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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8243
New Testament, Acts, 10.17


Ὡς δὲ ἐν ἑαυτῷ διηπόρει ὁ Πέτρος τί ἂν εἴη τὸ ὅραμα ὃ εἶδεν, ἰδοὺ οἱ ἄνδρες οἱ ἀπεσταλμένοι ὑπὸ τοῦ Κορνηλίου διερωτήσαντες τὴν οἰκίαν τοῦ Σίμωνος ἐπέστησαν ἐπὶ τὸν πυλῶναNow while Peter was very perplexed in himself what the vision which he had seen might mean, behold, the men who were sent by Cornelius, having made inquiry for Simon's house, stood before the gate


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 26.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

26.7. וַיִּשְׁאֲלוּ אַנְשֵׁי הַמָּקוֹם לְאִשְׁתּוֹ וַיֹּאמֶר אֲחֹתִי הִוא כִּי יָרֵא לֵאמֹר אִשְׁתִּי פֶּן־יַהַרְגֻנִי אַנְשֵׁי הַמָּקוֹם עַל־רִבְקָה כִּי־טוֹבַת מַרְאֶה הִיא׃ 26.7. And the men of the place asked him of his wife; and he said: ‘She is my sister’; for he feared to say: ‘My wife’; ‘lest the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah, because she is fair to look upon.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Job, 4.13 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.13. בִּשְׂעִפִּים מֵחֶזְיֹנוֹת לָיְלָה בִּנְפֹל תַּרְדֵּמָה עַל־אֲנָשִׁים׃ 4.13. In thoughts from the visions of the night, When deep sleep falleth on men,"
3. Hebrew Bible, Joel, 2.28-2.32, 3.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1. וְהָיָה אַחֲרֵי־כֵן אֶשְׁפּוֹךְ אֶת־רוּחִי עַל־כָּל־בָּשָׂר וְנִבְּאוּ בְּנֵיכֶם וּבְנוֹתֵיכֶם זִקְנֵיכֶם חֲלֹמוֹת יַחֲלֹמוּן בַּחוּרֵיכֶם חֶזְיֹנוֹת יִרְאוּ׃ 3.1. And it shall come to pass afterward, That I will pour out My spirit upon all flesh; And your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, Your old men shall dream dreams, Your young men shall see visions;"
4. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 11.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

11.3. כֹּל מַפְרֶסֶת פַּרְסָה וְשֹׁסַעַת שֶׁסַע פְּרָסֹת מַעֲלַת גֵּרָה בַּבְּהֵמָה אֹתָהּ תֹּאכֵלוּ׃ 11.3. וְהָאֲנָקָה וְהַכֹּחַ וְהַלְּטָאָה וְהַחֹמֶט וְהַתִּנְשָׁמֶת׃ 11.3. Whatsoever parteth the hoof, and is wholly cloven-footed, and cheweth the cud, among the beasts, that may ye eat."
5. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 10.4, 11.4 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10.4. רָשָׁע כְּגֹבַהּ אַפּוֹ בַּל־יִדְרֹשׁ אֵין אֱלֹהִים כָּל־מְזִמּוֹתָיו׃ 11.4. יְהוָה בְּהֵיכַל קָדְשׁוֹ יְהוָה בַּשָּׁמַיִם כִּסְאוֹ עֵינָיו יֶחֱזוּ עַפְעַפָּיו יִבְחֲנוּ בְּנֵי אָדָם׃ 10.4. The wicked, in the pride of his countece [, saith]: 'He will not require'; All his thoughts are: 'There is no God.'" 11.4. The LORD is in His holy temple, the LORD, His throne is in heaven; His eyes behold, His eyelids try, the children of men."
6. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 56.10 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

56.10. His watchmen are all blind, Without knowledge; They are all dumb dogs, They cannot bark; Raving, lying down, loving to slumber."
7. Homer, Iliad, 3.385-3.440, 5.724-5.725, 18.168, 18.203, 19.13-19.19 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.385. /Then with her hand the goddess laid hold of her fragrant robe, and plucked it, and spake to her in the likeness of an ancient dame, a wool-comber, who had been wont to card the fair wool for her when she dwelt in Lacedaemon, and who was well loved of her; in her likeness fair Aphrodite spake: 3.386. /Then with her hand the goddess laid hold of her fragrant robe, and plucked it, and spake to her in the likeness of an ancient dame, a wool-comber, who had been wont to card the fair wool for her when she dwelt in Lacedaemon, and who was well loved of her; in her likeness fair Aphrodite spake: 3.387. /Then with her hand the goddess laid hold of her fragrant robe, and plucked it, and spake to her in the likeness of an ancient dame, a wool-comber, who had been wont to card the fair wool for her when she dwelt in Lacedaemon, and who was well loved of her; in her likeness fair Aphrodite spake: 3.388. /Then with her hand the goddess laid hold of her fragrant robe, and plucked it, and spake to her in the likeness of an ancient dame, a wool-comber, who had been wont to card the fair wool for her when she dwelt in Lacedaemon, and who was well loved of her; in her likeness fair Aphrodite spake: 3.389. /Then with her hand the goddess laid hold of her fragrant robe, and plucked it, and spake to her in the likeness of an ancient dame, a wool-comber, who had been wont to card the fair wool for her when she dwelt in Lacedaemon, and who was well loved of her; in her likeness fair Aphrodite spake: 3.390. / Come hither; Alexander calleth thee to go to thy home. There is he in his chamber and on his inlaid couch, gleaming with beauty and fair raiment. Thou wouldest not deem that he had come thither from warring with a foe, but rather that he was going to the dance, or sat there as one that had but newly ceased from the dance. 3.391. / Come hither; Alexander calleth thee to go to thy home. There is he in his chamber and on his inlaid couch, gleaming with beauty and fair raiment. Thou wouldest not deem that he had come thither from warring with a foe, but rather that he was going to the dance, or sat there as one that had but newly ceased from the dance. 3.392. / Come hither; Alexander calleth thee to go to thy home. There is he in his chamber and on his inlaid couch, gleaming with beauty and fair raiment. Thou wouldest not deem that he had come thither from warring with a foe, but rather that he was going to the dance, or sat there as one that had but newly ceased from the dance. 3.393. / Come hither; Alexander calleth thee to go to thy home. There is he in his chamber and on his inlaid couch, gleaming with beauty and fair raiment. Thou wouldest not deem that he had come thither from warring with a foe, but rather that he was going to the dance, or sat there as one that had but newly ceased from the dance. 