fled, and told it in the city and in the country. The people came to see what it was that had happened. 5.15. They came to Jesus, and saw him who had been possessed by demons sitting, clothed, and in his right mind, even him who had the legion; and they were afraid. 5.16. Those who saw it declared to them how it happened to him who was possessed by demons, and about the pigs. 5.17. They began to beg him to depart from their region. 5.18. As he was entering into the boat, he who had been possessed by demons begged him that he might be with him. 5.19. He didn't allow him, but said to him, "Go to your house, to your friends, and tell them what great things the Lord has done for you, and how he had mercy on you. 5.20. He went his way, and began to proclaim in Decapolis how Jesus had done great things for him, and everyone marveled. 6.17. For Herod himself had sent out and arrested John, and bound him in prison for the sake of Herodias, his brother Philip's wife, for he had married her. 6.18. For John said to Herod, "It is not lawful for you to have your brother's wife. 6.19. Herodias set herself against him, and desired to kill him, but she couldn't 6.20. for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and kept him safe. When he heard him, he did many things, and he heard him gladly. 6.21. Then a convenient day came, that Herod on his birthday made a supper for his nobles, the high officers, and the chief men of Galilee. 6.22. When the daughter of Herodias herself came in and danced, she pleased Herod and those sitting with him. The king said to the young lady, "Ask me whatever you want, and I will give it to you. 6.23. He swore to her, "Whatever you shall ask of me, I will give you, up to half of my kingdom. 6.24. She went out, and said to her mother, "What shall I ask?"She said, "The head of John the Baptizer. 6.25. She came in immediately with haste to the king, and asked, "I want you to give me right now the head of John the Baptizer on a platter. 6.26. The king was exceedingly sorry, but for the sake of his oaths, and of his dinner guests, he didn't wish to refuse her. 6.27. Immediately the king sent out a soldier of his guard, and commanded to bring John's head, and he went and beheaded him in the prison 6.28. and brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the young lady; and the young lady gave it to her mother. 6.29. When his disciples heard this, they came and took up his corpse, and laid it in a tomb. 6.32. They went away in the boat to a desert place by themselves. 6.33. They saw them going, and many recognized him and ran there on foot from all the cities. They arrived before them and came together to him. 6.34. Jesus came out, saw a great multitude, and he had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd, and he began to teach them many things. 6.35. When it was late in the day, his disciples came to him, and said, "This place is deserted, and it is late in the day. 6.36. Send them away, that they may go into the surrounding country and villages, and buy themselves bread, for they have nothing to eat. 6.37. But he answered them, "You give them something to eat."They asked him, "Shall we go and buy two hundred denarii worth of bread, and give them something to eat? 6.38. He said to them, "How many loaves do you have? Go see."When they knew, they said, "Five, and two fish. 6.39. He commanded them that everyone should sit down in groups on the green grass. 6.40. They sat down in ranks, by hundreds and by fifties. 6.41. He took the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, he blessed and broke the loaves, and he gave to his disciples to set before them, and he divided the two fish among them all. 6.42. They all ate, and were filled. 6.43. They took up twelve baskets full of broken pieces and also of the fish. 6.44. Those who ate the loaves were five thousand men. 6.45. Immediately he made his disciples get into the boat, and to go ahead to the other side, to Bethsaida, while he himself sent the multitude away. 6.46. After he had taken leave of them, he went up the mountain to pray. 6.47. When evening had come, the boat was in the midst of the sea, and he was alone on the land. 6.48. Seeing them distressed in rowing, for the wind was contrary to them, about the fourth watch of the night he came to them, walking on the sea, and he would have passed by them 6.49. but they, when they saw him walking on the sea, supposed that it was a ghost, and cried out; 6.50. for they all saw him, and were troubled. But he immediately spoke with them, and said to them, "Cheer up! It is I! Don't be afraid. 6.51. He got into the boat with them; and the wind ceased, and they were very amazed among themselves, and marveled; 6.52. for they hadn't understood about the loaves, but their hearts were hardened. 10.33. Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem. The Son of Man will be delivered to the chief priests and the scribes. They will condemn him to death, and will deliver him to the Gentiles. 10.46. They came to Jericho. As he went out from Jericho, with his disciples and a great multitude, the son of Timaeus, Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the road. 10.47. When he heard that it was Jesus the Nazarene, he began to cry out, and say, "Jesus, you son of David, have mercy on me! 10.48. Many rebuked him, that he should be quiet, but he cried out much more, "You son of David, have mercy on me! 10.49. Jesus stood still, and said, "Call him."They called the blind man, saying to him, "Cheer up! Get up. He is calling you! 10.50. He, casting away his cloak, sprang up, and came to Jesus. 10.51. Jesus asked him, "What do you want me to do for you?"The blind man said to him, "Rhabboni, that I may see again. 10.52. Jesus said to him, "Go your way. Your faith has made you well." Immediately he received his sight, and followed Jesus in the way. 15.1. Immediately in the morning the chief priests, with the elders and scribes, and the whole council, held a consultation, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered him up to Pilate.
