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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7785
Martial, Epigrams, 10.20


nanTO MANIUS: That Celtiberian Salo draws me to its auriferous banks, that I am pleased again to visit the dwellings of my native land suspended amid rocks, you, Manius, are the cause; you who have been beloved of me from my infant years, and cherished with affection in the days of my youth; than whom there is no one in all Iberia dearer to me, or more worthy of real regard. With you I should delight even in a tent of the Libyan desert, or a hut of the savage Scythian. If your sentiments are the same, if our affections are mutual, every place will be a Rome to us both.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Cicero, On Duties, 1.144 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.144. Talis est igitur ordo actionum adhibendus, ut, quem ad modum in oratione constanti, sic in vita omnia sint apta inter se et convenientia; turpe enimn valdeque vitiosum in re severa convivio digna aut delicatum aliquem inferre sermonem. Bene Pericles, cum haberet collegam in praetura Sophoclem poëtam iique de communi officio convenissent et casu formosus puer praeteriret dixissetque Sophocles: O puerum pulchrum, Pericle! At enim praetorem, Sophocle, decet non solum manus, sed etiam oculos abstinentes habere. Atqui hoc idem Sophocles si in athletarum probatione dixisset, iusta reprehensione caruisset. Tanta vis est et loci et temporis. Ut, si qui, cum causam sit acturus, in itinere aut in ambulatione secum ipse meditetur, aut si quid aliud attentius cogitet, non reprehendatur, at hoc idem si in convivio faciat, inhumanus videatur inscitia temporis. 1.144.  Such orderliness of conduct is, therefore, to be observed, that everything in the conduct of our life shall balance and harmonize, as in a finished speech. For it is unbecoming and highly censurable, when upon a serious theme, to introduce such jests as are proper at a dinner, or any sort of loose talk. When Pericles was associated with the poet Sophocles as his colleague in command and they had met to confer about official business that concerned them both, a handsome boy chanced to pass and Sophocles said: "Look, Pericles; what a pretty boy!" How pertinent was Pericles's reply: "Hush, Sophocles, a general should keep not only his hands but his eyes under control." And yet, if Sophocles had made this same remark at a trial of athletes, he would have incurred no just reprimand. So great is the significance of both place and circumstance. For example, if anyone, while on a journey or on a walk, should rehearse to himself a case which he is preparing to conduct in court, or if he should under similar circumstances apply his closest thought to some other subject, he would not be open to censure: but if he should do that same thing at a dinner, he would be thought ill-bred, because he ignored the proprieties of the occasion.
2. Cicero, Letters, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Letters, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Letters, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Letters, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Catullus, Poems, 65.16, 116.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 5.39.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.39.4.  Then for the first time the commonwealth, recovering from the defeat received at the hands of the Tyrrhenians, recovered its former spirit and dared as before to aim at the supremacy over its neighbours. The Romans decreed a triumph jointly to both the consuls, and, as a special gratification to one of them, Valerius, ordered that a site should be given him for his habitation on the best part of the Palatine Hill and that the cost of the building should be defrayed from the public treasury. The folding doors of this house, near which stands the brazen bull, are the only doors in Rome either of public or private buildings that open outwards.