3.394. / Come hither; Alexander calleth thee to go to thy home. There is he in his chamber and on his inlaid couch, gleaming with beauty and fair raiment. Thou wouldest not deem that he had come thither from warring with a foe, but rather that he was going to the dance, or sat there as one that had but newly ceased from the dance. 3.395. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.396. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.397. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.398. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.399. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.400. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.401. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.402. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.403. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.404. /Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. 3.405. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.406. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.407. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.408. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.409. /It is for this cause that thou art now come hither with guileful thought. Go thou, and sit by his side, and depart from the way of the gods, neither let thy feet any more bear thee back to Olympus; but ever be thou troubled for him, and guard him, until he make thee his wife, or haply his slave. 3.410. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.411. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.412. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.413. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.414. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.415. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.416. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.417. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.418. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.419. /and hate thee, even as now I love thee wondrously; and lest I devise grievous hatred between both, Trojans alike and Danaans; then wouldst thou perish of an evil fate. So spake she, and Helen, sprung from Zeus, was seized with fear; and she went, wrapping herself in her bright shining mantle 3.420. /in silence; and she was unseen of the Trojan women; and the goddess led the way. 3.421. /in silence; and she was unseen of the Trojan women; and the goddess led the way. 3.422. /in silence; and she was unseen of the Trojan women; and the goddess led the way. 3.423. /in silence; and she was unseen of the Trojan women; and the goddess led the way. 3.424. /in silence; and she was unseen of the Trojan women; and the goddess led the way. Now when they were come to the beautiful palace of Alexander, the handmaids turned forthwith to their tasks, but she, the fair lady, went to the high-roofed chamber. And the goddess, laughter-loving Aphrodite, took for her a chair 3.425. /and set it before the face of Alexander. Thereon Helen sate her down, the daughter of Zeus that beareth the aegis, with eyes turned askance; and she chid her lord, and said:Thou hast come back from the war; would thou hadst perished there, vanquished by a valiant man that was my former lord. 3.426. /and set it before the face of Alexander. Thereon Helen sate her down, the daughter of Zeus that beareth the aegis, with eyes turned askance; and she chid her lord, and said:Thou hast come back from the war; would thou hadst perished there, vanquished by a valiant man that was my former lord. 3.427. /and set it before the face of Alexander. Thereon Helen sate her down, the daughter of Zeus that beareth the aegis, with eyes turned askance; and she chid her lord, and said:Thou hast come back from the war; would thou hadst perished there, vanquished by a valiant man that was my former lord. 3.428. /and set it before the face of Alexander. Thereon Helen sate her down, the daughter of Zeus that beareth the aegis, with eyes turned askance; and she chid her lord, and said:Thou hast come back from the war; would thou hadst perished there, vanquished by a valiant man that was my former lord. 3.429. /and set it before the face of Alexander. Thereon Helen sate her down, the daughter of Zeus that beareth the aegis, with eyes turned askance; and she chid her lord, and said:Thou hast come back from the war; would thou hadst perished there, vanquished by a valiant man that was my former lord. 3.430. /Verily it was thy boast aforetime that thou wast a better man than Menelaus, dear to Ares, in the might of thy hands and with thy spear. But go now, challenge Menelaus, dear to Ares, again to do battle with thee, man to man. But, nay, I of myself bid thee refrain, and not war amain against fair-haired Menelaus 3.431. /Verily it was thy boast aforetime that thou wast a better man than Menelaus, dear to Ares, in the might of thy hands and with thy spear. But go now, challenge Menelaus, dear to Ares, again to do battle with thee, man to man. But, nay, I of myself bid thee refrain, and not war amain against fair-haired Menelaus 3.432. /Verily it was thy boast aforetime that thou wast a better man than Menelaus, dear to Ares, in the might of thy hands and with thy spear. But go now, challenge Menelaus, dear to Ares, again to do battle with thee, man to man. But, nay, I of myself bid thee refrain, and not war amain against fair-haired Menelaus 3.433. /Verily it was thy boast aforetime that thou wast a better man than Menelaus, dear to Ares, in the might of thy hands and with thy spear. But go now, challenge Menelaus, dear to Ares, again to do battle with thee, man to man. But, nay, I of myself bid thee refrain, and not war amain against fair-haired Menelaus 3.434. /Verily it was thy boast aforetime that thou wast a better man than Menelaus, dear to Ares, in the might of thy hands and with thy spear. But