20. New Testament, Matthew, 27.3-27.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27.3. Then Judas, who betrayed him, when he saw that Jesus was condemned, felt remorse, and brought back the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders 27.4. saying, "I have sinned in that I betrayed innocent blood."But they said, "What is that to us? You see to it. 27.5. He threw down the pieces of silver in the sanctuary, and departed. He went away and hanged himself. 27.6. The chief priests took the pieces of silver, and said, "It's not lawful to put them into the treasury, since it is the price of blood. 27.7. They took counsel, and bought the potter's field with them, to bury strangers in. 27.8. Therefore that field was called "The Field of Blood" to this day. 27.9. Then that which was spoken through Jeremiah the prophet was fulfilled, saying, "They took the thirty pieces of silver, The price of him upon whom a price had been set, Whom some of the children of Israel priced 27.10. And they gave them for the potter's field, As the Lord commanded me.
21. Tacitus, Histories, 5.5.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.23.3-2.23.18, 3.11, 6.39.2 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.23.3. The manner of James' death has been already indicated by the above-quoted words of Clement, who records that he was thrown from the pinnacle of the temple, and was beaten to death with a club. But Hegesippus, who lived immediately after the apostles, gives the most accurate account in the fifth book of his Memoirs. He writes as follows: 2.23.4. James, the brother of the Lord, succeeded to the government of the Church in conjunction with the apostles. He has been called the Just by all from the time of our Saviour to the present day; for there were many that bore the name of James. 2.23.5. He was holy from his mother's womb; and he drank no wine nor strong drink, nor did he eat flesh. No razor came upon his head; he did not anoint himself with oil, and he did not use the bath. 2.23.6. He alone was permitted to enter into the holy place; for he wore not woolen but linen garments. And he was in the habit of entering alone into the temple, and was frequently found upon his knees begging forgiveness for the people, so that his knees became hard like those of a camel, in consequence of his constantly bending them in his worship of God, and asking forgiveness for the people. 2.23.7. Because of his exceeding great justice he was called the Just, and Oblias, which signifies in Greek, 'Bulwark of the people' and 'Justice,' in accordance with what the prophets declare concerning him. 2.23.8. Now some of the seven sects, which existed among the people and which have been mentioned by me in the Memoirs, asked him, 'What is the gate of Jesus?' and he replied that he was the Saviour. 2.23.9. On account of these words some believed that Jesus is the Christ. But the sects mentioned above did not believe either in a resurrection or in one's coming to give to every man according to his works. But as many as believed did so on account of James. 2.23.10. Therefore when many even of the rulers believed, there was a commotion among the Jews and Scribes and Pharisees, who said that there was danger that the whole people would be looking for Jesus as the Christ. Coming therefore in a body to James they said, 'We entreat you, restrain the people; for they are gone astray in regard to Jesus, as if he were the Christ. We entreat you to persuade all that have come to the feast of the Passover concerning Jesus; for we all have confidence in you. For we bear you witness, as do all the people, that you are just, and do not respect persons. 2.23.11. Therefore, persuade the multitude not to be led astray concerning Jesus. For the whole people, and all of us also, have confidence in you. Stand therefore upon the pinnacle of the temple, that from that high position you may be clearly seen, and that your words may be readily heard by all the people. For all the tribes, with the Gentiles also, have come together on account of the Passover.' 