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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7787
Martial, Spectacula, 1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Horace, Odes, 3.30.1-3.30.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Livy, History, 7.2.4-7.2.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Martial, Epigrams, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Martial, Epigrams, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Martial, Spectacula, 27, 3, 33, 2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.45 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Nero, 31.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Annals, 14.20-14.21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.20.  In the consulate of Nero — his fourth term — and of Cornelius Cossus, a quinquennial competition on the stage, in the style of a Greek contest, was introduced at Rome. Like almost all innovations it was variously canvassed. Some insisted that "even Pompey had been censured by his elders for establishing the theatre in a permanent home. Before, the games had usually been exhibited with the help of improvised tiers of benches and a stage thrown up for the occasion; or, to go further into the past, the people stood to watch: seats in the theatre, it was feared, might tempt them to pass whole days in indolence. By all means let the spectacles be retained in their old form, whenever the praetor presided, and so long as no citizen lay under any obligation to compete. But the national morality, which had gradually fallen into oblivion, was being overthrown from the foundations by this imported licentiousness; the aim of which was that every production of every land, capable of either undergoing or engendering corruption, should be on view in the capital, and that our youth, under the influence of foreign tastes, should degenerate into votaries of the gymnasia, of indolence, and of dishonourable amours, — and this at the instigation of the emperor and senate, who, not content with conferring immunity upon vice, were applying compulsion, in order that Roman nobles should pollute themselves on the stage under pretext of delivering an oration or a poem. What remained but to strip to the skin as well, put on the gloves, and practise that mode of conflict instead of the profession of arms? Would justice be promoted, would the equestrian decuries better fulfil their great judicial functions, if they had lent an expert ear to emasculated music and dulcet voices? Even night had been re­quisitioned for scandal, so that virtue should not be left with a breathing-space, but that amid a promiscuous crowd every vilest profligate might venture in the dark the act for which he had lusted in the light. 14.21.  It was this very prospect of licence which attracted the majority; and yet their pretexts were decently phrased:— "Even our ancestors had not been averse from amusing themselves with spectacles in keeping with the standard of wealth in their day; and that was the reason why actors had been imported from Etruria and horse-races from Thurii. Since the annexation of Achaia and Asia, games had been exhibited in a more ambitious style; and yet, at Rome, no one born in a respectable rank of life had condescended to the stage as a profession, though it was now two hundred years since the triumph of Lucius Mummius, who first gave an exhibition of the kind in the capital. But, more than this, it had been a measure of economy when the theatre was housed in a permanent building instead of being reared and razed, year after year, at enormous expense. Again, the magistrates would not have the same drain upon their private resources, nor the populace the same excuse for demanding contests in the Greek style from the magistrates, when the cost was defrayed by the state. The victories of orators and poets would apply a spur to genius; nor need it lie heavy on the conscience of any judge, if he had not turned a deaf ear to reputable arts and to legitimate pleasures. It was to gaiety, rather than to wantonness, that a few nights were being given out of five whole years — nights in which, owing to the blaze of illuminations, nothing illicit could be concealed." The display in question, it must be granted, passed over without any glaring scandal; and there was no outbreak, even slight, of popular partisanship, since the pantomimic actors, though restored to the stage, were debarred from the sacred contests. The first prize for eloquence was not awarded, but an announcement was made that the Caesar had proved victorious. The Greek dress, in which a great number of spectators had figured during the festival, immediately went out of vogue.
9. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 8.20 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 8.20 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Various, Anthologia Latina, 9.58



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alpheus, river Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333
antioch, syrian Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
antiochus iv epiphanes Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
apostrophe König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129
artemis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333
augustus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333
babylon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333
beast hunts Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
caria Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332
celts Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
delos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332
domitian König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129
ephesus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332
etruscans Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
flavian amphitheater Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333, 334; Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
flavian amphitheatre König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129
gladiatorial combat Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
horse racing Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
interdiscursivity König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129, 136
lake vadimon König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 136
lakes and lake-like waters König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 136
literary interactions, diachronic König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129, 136
livy Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
martial, and antipater Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333, 334
martial, and catullus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333, 334
martial, and pliny König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 136
martial, and statius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333, 334
martial, and the greek epigrammatic tradition Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333, 334
martial, influence of callimachus on Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332, 333, 334
martial, liber spectaculorum König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129, 136
martial König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129, 136; Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
marvels König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129, 136
mausolus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333
memphis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 332
nature König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 136
nero, domus aurea of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 334
nero Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333, 334; Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
pliny (the younger) König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 136
pyramids Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333, 334
roman entertainment, pagan critiques Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
rome, as centre of empire König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129, 136
rome Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
saturnalia Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 334
socio-literary interactions König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129
sol Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333, 334
spectacle and spectacular König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129
sun, colossus of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333, 334
tacitus Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
titus' Spielman, Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World (2020) 152
titus König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 129
zeus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 333