go now, challenge Menelaus, dear to Ares, again to do battle with thee, man to man. But, nay, I of myself bid thee refrain, and not war amain against fair-haired Menelaus 3.435. /nor fight with him in thy folly, lest haply thou be vanquished anon by his spear. Then Paris made answer, and spake to her, saying:Chide not my heart, lady, with hard words of reviling. For this present hath Menelaus vanquished me with Athene's aid 3.436. /nor fight with him in thy folly, lest haply thou be vanquished anon by his spear. Then Paris made answer, and spake to her, saying:Chide not my heart, lady, with hard words of reviling. For this present hath Menelaus vanquished me with Athene's aid 3.437. /nor fight with him in thy folly, lest haply thou be vanquished anon by his spear. Then Paris made answer, and spake to her, saying:Chide not my heart, lady, with hard words of reviling. For this present hath Menelaus vanquished me with Athene's aid 3.438. /nor fight with him in thy folly, lest haply thou be vanquished anon by his spear. Then Paris made answer, and spake to her, saying:Chide not my heart, lady, with hard words of reviling. For this present hath Menelaus vanquished me with Athene's aid 3.439. /nor fight with him in thy folly, lest haply thou be vanquished anon by his spear. Then Paris made answer, and spake to her, saying:Chide not my heart, lady, with hard words of reviling. For this present hath Menelaus vanquished me with Athene's aid 3.440. /but another time shall I vanquish him; on our side too there be gods. But come, let us take our joy, couched together in love; for never yet hath desire so encompassed my soul—nay, not when at the first I snatched thee from lovely Lacedaemon and sailed with thee on my seafaring ships 5.724. /Then Hera, the queenly goddess, daughter of great Cronos, went to and fro harnessing the horses of golden frontlets. and Hebe quickly put to the car on either side the curved wheels of bronze, eight-spoked, about the iron axle-tree. of these the felloe verily is of gold imperishable 5.725. /and thereover are tires of bronze fitted, a marvel to behold; and the naves are of silver, revolving on this side and on that; and the body is plaited tight with gold and silver thongs, and two rims there are that run about it. From the body stood forth the pole of silver, and on the end 18.168. /And now would he have dragged away the body, and have won glory unspeakable, had not wind-footed, swift Iris speeding from Olympus with a message that he array him for battle, come to the son of Peleus, all unknown of Zeus and the other gods, for Hera sent her forth. And she drew nigh, and spake to him winged words: 19.13. /But receive thou from Hephaestus glorious armour, exceeding fair, such as never yet a man bare upon his shoulders. So saying the goddess set down the arms in front of Achilles, and they all rang aloud in their splendour. Then trembling seized all the Myrmidons 19.14. /But receive thou from Hephaestus glorious armour, exceeding fair, such as never yet a man bare upon his shoulders. So saying the goddess set down the arms in front of Achilles, and they all rang aloud in their splendour. Then trembling seized all the Myrmidons 19.15. /neither dared any man to look thereon, but they shrank in fear. Howbeit, when Achilles saw the arms, then came wrath upon him yet the more, and his eyes blazed forth in terrible wise from beneath their lids, as it had been flame; and he was glad as he held in his arms the glorious gifts of the god. But when in his soul he had taken delight in gazing on the glory of them 19.16. /neither dared any man to look thereon, but they shrank in fear. Howbeit, when Achilles saw the arms, then came wrath upon him yet the more, and his eyes blazed forth in terrible wise from beneath their lids, as it had been flame; and he was glad as he held in his arms the glorious gifts of the god. But when in his soul he had taken delight in gazing on the glory of them 19.17. /neither dared any man to look thereon, but they shrank in fear. Howbeit, when Achilles saw the arms, then came wrath upon him yet the more, and his eyes blazed forth in terrible wise from beneath their lids, as it had been flame; and he was glad as he held in his arms the glorious gifts of the god. But when in his soul he had taken delight in gazing on the glory of them 19.18. /neither dared any man to look thereon, but they shrank in fear. Howbeit, when Achilles saw the arms, then came wrath upon him yet the more, and his eyes blazed forth in terrible wise from beneath their lids, as it had been flame; and he was glad as he held in his arms the glorious gifts of the god. But when in his soul he had taken delight in gazing on the glory of them 19.19. /neither dared any man to look thereon, but they shrank in fear. Howbeit, when Achilles saw the arms, then came wrath upon him yet the more, and his eyes blazed forth in terrible wise from beneath their lids, as it had been flame; and he was glad as he held in his arms the glorious gifts of the god. But when in his soul he had taken delight in gazing on the glory of them
8. Homer, Odyssey, 20.32 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1073-1223, 274, 1072 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1072. ὀτοτοτοῖ πόποι δᾶ. 1072. Otototoi, Gods, Earth, —
10. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 3.1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.1. וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלָי בֶּן־אָדָם אֶת־כָּל־דְּבָרַי אֲשֶׁר אֲדַבֵּר אֵלֶיךָ קַח בִּלְבָבְךָ וּבְאָזְנֶיךָ שְׁמָע׃ 3.1. וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלַי בֶּן־אָדָם אֵת אֲשֶׁר־תִּמְצָא אֱכוֹל אֱכוֹל אֶת־הַמְּגִלָּה הַזֹּאת וְלֵךְ דַּבֵּר אֶל־בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 3.1. And He said unto me: ‘Son of man, eat that which thou findest; eat this roll, and go, speak unto the house of Israel.’"
