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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Mimnermus Of Colophon, Fragments, 13a
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13 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 95, 94 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 95, 94 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Hesiod, Works And Days, 655-659, 654 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

654. Unyoke your team and grant a holiday.
4. Mimnermus of Colophon, Fragments, 14, 13 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

5. Solon, Fragments, 1 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

6. Tyrtaeus, Fragments, 5 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7. Simonides, Fragments, 3, 11 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Simonides, Fragments, 3, 11 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Herodotus, Histories, 1.1-1.5, 3.80 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.1. The Persian learned men say that the Phoenicians were the cause of the dispute. These (they say) came to our seas from the sea which is called Red, and having settled in the country which they still occupy, at once began to make long voyages. Among other places to which they carried Egyptian and Assyrian merchandise, they came to Argos, ,which was at that time preeminent in every way among the people of what is now called Hellas . The Phoenicians came to Argos, and set out their cargo. ,On the fifth or sixth day after their arrival, when their wares were almost all sold, many women came to the shore and among them especially the daughter of the king, whose name was Io (according to Persians and Greeks alike), the daughter of Inachus. ,As these stood about the stern of the ship bargaining for the wares they liked, the Phoenicians incited one another to set upon them. Most of the women escaped: Io and others were seized and thrown into the ship, which then sailed away for Egypt . 1.2. In this way, the Persians say (and not as the Greeks), was how Io came to Egypt, and this, according to them, was the first wrong that was done. Next, according to their story, some Greeks (they cannot say who) landed at Tyre in Phoenicia and carried off the king's daughter Europa. These Greeks must, I suppose, have been Cretans. So far, then, the account between them was balanced. But after this (they say), it was the Greeks who were guilty of the second wrong. ,They sailed in a long ship to Aea, a city of the Colchians, and to the river Phasis : and when they had done the business for which they came, they carried off the king's daughter Medea. ,When the Colchian king sent a herald to demand reparation for the robbery and restitution of his daughter, the Greeks replied that, as they had been refused reparation for the abduction of the Argive Io, they would not make any to the Colchians. 1.3. Then (they say), in the second generation after this, Alexandrus, son of Priam, who had heard this tale, decided to get himself a wife from Hellas by capture; for he was confident that he would not suffer punishment. ,So he carried off Helen. The Greeks first resolved to send messengers demanding that Helen be restored and atonement made for the seizure; but when this proposal was made, the Trojans pleaded the seizure of Medea, and reminded the Greeks that they asked reparation from others, yet made none themselves, nor gave up the booty when asked. 1.4. So far it was a matter of mere seizure on both sides. But after this (the Persians say), the Greeks were very much to blame; for they invaded Asia before the Persians attacked Europe . ,“We think,” they say, “that it is unjust to carry women off. But to be anxious to avenge rape is foolish: wise men take no notice of such things. For plainly the women would never have been carried away, had they not wanted it themselves. ,We of Asia did not deign to notice the seizure of our women; but the Greeks, for the sake of a Lacedaemonian woman, recruited a great armada, came to Asia, and destroyed the power of Priam. ,Ever since then we have regarded Greeks as our enemies.” For the Persians claim Asia for their own, and the foreign peoples that inhabit it; Europe and the Greek people they consider to be separate from them. 1.5. Such is the Persian account; in their opinion, it was the taking of Troy which began their hatred of the Greeks. ,But the Phoenicians do not tell the same story about Io as the Persians. They say that they did not carry her off to Egypt by force. She had intercourse in Argos with the captain of the ship. Then, finding herself pregt, she was ashamed to have her parents know it, and so, lest they discover her condition, she sailed away with the Phoenicians of her own accord. ,These are the stories of the Persians and the Phoenicians. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike. ,For many states that were once great have now become small; and those that were great in my time were small before. Knowing therefore that human prosperity never continues in the same place, I shall mention both alike. 3.80. After the tumult quieted down, and five days passed, the rebels against the Magi held a council on the whole state of affairs, at which sentiments were uttered which to some Greeks seem incredible, but there is no doubt that they were spoken. ,Otanes was for turning the government over to the Persian people: “It seems to me,” he said, “that there can no longer be a single sovereign over us, for that is not pleasant or good. You saw the insolence of Cambyses, how far it went, and you had your share of the insolence of the Magus. ,How can monarchy be a fit thing, when the ruler can do what he wants with impunity? Give this power to the best man on earth, and it would stir him to unaccustomed thoughts. Insolence is created in him by the good things to hand, while from birth envy is rooted in man. ,Acquiring the two he possesses complete evil; for being satiated he does many reckless things, some from insolence, some from envy. And yet an absolute ruler ought to be free of envy, having all good things; but he becomes the opposite of this towards his citizens; he envies the best who thrive and live, and is pleased by the worst of his fellows; and he is the best confidant of slander. ,of all men he is the most inconsistent; for if you admire him modestly he is angry that you do not give him excessive attention, but if one gives him excessive attention he is angry because one is a flatter. But I have yet worse to say of him than that; he upsets the ancestral ways and rapes women and kills indiscriminately. ,But the rule of the multitude has in the first place the loveliest name of all, equality, and does in the second place none of the things that a monarch does. It determines offices by lot, and holds power accountable, and conducts all deliberating publicly. Therefore I give my opinion that we make an end of monarchy and exalt the multitude, for all things are possible for the majority.”
10. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.1-1.22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plutarch, Solon, 8.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.2. and a report was given out to the city by his family that he showed signs of madness. He then secretly composed some elegiac verses, and after rehearsing them so that he could say them by rote, he sallied out into the market-place of a sudden, with a cap upon his head. After a large crowd had collected there, he got upon the herald’s stone and recited the poem which begins:— Behold in me a herald come from lovely Salamis, With a song in ordered verse instead of a harangue. Only six more verses are preserved ( Fragments 1-3, Bergk ). They contain reproaches of the Athenians for abandoning Salamis, and an exhortation to go and fight for it.
12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.29.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.29.4. There are some who say that Pierus himself had nine daughters, that their names were the same as those of the goddesses, and that those whom the Greeks called the children of the Muses were sons of the daughters of Pierus. Mimnermus, who composed elegiac verses about the battle between the Smyrnaeans and the Lydians under Gyges, says in the preface that the elder Muses are daughters of Uranus, and that there are other and younger Muses, children of Zeus.
13. Mimnermus, Fragments, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcman Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
allen, t. w. Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179
amazon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
amphidamas Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
antimachus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118; Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 179, 396
archilochus, i, v, vii, ix, xi Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
ares Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
aristomenes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
artemisium Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
asia minor Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
athena Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
boedeker, deborah Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
calaïs Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
callimachus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48
callinus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
catalogue Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
chalcis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
chronology Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
colophon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
commentator, ancient Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48
dioscuri Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
early Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118
epic' Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118
epic, i Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 196
exhortation, ix Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179
first performance Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
graces Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
grethlein, jonas Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
gyges Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118; Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 179, 396, 695
helicon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
hellenistic Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 396
hermes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
hermus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48
herodotus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118; Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48
hesiod, theogony Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
historiography, i Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179, 196
homer Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
hortatory Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
hour-glass shape Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
iliad Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179, 695
inspiration Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48
ithome Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179
lydia, lydian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118; Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 179, 695
martial Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
menelaus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
messenia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
messenian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
mimnermus, smyrneis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118
mimnermus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118; Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
muse Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118; Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 179
myth Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 396
nanno, smyrneis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179, 396, 695
nanno Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179
odyssey Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
oral Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
pausanias Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 396
peloponnese Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
persia, persian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
pindar Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
plataea Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
plutarch, solon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179
plutarch Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
prose Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
pylos Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
salamis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179
simonides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
smyrna Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 396, 695
smyrnaean Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 179, 396, 695
solon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 695
sparta Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
speech Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 48, 179, 196, 396, 695
strabo Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179
suda Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
theopompus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 179, 196
thucydides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
transmission Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 396
troy Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
tyrtaeus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
uranus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695
war, peloponnesian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
zetes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
zeus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 118; Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 695