2.23.12. The aforesaid Scribes and Pharisees therefore placed James upon the pinnacle of the temple, and cried out to him and said: 'You just one, in whom we ought all to have confidence, forasmuch as the people are led astray after Jesus, the crucified one, declare to us, what is the gate of Jesus.' 2.23.13. And he answered with a loud voice, 'Why do you ask me concerning Jesus, the Son of Man? He himself sits in heaven at the right hand of the great Power, and is about to come upon the clouds of heaven.' 2.23.14. And when many were fully convinced and gloried in the testimony of James, and said, 'Hosanna to the Son of David,' these same Scribes and Pharisees said again to one another, 'We have done badly in supplying such testimony to Jesus. But let us go up and throw him down, in order that they may be afraid to believe him.' 2.23.15. And they cried out, saying, 'Oh! Oh! The just man is also in error.' And they fulfilled the Scripture written in Isaiah, 'Let us take away the just man, because he is troublesome to us: therefore they shall eat the fruit of their doings.' 2.23.16. So they went up and threw down the just man, and said to each other, 'Let us stone James the Just.' And they began to stone him, for he was not killed by the fall; but he turned and knelt down and said, 'I entreat you, Lord God our Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.' 2.23.17. And while they were thus stoning him one of the priests of the sons of Rechab, the son of the Rechabites, who are mentioned by Jeremiah the prophet, cried out, saying, 'Stop. What are you doing? The just one prays for you.' 2.23.18. And one of them, who was a fuller, took the club with which he beat out clothes and struck the just man on the head. And thus he suffered martyrdom. And they buried him on the spot, by the temple, and his monument still remains by the temple. He became a true witness, both to Jews and Greeks, that Jesus is the Christ. And immediately Vespasian besieged them. 6.39.2. In Palestine, Alexander, bishop of the church of Jerusalem, was brought again on Christ's account before the governor's judgment seat in Caesarea, and having acquitted himself nobly in a second confession was cast into prison, crowned with the hoary locks of venerable age.
23. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 9.27.4, 9.27.23-9.27.25 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

24. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.46 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.46. And if you come to the books written after the time of Jesus, you will find that those multitudes of believers who hear the parables are, as it were, without, and worthy only of exoteric doctrines, while the disciples learn in private the explanation of the parables. For, privately, to His own disciples did Jesus open up all things, esteeming above the multitudes those who desired to know His wisdom. And He promises to those who believe upon Him to send them wise men and scribes, saying, Behold, I will send unto you wise men and scribes, and some of them they shall kill and crucify. And Paul also, in the catalogue of charismata bestowed by God, placed first the word of wisdom, and second, as being inferior to it, the word of knowledge, but third, and lower down, faith. And because he regarded the word as higher than miraculous powers, he for that reason places workings of miracles and gifts of healings in a lower place than the gifts of the word. And in the Acts of the Apostles Stephen bears witness to the great learning of Moses, which he had obtained wholly from ancient writings not accessible to the multitude. For he says: And Moses was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians. And therefore, with respect to his miracles, it was suspected that he wrought them perhaps, not in virtue of his professing to come from God, but by means of his Egyptian knowledge, in which he was well versed. For the king, entertaining such a suspicion, summoned the Egyptian magicians, and wise men, and enchanters, who were found to be of no avail as against the wisdom of Moses, which proved superior to all the wisdom of the Egyptians.