11. Euripides, Rhesus, 781-789, 780 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Herodotus, Histories, 1.39, 1.158-1.160, 6.69 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.39. “Father,” the youth replied, “no one can blame you for keeping guard over me, when you have seen such a vision; but it is my right to show you what you do not perceive, and why you mistake the meaning of the dream. ,You say that the dream told you that I should be killed by a spear of iron? But has a boar hands? Has it that iron spear which you dread? Had the dream said I should be killed by a tusk or some other thing proper to a boar, you would be right in acting as you act; but no, it was to be by a spear. Therefore, since it is not against men that we are to fight, let me go.” 1.158. The men of Cyme, then, sent to Branchidae to inquire of the shrine what they should do in the matter of Pactyes that would be most pleasing to the gods; and the oracle replied that they must surrender Pactyes to the Persians. ,When this answer came back to them, they set about surrendering him. But while the greater part were in favor of doing this, Aristodicus son of Heraclides, a notable man among the citizens, stopped the men of Cyme from doing it; for he did not believe the oracle and thought that those who had inquired of the god spoke falsely; until at last a second band of inquirers was sent to inquire concerning Pactyes, among whom was Aristodicus. 1.159. When they came to Branchidae, Aristodicus, speaking for all, put this question to the oracle: “Lord, Pactyes the Lydian has come to us a suppliant fleeing a violent death at the hands of the Persians; and they demand him of us, telling the men of Cyme to surrender him. ,But we, as much as we fear the Persian power, have not dared give up this suppliant of ours until it is clearly made known to us by you whether we are to do this or not.” Thus Aristodicus inquired; and the god again gave the same answer, that Pactyes should be surrendered to the Persians. ,With that Aristodicus did as he had already decided; he went around the temple, and took away the sparrows and all the families of nesting birds that were in it. But while he was doing so, a voice (they say) came out of the inner shrine calling to Aristodicus, and saying, “Vilest of men, how dare you do this? Will you rob my temple of those that take refuge with me?” ,Then Aristodicus had his answer ready: “Lord,” he said, “will you save your own suppliants, yet tell the men of Cyme to deliver up theirs?” But the god replied, “Yes, I do command them, so that you may perish all the sooner for your impiety, and never again come to inquire of my oracle about giving up those that seek refuge with you.” 1.160. When the Cymaeans heard this answer, they sent Pactyes away to Mytilene ; for they were anxious not to perish for delivering him up or to be besieged for keeping him with them. ,Then Mazares sent a message to Mytilene demanding the surrender of Pactyes, and the Mytilenaeans prepared to give him, for a price; I cannot say exactly how much it was, for the bargain was never fulfilled; ,for when the Cymaeans learned what the Mytilenaeans were about, they sent a ship to Lesbos and took Pactyes away to Chios . From there he was dragged out of the temple of City-guarding Athena and delivered up by the Chians, ,who received in return Atarneus, which is a district in Mysia opposite Lesbos . The Persians thus received Pactyes and kept him guarded, so that they might show him to Cyrus; ,and for a long time no one would use barley meal from this land of Atarneus in sacrifices to any god, or make sacrificial cakes of what grew there; everything that came from that country was kept away from any sacred rite. 6.69. Thus he spoke. His mother answered, “My son, since you adjure me by entreaties to speak the truth, I will speak out to you all that is true. On the third night after Ariston brought me to his house, a phantom resembling him came to me. It came and lay with me and then put on me the garlands which it had. ,It went away, and when Ariston came in later and saw me with the garlands, he asked who gave them to me. I said he did, but he denied it. I swore an oath that just a little while before he had come in and lain with me and given me the garlands, and I said it was not good of him to deny it. ,When he saw me swearing, he perceived that this was some divine affair. For the garlands had clearly come from the hero's precinct which is established at the courtyard doors, which they call the precinct of Astrabacus, and the seers responded that this was the same hero who had come to me. Thus, my son, you have all you want to know. ,Either you are from this hero and Astrabacus the hero is your father, or Ariston is, for I conceived you that night. As for how your enemies chiefly attack you, saying that Ariston himself, when your birth was announced, denied in front of a large audience that you were his because the ten months had not yet been completed, he spoke an idle word, out of ignorance of such things. ,Some women give birth after nine months or seven months; not all complete the ten months. I gave birth to you, my son, after seven months. A little later Ariston himself recognized that he had blurted out that speech because of foolishness. Do not believe other stories about your manner of birth. You have heard the whole truth. May the wife of Leotychides himself, and the wives of the others who say these things, give birth to children fathered by ass-keepers.”
13. Sophocles, Electra, 644 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 4.3.8 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.3.8. That day and night, accordingly, they remained there, in great perplexity. But Xenophon had a dream; he thought that he was bound in fetters, but that the fetters fell off from him of their own accord, so that he was released and could take as long steps διαβαίνειν, which also means to cross a river (see above). Here lay the good omen of the dream. as he pleased. When dawn came, he went to Cheirisophus, told him he had hopes that all would be well, and related to him his dream.
