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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7840
Maximus Of Tyre, Dialexeis, 2.10
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Aristotle, On The Universe, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 3.92 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.92. But at all events a god could have come to the aid of those great and splendid cities and have preserved them — for you yourselves are fond of saying that there is nothing that a god cannot accomplish, and that without any toil; as man's limbs are effortlessly moved merely by his mind and will, so, as you say, the god's power can mould and move and alter all things. Nor do you say this as some superstitious fable or old wives' tale, but you give a scientific and systematic account of it: you allege that matter, which constitutes and contains all things, is in its entirety flexible and subject to change, so that there is nothing that cannot be moulded and transmuted out of it however suddenly, but the moulder and manipulator of this universal substance is divine providence, and therefore providence, whithersoever it moves, is able to perform whatever it will. Accordingly either providence does not know its own powers, or it does not regard human affairs, or it lacks power of judgement to discern what is the best.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.67 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.67. Perhaps, however, the historian, by this allegorical form of expression, does not here mean by his expression, "place," the Cause of all things; but the idea which he intends to convey may be something of this sort; --he came to the place, and looking up with his eyes he saw the very place to which he had come, which was a very long way from the God who may not be named nor spoken of, and who is in every way incomprehensible. XII.
4. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.2, 3.14, 3.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.2. Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. 3.14. For this cause, I bow my knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ 3.20. Now to him who is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that works in us
5. New Testament, Philippians, 2.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.9. Therefore God also highly exalted him, and gave to him the name which is above every name;
6. Maximus of Tyre, Dialexeis, 11.9, 11.11-11.12, 13.3-13.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Origen, Against Celsus, 7.43 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.43. Observe that when Plato says, that after having found out the Creator and Father of the universe, it is impossible to make Him known to all men, he does not speak of Him as unspeakable, and as incapable of being expressed in words. On the contrary, he implies that He may be spoken of, and that there are a few to whom He may be made known. But Celsus, as if forgetting the language which he had just quoted from Plato, immediately gives God the name of the unspeakable. He says: since the wise men have found out this way, in order to be able to give us some idea of the First of Beings, who is unspeakable. For ourselves, we hold that not God alone is unspeakable, but other things also which are inferior to Him. Such are the things which Paul labours to express when he says, I heard unspeakable words, which it is not lawful for a man to utter, where the word heard is used in the sense of understood; as in the passage, He who has ears to hear, let him hear. We also hold that it is a hard matter to see the Creator and Father of the universe; but it is possible to see Him in the way thus referred to, Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God; and not only so, but also in the sense of the words of Him who is the image of the invisible God; He who has seen Me has seen the Father who sent Me. No sensible person could suppose that these last words were spoken in reference to His bodily presence, which was open to the view of all; otherwise all those who said, Crucify him, crucify him, and Pilate, who had power over the humanity of Jesus, were among those who saw God the Father, which is absurd. Moreover, that these words, He that has seen Me, has seen the Father who sent Me, are not to be taken in their grosser sense, is plain from the answer which He gave to Philip, Have I been so long time with you, and yet do you not know Me, Philip? after Philip had asked, Show us the Father, and it suffices us. He, then, who perceives how these words, The Word was made flesh, are to be understood of the only-begotten Son of God, the first-born of all creation, will also understand how, in seeing the image of the invisible God, we see the Creator and Father of the universe.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aristotle, pseudo- Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
bible (hebrew bible and/or new testament) Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151, 155, 159
book of thomas the contender, catholic christianity Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151, 155, 159
children Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151, 155, 159
cicero Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
cosmos or cosmology Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
didache, to teach Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151
education, aurality/orality and Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151, 155, 159
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 321
god or supreme father (demiurge) Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
harmony ( harmonia ) Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
hierarchy, gender Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 155, 159
hierarchy, social Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 155, 159
jesus Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151
maximus of tyre Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
music Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
new testament Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151, 155, 159
ousia Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
rule Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
soul, the, platonic model of Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
soul, the, stoic model of Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
stoics Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 128
students/learners Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151, 155, 159
teachers, christian Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 159
teaching, healthy teaching Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151
teaching Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 155, 159
women' Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 159
women Damm, Religions and Education in Antiquity (2018) 151, 155