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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7785
Martial, Epigrams, 12.23


nanTO LAELIA: You wear bought teeth, and bought hair, Laelia, without a blush. What will you do for an eye? You cannot buy that.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Martial, Epigrams, 12.23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 30-31, 29 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 1.8, 8.18-8.19 (2nd cent. CE

1.8. Now Euxenus realized that he was attached to a lofty ideal, and asked him at what point he would begin it. Apollonius answered: At the point at which physicians begin, for they, by purging the bowels of their patients prevent some from being ill at all, and heal others. And having said this he declined to live upon a flesh diet, on the ground that it was unclean, and also that it made the mind gross; so he partook only of dried fruits and vegetables, for he said that all the fruits of the earth are clean. And of wine he said that it was a clean drink because it is yielded to men by so well-domesticated a plant as the vine; but he declared that it endangered the mental balance and system and darkened, as with mud, the ether which is in the soul. After then having thus purged his interior, he took to walking without shoes by way of adornment and clad himself in linen raiment, declining to wear any animal product; and he let his hair grow long and lived in the Temple. And the people round about the Temple were struck with admiration for him, and the god Asclepius one day said to the priest that he was delighted to have Apollonius as witness of his cures of the sick; and such was his reputation that the Cilicians themselves and the people all around flocked to Aegae to visit him. Hence the Cilician proverb: Whither runnest thou? Is it to see the stripling? Such was the saying that arose about him, and it gained the distinction of becoming a proverb. 8.18. There was a man of Thessaly, named Isagoras, whom he met in Olympia and said: Tell me, Isagoras, is there such a thing as a religious fair (panegyris)? Why yes, he replied, and by heaven there is nothing in the world of men, so agreeable and so dear to the gods. And what is the material of which it is composed? asked Apollonius; It is as if I asked you about the material of which this image is made, and you answered me that it was composed of gold and ivory. But, said the other, what material, Apollonius, can a thing which is incorporeal be composed of? A most important material, replied Apollonius, and most varied in character; for there are sacred precincts in it, and sanctuaries and race-courses and, of course, a scene-building, and tribes of men, some of them from neighboring countries, and others from over the borders, and even from across the sea. Moreover, he added, many arts go to make up such a festival, and many designs, and much true genius, both of poets, and of civil counselors, and of those who deliver harangues on philosophic topics, and contests between naked athletes, and contests of musicians, as is the custom in the Pythian festival. It seems to me, said the other, O Apollonius, that the festival is not only something corporeal, but is made up of more wonderful material than are cities; for there is summoned together into one community on such occasions the best of the best, and the most celebrated of the celebrated.Then, said Apollonius, O Isagoras, are we to consider the people we meet there in the same light as some people regard walls and ships, or do you need some other opinion of the festival? The opinion, answered the other, which we have formulated, is quite adequate and complete, O man of Tyana, and we had better adhere to it. And yet, said the other, it is neither adequate nor complete to one who considers about is as I do; for it appears to me that ships are in need of men and men of ships, and that men would never have thought about the sea at all if they had not had a ship; and men are kept safe by walls and walls by men; and in the same way I consider a festival to be not only the meeting of human beings, but also the place itself in which they have to meet, and the more so, because walls and ships would never have come into being, unless there had been men's hands to build them, while these places, so far forth as they are deprived of their natural and original characteristics, are by the hands of men spoiled; for it was owing to their natural advantages that they were held worthy of being made their meeting-places; for though the gymnasiums and porticoes and fountains and houses have been all created by human art, just like the walls and the ships, yet this river Alpheus with the hippodrome and the stadium and the groves, existed, I suppose, before men came here, the one providing water for drinking and for the bath, and the second a broad plain for the horses to race in, and the third provided just the space required for the athletes to raise the dust in as they run along in their races, namely a valley a stadium in length, and the groves supplied wreaths for the winners and served the athletes who were runners as a place to practice in. For I imagine that Heracles considered these facts, and because he admired the natural advantages of Olympia, he found the place worthy of the festival and games which are still held here. 8.19. After forty days, given up to discussions in Olympia, in which many topics were handled, Apollonius said: I will also, O men of Hellas, discourse to you in your several cities, at your festivals, at your religious processions, at your mysteries, your sacrifices, at your public libations, and they require the services of a clever man; but for the present I must go down to Lebadea, for I have never yet had an interview with Trophonius, although I once visited his shrine. And with these words he at once started for Boeotia attended by every one of his admirers. Now the cavern in Lebadea is dedicated to Trophonius, the son of Apollo, and it can only be entered by those who resort thither in order to get an oracle, and it is not visible in the sanctuary, but lies a little above it on a mound; and it is shut in by iron spits which surround it, and you descend into it as it were sitting down and being drawn down. Those who enter it are clad in white raiment, and are escorted thither with honey-cakes in their hands to appease the reptiles which assail them as they descend. But the earth brings them to the surface again, in some cases close by, but in other cases a long way off; for they are sent up to the surface beyond Locris and beyond Phocis, but most of them about the borders of Boeotia. Accordingly Apollonius entered the shrine and said: I wish to descend into the cave in the interests of philosophy.But the priests opposed him and though they told the multitude that they would never allow a wizard like him to examine and test the shrine, they pretended to the sage himself that there were forbidden days and days unclean for consulting. So on that day he delivered a discourse at the springs of Hercyne, about the origin and conduct of the shrine; for it is the only oracle which gives responses through the person himself who consults it. And when the evening approached, he went to the mouth of the cave with his train of youthful followers, and having pulled up four of the obelisks, which constitute a bar to the passage, he went down below ground wearing his philosopher's mantle, having dressed himself as if he were going to deliver an address upon philosophy — a step which the god Trophonius so thoroughly approved of, that he appeared to the priests and not only rebuked them for the reception they had given Apollonius, but enjoined them all to follow him to Aulis, for he said it was there that he would come to surface in such a marvelous fashion as no man before. And in fact he emerged after seven days, a longer period than it had taken anyone of those who until then had entered the oracle, and he had with him a volume thoroughly in keeping with the questions he had asked: for had gone down saying: What, O Trophonius, do you consider the most complete and purest philosophy? And the volume contained the tenets of Pythagoras, a good proof this, that the oracle was in agreement with this form of wisdom.
4. Epigraphy, Cil, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accessories Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
age, old Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
age, youth Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
apollonius of tyana Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
appearance Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
artemidorus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
athens Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
beauty, attitude towards Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
blindness Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
christians, christianity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
class status Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
cosmetics Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
cultus Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
daimon Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
deformity Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
deification Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
diogenes Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
doctors/physicians Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
dolls Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
dress, bridal Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
dress, citizens Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
dress, female Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
dress, soldiers Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
dwarf Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
elderly Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
empedocles Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
fidentinus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
gender Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
gladiators Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
grooming Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
haircombs Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
horace Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
identity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
individual, profession Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
issa Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
love Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
lucillius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
lycoris Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
madness Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
martial, and catullus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
martial, and statius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
martial, and the greek epigrammatic tradition Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
martial, influence of callimachus on Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
martial Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
mirrors Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
modesty Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
mundus muliebris Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
nicylla Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
old age Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
ornatus Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
philip of thessalonica, garland of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
philostratus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
portraits, principate Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
pythagoras, pythagorean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
reliefs, mundus muliebris Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
self-fashioning Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
socrates Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
soldiers Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
synesius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
temples Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
toiletries Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
turia, Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
vates Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
velox Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 340
vice Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
vision Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
weaving Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
wife, wives Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
wisdom Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 201
womanhood Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187
women' Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 106
womens toilette Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 187