15. Cicero, On Divination, 1.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.23. Quid? quaeris, Carneades, cur haec ita fiant aut qua arte perspici possint? Nescire me fateor, evenire autem te ipsum dico videre. Casu, inquis. Itane vero? quicquam potest casu esse factum, quod omnes habet in se numeros veritatis? Quattuor tali iacti casu Venerium efficiunt; num etiam centum Venerios, si quadringentos talos ieceris, casu futuros putas? Aspersa temere pigmenta in tabula oris liniamenta efficere possunt; num etiam Veneris Coae pulchritudinem effici posse aspersione fortuita putas? Sus rostro si humi A litteram inpresserit, num propterea suspicari poteris Andromacham Ennii ab ea posse describi? Fingebat Carneades in Chiorum lapicidinis saxo diffisso caput extitisse Panisci; credo, aliquam non dissimilem figuram, sed certe non talem, ut eam factam a Scopa diceres. Sic enim se profecto res habet, ut numquam perfecte veritatem casus imitetur. 1.23. But what? You ask, Carneades, do you, why these things so happen, or by what rules they may be understood? I confess that I do not know, but that they do so fall out I assert that you yourself see. Mere accidents, you say. Now, really, is that so? Can anything be an accident which bears upon itself every mark of truth? Four dice are cast and a Venus throw results — that is chance; but do you think it would be chance, too, if in one hundred casts you made one hundred Venus throws? It is possible for paints flung at random on a canvasc to form the outlines of a face; but do you imagine that an accidental scattering of pigments could produce the beautiful portrait of Venus of Cos? Suppose that a hog should form the letter A on the ground with its snout; is that a reason for believing that it would write out Enniuss poem The Andromache?Carneades used to have a story that once in the Chian quarries when a stone was split open there appeared the head of the infant god Pan; I grant that the figure may have borne some resemblance to the god, but assuredly the resemblance was not such that you could ascribe the work to a Scopas. For it is undeniably true that no perfect imitation of a thing was ever made by chance. [14]
16. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 9.21, 9.23-9.27, 10.7-10.8, 10.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

9.21. וְעוֹד אֲנִי מְדַבֵּר בַּתְּפִלָּה וְהָאִישׁ גַּבְרִיאֵל אֲשֶׁר רָאִיתִי בֶחָזוֹן בַּתְּחִלָּה מֻעָף בִּיעָף נֹגֵעַ אֵלַי כְּעֵת מִנְחַת־עָרֶב׃ 9.23. בִּתְחִלַּת תַּחֲנוּנֶיךָ יָצָא דָבָר וַאֲנִי בָּאתִי לְהַגִּיד כִּי חֲמוּדוֹת אָתָּה וּבִין בַּדָּבָר וְהָבֵן בַּמַּרְאֶה׃ 9.24. שָׁבֻעִים שִׁבְעִים נֶחְתַּךְ עַל־עַמְּךָ וְעַל־עִיר קָדְשֶׁךָ לְכַלֵּא הַפֶּשַׁע ולחתם [וּלְהָתֵם] חטאות [חַטָּאת] וּלְכַפֵּר עָוֺן וּלְהָבִיא צֶדֶק עֹלָמִים וְלַחְתֹּם חָזוֹן וְנָבִיא וְלִמְשֹׁחַ קֹדֶשׁ קָדָשִׁים׃ 9.25. וְתֵדַע וְתַשְׂכֵּל מִן־מֹצָא דָבָר לְהָשִׁיב וְלִבְנוֹת יְרוּשָׁלִַם עַד־מָשִׁיחַ נָגִיד שָׁבֻעִים שִׁבְעָה וְשָׁבֻעִים שִׁשִּׁים וּשְׁנַיִם תָּשׁוּב וְנִבְנְתָה רְחוֹב וְחָרוּץ וּבְצוֹק הָעִתִּים׃ 9.26. וְאַחֲרֵי הַשָּׁבֻעִים שִׁשִּׁים וּשְׁנַיִם יִכָּרֵת מָשִׁיחַ וְאֵין לוֹ וְהָעִיר וְהַקֹּדֶשׁ יַשְׁחִית עַם נָגִיד הַבָּא וְקִצּוֹ בַשֶּׁטֶף וְעַד קֵץ מִלְחָמָה נֶחֱרֶצֶת שֹׁמֵמוֹת׃ 9.27. וְהִגְבִּיר בְּרִית לָרַבִּים שָׁבוּעַ אֶחָד וַחֲצִי הַשָּׁבוּעַ יַשְׁבִּית זֶבַח וּמִנְחָה וְעַל כְּנַף שִׁקּוּצִים מְשֹׁמֵם וְעַד־כָּלָה וְנֶחֱרָצָה תִּתַּךְ עַל־שֹׁמֵם׃ 10.7. וְרָאִיתִי אֲנִי דָנִיֵּאל לְבַדִּי אֶת־הַמַּרְאָה וְהָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר הָיוּ עִמִּי לֹא רָאוּ אֶת־הַמַּרְאָה אֲבָל חֲרָדָה גְדֹלָה נָפְלָה עֲלֵיהֶם וַיִּבְרְחוּ בְּהֵחָבֵא׃ 10.8. וַאֲנִי נִשְׁאַרְתִּי לְבַדִּי וָאֶרְאֶה אֶת־הַמַּרְאָה הַגְּדֹלָה הַזֹּאת וְלֹא נִשְׁאַר־בִּי כֹּח וְהוֹדִי נֶהְפַּךְ עָלַי לְמַשְׁחִית וְלֹא עָצַרְתִּי כֹּחַ׃ 10.16. וְהִנֵּה כִּדְמוּת בְּנֵי אָדָם נֹגֵעַ עַל־שְׂפָתָי וָאֶפְתַּח־פִּי וָאֲדַבְּרָה וָאֹמְרָה אֶל־הָעֹמֵד לְנֶגְדִּי אֲדֹנִי בַּמַּרְאָה נֶהֶפְכוּ צִירַי עָלַי וְלֹא עָצַרְתִּי כֹּחַ׃ 9.21. yea, while I was speaking in prayer, the man Gabriel, whom I had seen in the vision at the beginning, being caused to fly swiftly, approached close to me about the time of the evening offering." 9.23. At the beginning of thy supplications a word went forth, and I am come to declare it; for thou art greatly beloved; therefore look into the word, and understand the vision." 9.24. Seventy weeks are decreed upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sin, and to forgive iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal vision and prophet, and to anoint the most holy place." 9.25. Know therefore and discern, that from the going forth of the word to restore and to build Jerusalem unto one anointed, a prince, shall be seven weeks; and for threescore and two weeks, it shall be built again, with broad place and moat, but in troublous times." 9.26. And after the threescore and two weeks shall an anointed one be cut off, and be no more; and the people of a prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; but his end shall be with a flood; and unto the end of the war desolations are determined." 9.27. And he shall make a firm covet with many for one week; and for half of the week he shall cause the sacrifice and the offering to cease; and upon the wing of detestable things shall be that which causeth appalment; and that until the extermination wholly determined be poured out upon that which causeth appalment.’" 10.7. And I Daniel alone saw the vision; for the men that were with me saw not the vision; howbeit a great trembling fell upon them, and they fled to hide themselves." 10.8. So that I was left alone, and saw this great vision, and there remained no strength in me; for my comeliness was turned in me into corruption, and I retained no strength." 10.16. And, behold, one like the similitude of the sons of men touched my lips; then I opened my mouth, and spoke and said unto him that stood before me: ‘O my lord, by reason of the vision my pains are come upon me, and I retain no strength."
17. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 4.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 3.6-3.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.6. For of these are those who creep into houses, and take captive gullible women loaded down with sins, led away by various lusts 3.7. always learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth.