25. Augustine, De Genesi Contra Manichaeos Libri Duo, 2.24.37 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(artapanus),exposure as infant Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
(artapanus),teacher of orpheus (artapanus) Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
achaia Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
achilles Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
acts,anti-judaic tendency Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
acts,apostles,depiction of Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
acts,western text Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
acts and anti-judaism Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 61, 77
acts and racial discourse Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
agamemnon Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
agnes,depiction Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
agrippa i Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145
alexander (bishop of jerusalem) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
alexandria Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
andrew Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
andromache Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
antioch,peters speech in synagogue Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
antioch Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
apollo of bawit Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162
apollonius of rhodes Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
arcosolia Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
aretas Hellholm et al. (2010), Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity, 278
aristotle,on eagle,ark,baptismal significance of Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
arrest Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
artapanus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
asterius of amasea Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 27
augustine,influence on arator Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
augustine,on blood and water from christs side Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
baptismal significance,of ark Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
baptismal significance,of blood and water from christs side Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
baptismal significance,of peters side Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
baptismal significance,of red sea and crossing Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
baptismal significance,of wilderness miracles Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
bartimaeus Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
belief Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
born,reared,educated Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
bread Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
callimachus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
cappadocia Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 27
causes of corruption,theological concerns Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
christ Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
constantine i Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
constantinople Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
contribution,corinthian Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
cornelius Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
council of jerusalem Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 820
criteria in textual criticism,authors style Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
criteria in textual criticism,discourse analysis Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 85
death Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
decius Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
defenselessness Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
diaspora,judaism in the diaspora Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145
dionysus (dionysos) Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
disarmament rule Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
disciples of jesus Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
divine plan/βουλή Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 207
egeria Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
egypt,macdonald d. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
egypt,moses as teacher of orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
egypt,mosess miraculous prison escape Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
elder),macdonald,d. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
elder) Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
elijah-elisha typology Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 324
eusebius Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
example,of churches Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
expulsion of christians from synagogues Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145
ezekiel,tragedian,acts of apostles comparison Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
ezekiel,tragedian,greek tragedians influence Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
ezekiel,tragedian Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201, 203
feast,of james and john Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 27
festugière,andré-jean Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162
gaul Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
god,kingdom of Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
gold glass Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
gospel,of luke Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
hector Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
hecuba Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
hegesippus Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
hermes Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
herod Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 27
herod agrippa i Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
hierapolis Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
homer,acts of apostles comparison (macdonald) Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
homer Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
hymnody Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162
identity construction,along violent jew/merciful christian binary Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
imperial sociology Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 77
irenaeus,against heresies Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 132
james,the brother of jesus Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145
james,the brother of john Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145
james Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
james (son of alphaeus) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
james (the just or the brother of jesus) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
jerusalem,aelia Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
jerusalem,christians Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
jerusalem Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162; Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
jesus,death of Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
jesus,earliest followers,resurrection Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
jesus,execution of Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
jesus,lukan Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
jesus,teaching of,as teacher Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
john (son of zebedee,apostle) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 27
john the baptist Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
josephus,antiquities of the jews Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 132
judaism,acceptance of hellenism Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
judaism,cultural assimilation Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
judaism,mosess education Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
judaism,mosess exposure as infant Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
judaism and hellenism Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
judas,death of Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 324
junius bassus Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
laertes Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
lukes hermeneutic,brodie,t.l. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 324
lukes hermeneutic,elijah-elisha typology Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 324
macedonia Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
martyrdom Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 820
matthias,selection as apostle Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 324
matthias Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
mcroberts,s. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
minor,mosess education Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
mission Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
monastery (monastic) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
moses,egyptian education Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
nestor Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
nicomedia Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 27
odysseus Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
of jesus Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 207
oppression,political Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 820
orpheus,artapanus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
paul,and rome Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
paul,depiction Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
paul,martyrdom Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
paul,producing divisions Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 820
paul,st. Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162
paul Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
paul death of Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 61
penner,todd Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 61, 77
periodisation of history Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 207
persecution Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
peter,as cephas,and rome Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
peter,significance of side Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
peter,st. Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162
peter Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145; Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
peter (apostle),arrest Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
peter (apostle),crucifixion Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
peter (apostle),depiction Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
peter (apostle),water miracle Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
petrine topography Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
philip Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
philippi Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
philo of alexandria Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
pilgrimage (pilgrim),and constantinople,and martyr piety Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
pilgrimage (pilgrim),and constantinople Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
plato,acts of apostles comparison (macdonald) Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
plato Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
pola casket Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
politics,of luke/acts Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 207
polyphemus Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
poverty Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
priam Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
prison escape topos in ancient authors Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 201
prosper of aquitaine,on blood and water from christs side Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
pseudo-hippolytus Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
red sea,crossing of,baptismal significance of Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
relics,veneration Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6
sarcophagi Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 266
septuagint,lukes use Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 324
silas Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162; Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
simeon,homeric phrases Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
simeon,macdonald,d. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
simeon,mcroberts,s. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
simeon,use of homer Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
son,of god Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
stephen,anti-jewish symbol,as protomartyr Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 27
stephen Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 145
stephen and the hellenists Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
stephen historical existence of Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
stoning,significance of Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 77
suffering Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 207
sword Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
symeon (son of clopas) Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 6, 7
temple critique Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 13
temptation,of disciples Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
temptation Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
theodoret of cyrrhus,three chapters,controversy of Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 4
theodotus,collins,j.j. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
theodotus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
thessalonica Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
tiresias Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
trust Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 170
turnus Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
typology Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162
valens Mendez (2022), The Cult of Stephen in Jerusalem: Inventing a Patron Martyr, 7
vergil (virgil) Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375
vigilius,pope,and three chapters Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 4
vigilius,pope,wilderness miracles,baptismal significance of Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 176
ward,benedicta' Cain (2016), The Greek Historia Monachorum in Aegypto: Monastic Hagiography in the Late Fourth Century, 162
word/the word,preached Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 16
zeus Levine Allison and Crossan (2006), The Historical Jesus in Context, 375