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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8035
Mishnah, Qinim, 2.5


חַטָּאת מִיכָּן וְעוֹלָה מִיכָּן וּסְתוּמָה בָאֶמְצַע, פָּרַח מִן הָאֶמְצַע לַצְּדָדִין, אֶחָד הֵלָךְ וְאֶחָד הֵלָךְ, לֹא הִפְסִיד כְּלוּם, אֶלָּא יֹאמַר, זֶה שֶׁהָלַךְ אֵצֶל חַטָּאוֹת, חַטָּאת. וְזֶה שֶׁהָלַךְ אֵצֶל עוֹלוֹת, עוֹלָה. חָזַר לָאֶמְצַע, הָאֶמְצָעִיִּים יָמוּתוּ, אֵלּוּ יִקְרְבוּ חַטָּאוֹת, וְאֵלּוּ יִקְרְבוּ עוֹלוֹת. חָזַר אוֹ שֶׁפָּרַח מִן הָאֶמְצַע לַצְּדָדִין, הֲרֵי כֻלָּן יָמוּתוּ. אֵין מְבִיאִין תּוֹרִין כְּנֶגֶד בְּנֵי יוֹנָה, וְלֹא בְנֵי יוֹנָה כְּנֶגֶד תּוֹרִין. כֵּיצַד. הָאִשָּׁה שֶׁהֵבִיאָה חַטָּאתָהּ תּוֹר, וְעוֹלָתָהּ בֶּן יוֹנָה, תִּכְפֹּל וְתָבִיא עוֹלָתָהּ תּוֹר. עוֹלָתָהּ תּוֹר, וְחַטָּאתָהּ בֶּן יוֹנָה, תִּכְפֹּל וְתָבִיא עוֹלָתָהּ בֶּן יוֹנָה. בֶּן עַזַּאי אוֹמֵר, הוֹלְכִין אַחַר הָרִאשׁוֹן. הָאִשָּׁה שֶׁהֵבִיאָה חַטָּאתָהּ וּמֵתָה, יָבִיאוּ הַיּוֹרְשִׁין עוֹלָתָהּ. עוֹלָתָהּ וּמֵתָה, לֹא יָבִיאוּ הַיּוֹרְשִׁין חַטָּאתָהּ:Hatat [birds] are on one side, and olot [birds] are on the other and an unassigned [pair] is in the middle: If from the middle pair one bird flew to this side, and one bird flew to this side, then he has not lost anything, because he [the priest] says that the bird that flew [from the middle] towards the hataot is a hatat and the bird that flew towards the olot is a burnt-offering. If one [from each side] returns to the middle, then [all] those in the middle must be left to die, but those [left on either side] can be offered up as hataot or as olot respectively. If again a bird [from the middle] returned and flew away to the sides, then all must be left to die. One cannot pair turtle-doves with pigeons or pigeons with turtle-doves. How is this so? If a woman has brought a turtle-dove as her hatat and a pigeon as her olah, she must then bring another turtle-dove as her burnt-offering; If her olah had been a turtle-dove and her hatat a pigeon, then she must bring another pigeon as her olah. Ben Azzai says: we go after the first [offering]. If a woman brought her hatat and then died, her heirs must bring her olah; [But if she first brought] her olah and then died, her heirs need not bring her hatat.


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animal,domestic,topology of its body Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 195
durand,j.-l. Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 195
mishnah,and sacrifice Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 195
pollution Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 195
sacrifice,animal,comparison between greek and jewish Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 195
sacrifice,animal,in judaism v,vi' Petropoulou (2012), Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200, 195