19. New Testament, Acts, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.11, 1.15, 1.16, 1.17, 1.18, 1.19, 1.20, 1.21, 1.22, 1.23, 1.24, 1.25, 1.26, 2.17, 2.18, 2.19, 2.20, 2.21, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 3.10, 3.20, 3.21, 4.30, 5.12, 5.15, 6.7, 7.31, 7.55, 7.56, 8, 8.9, 8.10, 8.11, 8.12, 8.13, 8.14, 8.15, 8.16, 8.17, 8.18, 8.19, 8.20, 8.21, 8.22, 8.23, 8.24, 8.26, 8.27, 8.28, 8.29, 8.30, 8.31, 8.32, 8.33, 8.34, 8.35, 8.36, 8.37, 8.38, 8.39, 8.40, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7, 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14, 9.15, 9.16, 10, 10.1, 10.1-11.18, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.9, 10.10, 10.11, 10.12, 10.13, 10.14, 10.15, 10.16, 10.18, 10.19, 10.20, 10.21, 10.22, 10.23, 10.24, 10.25, 10.26, 10.27, 10.28, 10.29, 10.30, 10.31, 10.32, 10.33, 10.34, 10.35, 10.36, 10.37, 10.38, 10.39, 10.40, 10.41, 10.42, 10.43, 10.44, 10.45, 10.46, 10.47, 10.48, 11.5, 11.17, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.6, 12.7, 12.8, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.12, 12.13, 12.14, 12.15, 12.16, 12.17, 13.4, 13.5, 13.6, 13.7, 13.8, 13.9, 13.10, 13.11, 13.12, 15.7, 15.8, 15.9, 16.9, 16.10, 16.14, 16.15, 17.3, 17.12, 17.31, 18.8, 18.9, 19.1, 19.2, 19.3, 19.4, 19.5, 19.6, 19.7, 20.17, 20.18, 20.19, 20.20, 20.21, 20.22, 20.23, 20.24, 20.25, 20.26, 20.27, 20.28, 20.29, 20.30, 20.31, 20.32, 20.33, 20.34, 20.35, 20.36, 20.37, 20.38, 22.17, 22.18, 22.19, 22.20, 22.21, 26.19, 27.21, 27.22, 27.23, 27.24, 27.25, 27.26, 27.43 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.11. who also said, "You men of Galilee, why do you stand looking into the sky? This Jesus, who was received up from you into the sky will come back in the same way as you saw him going into the sky.
20. New Testament, John, 13.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13.24. Simon Peter therefore beckoned to him, and said to him, "Tell us who it is of whom he speaks.
21. New Testament, Luke, 1.5-1.38, 1.68-1.79, 2.26, 2.36-2.38, 8.2-8.4, 8.9, 9.28-9.36, 12.37, 13.22, 13.27-13.28, 15.26, 15.32, 17.26-17.27, 17.33-17.34, 19.43-19.44, 20.42-20.44, 21.27, 24.23, 24.37 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.5. There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the priestly division of Abijah. He had a wife of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. 1.6. They were both righteous before God, walking blamelessly in all the commandments and ordices of the Lord. 1.7. But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and they both were well advanced in years. 1.8. Now it happened, while he executed the priest's office before God in the order of his division 1.9. according to the custom of the priest's office, his lot was to enter into the temple of the Lord and burn incense. 1.10. The whole multitude of the people were praying outside at the hour of incense. 1.11. An angel of the Lord appeared to him, standing on the right side of the altar of incense. 1.12. Zacharias was troubled when he saw him, and fear fell upon him. 1.13. But the angel said to him, "Don't be afraid, Zacharias, because your request has been heard, and your wife, Elizabeth, will bear you a son, and you shall call his name John. 1.14. You will have joy and gladness; and many will rejoice at his birth. 1.15. For he will be great in the sight of the Lord, and he will drink no wine nor strong drink. He will be filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mother's womb. 1.16. He will turn many of the children of Israel to the Lord, their God. 1.17. He will go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah, 'to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children,' and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord. 1.18. Zacharias said to the angel, "How can I be sure of this? For I am an old man, and my wife is well advanced in years. 1.19. The angel answered him, "I am Gabriel, who stands in the presence of God. I was sent to speak to you, and to bring you this good news. 1.20. Behold, you will be silent and not able to speak, until the day that these things will happen, because you didn't believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their proper time. 1.21. The people were waiting for Zacharias, and they marveled that he delayed in the temple. 1.22. When he came out, he could not speak to them, and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple. He continued making signs to them, and remained mute. 1.23. It happened, when the days of his service were fulfilled, he departed to his house. 1.24. After these days Elizabeth, his wife, conceived, and she hid herself five months, saying 1.25. Thus has the Lord done to me in the days in which he looked at me, to take away my reproach among men. 1.26. Now in the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was sent from God to a city of Galilee, named Nazareth 1.27. to a virgin pledged to be married to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David. The virgin's name was Mary. 1.28. Having come in, the angel said to her, "Rejoice, you highly favored one! The Lord is with you. Blessed are you among women! 1.29. But when she saw him, she was greatly troubled at the saying, and considered what kind of salutation this might be. 1.30. The angel said to her, "Don't be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. 1.31. Behold, you will conceive in your womb, and bring forth a son, and will call his name 'Jesus.' 1.32. He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his father, David 1.33. and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever. There will be no end to his kingdom. 1.34. Mary said to the angel, "How can this be, seeing I am a virgin? 1.35. The angel answered her, "The Holy Spirit will come on you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. Therefore also the holy one who is born from you will be called the Son of God. 1.36. Behold, Elizabeth, your relative, also has conceived a son in her old age; and this is the sixth month with her who was called barren. 1.37. For everything spoken by God is possible. 1.38. Mary said, "Behold, the handmaid of the Lord; be it to me according to your word."The angel departed from her. 1.68. Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, For he has visited and worked redemption for his people; 1.69. And has raised up a horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David 1.70. (As he spoke by the mouth of his holy prophets who have been from of old) 1.71. Salvation from our enemies, and from the hand of all who hate us; 1.72. To show mercy towards our fathers, To remember his holy covet 1.73. The oath which he spoke to Abraham, our father 1.74. To grant to us that we, being delivered out of the hand of our enemies, should serve him without fear 1.75. In holiness and righteousness before him all the days of our life. 1.76. And you, child, will be called a prophet of the Most High, For you will go before the face of the Lord to make ready his ways 1.77. To give knowledge of salvation to his people by the remission of their sins 1.78. Because of the tender mercy of our God, Whereby the dawn from on high will visit us 1.79. To shine on those who sit in darkness and the shadow of death; To guide our feet into the way of peace. 