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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8017
Mishnah, Maaser Sheni, 5.14


מִכָּאן אָמְרוּ, יִשְׂרָאֵל וּמַמְזֵרִים מִתְוַדִּים, אֲבָל לֹא גֵרִים וְלֹא עֲבָדִים מְשֻׁחְרָרִים, שֶׁאֵין לָהֶם חֵלֶק בָּאָרֶץ. רַבִּי מֵאִיר אוֹמֵר, אַף לֹא כֹהֲנִים וּלְוִיִּם, שֶׁלֹּא נָטְלוּ חֵלֶק בָּאָרֶץ. רַבִּי יוֹסֵי אוֹמֵר, יֵשׁ לָהֶם עָרֵי מִגְרָשׁ:From here they said that Israelites and mamzerim may make the confession, but not converts, nor freed slaves, since they have no inheritance in the land. Rabbi Meir says: neither do priests and Levites since they did not take a share of the land. Rabbi Yose says: they have the Levitical cities.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Mishnah, Bikkurim, 1.4 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.4. These bring [bikkurim] but do not read the declaration:The convert, since he cannot say: “Which the Lord has sworn to our fathers, to give to us” (Deuteronomy 26:3). If his mother was an Israelite, then he brings bikkurim and recites. When he prays privately, he says: “God of the fathers of Israel,” but when he is in the synagogue, he should say: “The God of your fathers.” But if his mother was an Israelite, he says: “The God of our fathers’."
3. Mishnah, Horayot, 1.4, 3.8 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.4. If the court ruled and one of them knew that they had erred and said to the others, “You are making a mistake”, or if the mufla of the court was not there, or if one of them was a proselyte or a mamzer or a nathin or an elder who did not have children, they are exempt, for it says here (Lev 4:13) “congregation” and it says later on (Num 35:24) “congregation”; just as the “congregation” further on must be fit to issue rulings, so too the “congregation” mentioned here must be fit to issue rulingsIf the court issued a [wrong] decision unwittingly and all the people acted unwittingly, they bring a bull. [If the court ruled wrong] intentionally and [the people] acted unwillingly, they bring a lamb or a goat. [If the court ruled] unwittingly and [the people] acted willingly accordingly, they are exempt." 3.8. A priest takes precedence over a levite, a levite over an israelite, an israelite over a mamzer, a mamzer over a natin, a natin over a convert, and a convert over a freed slave. When is this so? When all these were in other respects equal. However, if the mamzer was a scholar and the high priest an ignoramus, the scholar mamzer takes precedence over the ignorant high priest."
4. Mishnah, Ketuvot, 1.2-1.3 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.2. A virgin her kethubah is two hundred [zuz], and a widow a maneh (100. A virgin, who is a widow, [or] divorced, or a halutzah from betrothal her kethubah is two hundred [zuz], and there is upon her a claim of non-virginity. A female proselyte, a woman captive, and a woman slave, who have been redeemed, converted, or freed [when they were] less than three years and one day old their kethubah is two hundred [zuz] there is upon them a claim of non-virginity." 1.3. When an adult has had sexual intercourse with a young girl, or when a small boy has had intercourse with an adult woman, or a girl who was injured by a piece of wood [in all these cases] their kethubah is two hundred [zuz], the words of Rabbi Meir. But the Sages say: a girl who was injured by a piece of wood her kethubah is a maneh."
5. Mishnah, Maaser Sheni, 5.10 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.10. At minhah on the last festival day they would make the confession. How was the confession made? “I have cleared out the holy portion from the house” this refers to maaser sheni and the fruit of plants in their fourth year. “I have given them to the Levite” this refers to the tithe of the levites. “And also I have given them” this refers to terumah and the terumah of tithe. “To the stranger, to the orphans, and to the widow” this refers to the tithe of the poor, gleanings, forgotten sheaves, and the corners of the field, even though these do not prevent [one from making] the confession. “Out of the house” this refers to hallah."
6. Mishnah, Qiddushin, 4.1, 4.3-4.4 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Mishnah, Sanhedrin, 10 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Mishnah, Sotah, 7.5 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.5. How were the blessings and curses [pronounced]?When Israel crossed the Jordan and came to Mt. Gerizim and Mt. Ebal which are by Samaria, in the vicinity of Shechem which is near the terebinths of Moreh, as it is said, “Are they not the other side of the Jordan, [beyond the west road that is in the land of the Canaanites who dwell in the Arabah near Gilgal, by the terebinths of Moreh] (Deut. 11:30), and elsewhere it says, “And Abram passed through the land unto the place of Shechem unto the terebinth of Moreh” (Genesis 12:6) just as the terebinth of Moreh mentioned in this latter verse is Shechem, so the terebinth of Moreh mentioned in the former verse is Shechem. Six tribes went up Mt. Gerizim and six tribes went up Mt. Ebal, and the priests and Levites with the ark stood below in the middle, the priests surrounding the ark, the Levites [surrounding] the priests, and all Israel on this side and that side, as it is said, “And all Israel, with their elders, officials, and judges stood on both sides of the ark, facing the levitical priests” (Joshua 8:33). They turned their faces towards Mt. Gerizim and opened with the blessing: Blessed be anyone who does not make a graven or molten image”. And these and these respond amen. They then turned their faces towards Mt. Ebal and opened with the curse: “Cursed be anyone who makes a graven or molten image” (Deut. 27:15). And these and these respond amen. [So they continue] until they complete the blessings and curses. After that they brought the stones, built the altar and plastered it with plaster, and inscribed upon it all the words of the Torah in seventy languages, as it is said, “most distinctly (be’er hetev). Then they took the stones and went and spent the night in their place."
9. Mishnah, Zevahim, 5.3, 6.5 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

5.3. [Concerning] public and private hatats: (These are the public hatats: the goats of new moons and festivals) They are slaughtered in the north, and their blood is received in ministering vessels in the north, and their blood requires four applications on the four corners [of the altar]. How was it done? He went up the ascent, turned to the surrounding walkway, and came to the south-east corner, then the north-east, then the north-west, and then the south-west. He would pour the residue of the blood out at the southern base. They were eaten within the hangings [of the Tabernacle], by male priests, prepared in any fashion, the same day and night, until midnight." 6.5. How was the olah of a bird sacrificed? He [the priest] ascended the ramp, and turned to the surrounding walkway, and made his way to the southeast horn. There he pinched its head at the back of the neck, and severed it, and drained out its blood on the wall of the altar. He took the head, turned the part where it was nipped to the altar, saturated it with salt, and threw it on to the fires [of the altar]. Then he came to the body, and removed the crop, the feathers, and the entrails that came out of it, and threw them on to the burning place. He tore [the body], but did not sever it in half, but if he did sever it, it is still valid. Then he saturated it [the body] with salt, and threw it on to the fires of the altar."


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aaron Samely, Rabbinic Interpretation of Scripture in the Mishnah (2002) 155
city, apostate Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
converts/proselytes, ranking below native jews in matrimonial law Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 362
converts/proselytes, treatment under homicide and tort law Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 362
ger Cohen, The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism (2010) 362
heifers neck, ritual of breaking Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
leper, leprosy Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
mishnah, law and narrative in Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
nazirite Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
ritual, narration of Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
son, rebellious Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
tithes, avowal of Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242
war, priest anointed for' Rosen-Zvi, The Mishnaic Sotah Ritual: Temple, Gender and Midrash (2012) 242