2.26. It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he should not see death before he had seen the Lord's Christ. 2.36. There was one Anna, a prophetess, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher (she was of a great age, having lived with a husband seven years from her virginity 2.37. and she had been a widow for about eighty-four years), who didn't depart from the temple, worshipping with fastings and petitions night and day. 2.38. Coming up at that very hour, she gave thanks to the Lord, and spoke of him to all those who were looking for redemption in Jerusalem. 8.2. and certain women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities: Mary who was called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out; 8.3. and Joanna, the wife of Chuzas, Herod's steward; Susanna; and many others; who ministered to them from their possessions. 8.4. When a great multitude came together, and people from every city were coming to him, he spoke by a parable. 8.9. Then his disciples asked him, "What does this parable mean? 9.28. It happened about eight days after these sayings, that he took with him Peter, John, and James, and went up onto the mountain to pray. 9.29. As he was praying, the appearance of his face was altered, and his clothing became white and dazzling. 9.30. Behold, two men were talking with him, who were Moses and Elijah 9.31. who appeared in glory, and spoke of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem. 9.32. Now Peter and those who were with him were heavy with sleep, but when they were fully awake, they saw his glory, and the two men who stood with him. 9.33. It happened, as they were parting from him, that Peter said to Jesus, "Master, it is good for us to be here. Let's make three tents: one for you, and one for Moses, and one for Elijah," not knowing what he said. 9.34. While he said these things, a cloud came and overshadowed them, and they were afraid as they entered into the cloud. 9.35. A voice came out of the cloud, saying, "This is my beloved Son. Listen to him! 9.36. When the voice came, Jesus was found alone. They were silent, and told no one in those days any of the things which they had seen. 12.37. Blessed are those servants, whom the lord will find watching when he comes. Most assuredly I tell you, that he will dress himself, and make them recline, and will come and serve them. 13.22. He went on his way through cities and villages, teaching, and traveling on to Jerusalem. 13.27. He will say, 'I tell you, I don't know where you come from. Depart from me, all you workers of iniquity.' 13.28. There will be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and all the prophets, in the Kingdom of God, and yourselves being thrown outside. 15.26. He called one of the servants to him, and asked what was going on. 15.32. But it was appropriate to celebrate and be glad, for this, your brother, was dead, and is alive again. He was lost, and is found.' 17.26. As it happened in the days of Noah, even so will it be also in the days of the Son of Man. 17.27. They ate, they drank, they married, they were given in marriage, until the day that Noah entered into the ark, and the flood came, and destroyed them all. 17.33. Whoever seeks to save his life loses it, but whoever loses his life preserves it. 17.34. I tell you, in that night there will be two people in one bed. The one will be taken, and the other will be left. 19.43. For the days will come on you, when your enemies will throw up a barricade against you, surround you, hem you in on every side 19.44. and will dash you and your children within you to the ground. They will not leave in you one stone on another, because you didn't know the time of your visitation. 20.42. David himself says in the book of Psalms, 'The Lord said to my Lord,"Sit at my right hand 20.43. Until I make your enemies the footstool of your feet."' 20.44. David therefore calls him Lord, so how is he his son? 21.27. Then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. 24.23. and when they didn't find his body, they came saying that they had also seen a vision of angels, who said that he was alive. 24.37. But they were terrified and filled with fear, and supposed that they had seen a spirit.
22. New Testament, Mark, 6.49, 9.2-9.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.49. but they, when they saw him walking on the sea, supposed that it was a ghost, and cried out; 9.2. After six days Jesus took with him Peter, James, and John, and brought them up onto a high mountain privately by themselves, and he was changed into another form in front of them. 9.3. His clothing became glistening, exceedingly white, like snow, such as no launderer on earth can whiten them. 9.4. Elijah and Moses appeared to them, and they were talking with Jesus. 9.5. Peter answered Jesus, "Rabbi, it is good for us to be here. Let's make three tents: one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah. 9.6. For he didn't know what to say, for they were very afraid. 9.7. A cloud came, overshadowing them, and a voice came out of the cloud, "This is my beloved Son. Listen to him. 9.8. Suddenly looking around, they saw no one with them any more, except Jesus only. 9.9. As they were coming down from the mountain, he charged them that they should tell no one what things they had seen, until after the Son of Man had risen from the dead.
23. New Testament, Matthew, 14.26, 16.17-16.19, 17.1-17.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.26. When the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, "It's a ghost!" and they cried out for fear. 16.17. Jesus answered him, "Blessed are you, Simon Bar Jonah, for flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. 16.18. I also tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my assembly, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. 16.19. I will give to you the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven. 17.1. After six days, Jesus took with him Peter, James, and John his brother, and brought them up into a high mountain by themselves. 17.2. He was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and his garments became as white as the light. 17.3. Behold, Moses and Elijah appeared to them talking with him. 17.4. Peter answered, and said to Jesus, "Lord, it is good for us to be here. If you want, let's make three tents here: one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah. 17.5. While he was still speaking, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them. Behold, a voice came out of the cloud, saying, "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. Listen to him. 17.6. When the disciples heard it, they fell on their faces, and were very afraid. 17.7. Jesus came and touched them and said, "Get up, and don't be afraid. 17.8. Lifting up their eyes, they saw no one, except Jesus alone. 17.9. As they were coming down from the mountain, Jesus commanded them, saying, "Don't tell anyone what you saw, until the Son of Man has risen from the dead.
24. Plutarch, Aristides, 19.1-19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 42.11, 47.71, 50.19, 50.25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 3.11 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Eusebius of Caesarea, Commentary On Isaiah, 2.9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

28. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 3.31.3-3.31.4 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

3.31.3. For in Asia also great lights have fallen asleep, which shall rise again on the last day, at the coming of the Lord, when he shall come with glory from heaven and shall seek out all the saints. Among these are Philip, one of the twelve apostles, who sleeps in Hierapolis, and his two aged virgin daughters, and another daughter who lived in the Holy Spirit and now rests at Ephesus; and moreover John, who was both a witness and a teacher, who reclined upon the bosom of the Lord, and being a priest wore the sacerdotal plate. He also sleeps at Ephesus. 3.31.4. So much concerning their death. And in the Dialogue of Caius which we mentioned a little above, Proclus, against whom he directed his disputation, in agreement with what has been quoted, speaks thus concerning the death of Philip and his daughters: After him there were four prophetesses, the daughters of Philip, at Hierapolis in Asia. Their tomb is there and the tomb of their father. Such is his statement.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abuse,in polemic Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
acts of the apostles Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
alexandria Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
allegory/allegorical Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
apollonius of rhodes Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
apologetic Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
apologist Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
arianus,julius clements brother Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
artemidorus of daldis,greek writer Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
athenagoras Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
baptism,of cornelius Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 24, 25, 98
baptism,of ethiopian eunuch Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 98
baptism,of johns disciples Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 25
bar kochba,jewish leader Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
bird/birds Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
caesarea (by the sea) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
callimachus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
centurion Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
children fables Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
christianity Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
clement of alexandria,christian writer Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
commissioning narrative Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 23, 265
contest,dramatic Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 265
contest,rhetorical Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 265
cyrene Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
daughters of philip Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
day of the lord or judgement,the Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 188
delphi Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
devil see also satan Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
dietary regulations Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
divine plan/βουλή Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 191
divine speech,enigmatic Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 265
dream commands Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 23
dreams Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 188, 191; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
dreams and visions,deixis Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 176
dreams and visions,dream figures,phantoms Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 355
dreams and visions,prescient Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 176
dreams and visions,repeated internal features Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 176
dreams and visions,terminology,greek Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 355
dreams and visions,theorematic Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 176
egypt,macdonald d. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
egypt Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
elder),macdonald,d. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
elder) Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
epicureanism,attacks against Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
exegesis Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
expulsion narrative Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 19
ezekiel,tragedian,greek tragedians influence Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
ezekiel,tragedian Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
form criticism Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
genre,formal approach to Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
god,act/activity,mighty/ powerful of Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
god,foretelling of Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
god,prayer to Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
heart Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
heresy Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
homer,acts of apostles comparison (macdonald) Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
homer Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
humanity,outside paradise Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 19
identity,jewish Thiessen (2011), Contesting Conversion: Genealogy, Circumcision, and Identity in Ancient Judaism and Christianity, 125
inspiration Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
irony Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 176
jerusalem Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 188; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
jerusalem (zion),temple Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
jerusalem (zion) Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
jesus / christ Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
jew/jewish,diaspora Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
jew/jewish,greco- roman Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
jew/jewish,literature/ authors' "151.0_347.0@law,god's" Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
josephus flavius,jewish historian Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
judaism,acceptance of hellenism Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
judaism,cultural assimilation Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
judaism and hellenism Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
julius clement,roman soldier Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
justin,christian apologist Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
la donnée Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
laction de choix Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
laction finale Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
literature Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
lukan speaking formula Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
mcroberts,s. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
metaphor Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 192
moment Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 191
of parable,expanding and condensing narratives Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
of parable,fable structure Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
papias Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
paradise,in irenaean corpus Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 19
paradise,in lukan corpus Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 19
paul,christian apostle Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
peter-cornelius narrative and visions,intertextual approaches,ot Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 23
peter Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347; Thiessen (2011), Contesting Conversion: Genealogy, Circumcision, and Identity in Ancient Judaism and Christianity, 125
peter (apostle),gospel of Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 100
peter (apostle),syrian views of Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 100
peter (apostle),visionary Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 100
peter chrysologus,on cornelius Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 25, 98
peter chrysologus,on ethiopian eunuch Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 98
philip (apostle) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
philip (evangelist) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
plato,acts of apostles comparison (macdonald) Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
plato Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
pleasure Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
plot structure Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
plutarch Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
polemic Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
portents Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 191
prayer Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
priest Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
progymnasmata,expanding fables in Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
prophecy,commissioning narratives Moxon (2017), Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. 23
prophets,prophecy Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
purity Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
rebaptism' Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 25
redaction,expanding fables in Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
rome Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
réplique finale Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 329
septuagint Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 188
serapion of antioch Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 100
serapis,egyptian god Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
simeon,homeric phrases Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
simeon,macdonald,d. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
simeon,mcroberts,s. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
simeon,use of homer Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
simmias Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
social behaviour (of animals) Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
speaking in (other) tongues Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
spirit,characterizations as,breath (life itself) Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
spirit,characterizations as,voice Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
spirit,effects of,ecstasy/frenzy Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
spirit,effects of,enthusiasm Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
spirit,effects of,interpret dreams/scripture Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
spirit,modes of presence,indwelling Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
spirit,modes of presence,receiving of Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 347
symbol/symbolism Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 11
synagogue Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
theodotus,collins,j.j. Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
theodotus Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 203
tibur,hadrians villa,canopus Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
tibur,hadrians villa,piazza doro Rizzi (2010), Hadrian and the Christians, 123
tralleis Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 195
vaticinium ex eventu Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 191
vindication of the righteous Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 188
way (jesus as),in irenaean corpus Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 19
way (jesus as),in lukan corpus Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 19
weapon Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212
women Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 212