8. Livy, History, 2.7.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Ovid, Tristia, 4.10.43 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Propertius, Elegies, 2.28.29 (1st cent. BCE

11. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.710 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed
12. Vergil, Georgics, 3.3-3.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young
13. Martial, Epigrams, 1.2, 1.70, 1.117, 2.6.2-2.6.4, 2.6.7, 2.6.10, 2.14, 2.77, 3.47, 3.50, 4.8.7-4.8.12, 4.14, 5.5, 5.16.9, 5.22, 5.78.25, 7.31, 8.61, 9.18, 9.59, 10.2, 10.4-10.5, 10.4.10, 10.48, 11.3, 11.15, 11.52, 14.183 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Martial, Epigrams, 1.2, 1.70, 1.117, 2.6.2-2.6.4, 2.6.7, 2.6.10, 2.14, 2.77, 3.47, 3.50, 4.8.7-4.8.12, 4.14, 5.5, 5.16.9, 5.22, 5.78.25, 7.31, 8.61, 9.18, 9.59, 10.2, 10.4-10.5, 10.4.10, 10.20, 10.48, 11.3, 11.15, 11.52, 14.183 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Persius, Satires, 1.32-1.43 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Persius, Saturae, 1.32-1.43 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 55 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 55 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Plutarch, Publicola, 10.2, 10.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.2. Yet why should he extol Brutus in words, while in deeds he imitates Tarquin, descending to the forum alone, escorted by all the rods and axes together, from a house no less stately than the royal house which he demolished? For, as a matter of fact, Valerius was living in a very splendid house on the so-called Velia. An eminence of the Palatine hill. It hung high over the forum, commanded a view of all that passed there, and was surrounded by steeps and hard to get at, so that when he came down from it the spectacle was a lofty one, and the pomp of his procession worthy of a king. 10.4. In the morning, therefore, the Romans saw what had happened, and came flocking together. They were moved to love and admiration by the man’s magimity, but were distressed for the house, and mourned for its stately beauty, as if it had been human, now that envy had unjustly compassed its destruction. They were also distressed for their ruler, who, like a homeless man, was now sharing the homes of others. For Valerius was received into the houses of his friends until the people gave him a site and built him a house, of more modest dimensions than the one he had lived in before, where now stands the temple of Vica Pota, Victress Possessor, a name of the goddess of victory, whose temple was at the foot of the Velia ( Livy, ii. 7, 12 ). According to Livy, Valerius was building the house on the Velia, but in order to allay the people’s jealousy, brought the materials to the foot of the hill, and built the house there. so-called.
20. Statius, Siluae, 1.3.91-1.3.92, 2.6.65-2.6.66 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Tacitus, Agricola, 46.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Gellius, Attic Nights, 19.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.15.2, 3.21.4, 7.33 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.33. To Tacitus. I venture to prophesy - and I know my prognostics are right - that your histories will be immortal, and that, I frankly confess, makes me the more anxious to figure in them. For if it is quite an ordinary thing for us to take care to secure the best painter to paint our portrait, ought we not also to be desirous of getting an author and historian of your calibre to describe our deeds ? That is why though it could hardly escape your careful eye, as it is to be found in the public records - I bring the following incident before your notice, and I do so in order to assure you how pleased I shall be, if you will lend your powers of description and the weight of your testimony to setting forth the way I behaved on an occasion when I reaped credit, owing to the dangers to which I exposed myself. The senate had appointed me to act with Herennius Senecio on behalf of the province of Baetica in the prosecution of Baebius Massa, * and, when Massa had been sentenced, it decreed that his property should be placed under public custody. Senecio came to me, after finding out that the consuls would be at liberty to hear petitions, and said My conduct on this occasion, whatever its worth may have been, will be made even more famous, more distinguished, and more noble if you describe it, although I do not ask of you to go beyond the strict letter of what actually occurred. For history ought never to transgress against truth, and an honourable action wants nothing more than to be faithfully recorded. Farewell. %%%
24. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.15.2, 3.21.4, 7.33 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.33. To Tacitus. I venture to prophesy - and I know my prognostics are right - that your histories will be immortal, and that, I frankly confess, makes me the more anxious to figure in them. For if it is quite an ordinary thing for us to take care to secure the best painter to paint our portrait, ought we not also to be desirous of getting an author and historian of your calibre to describe our deeds ? That is why though it could hardly escape your careful eye, as it is to be found in the public records - I bring the following incident before your notice, and I do so in order to assure you how pleased I shall be, if you will lend your powers of description and the weight of your testimony to setting forth the way I behaved on an occasion when I reaped credit, owing to the dangers to which I exposed myself. The senate had appointed me to act with Herennius Senecio on behalf of the province of Baetica in the prosecution of Baebius Massa, * and, when Massa had been sentenced, it decreed that his property should be placed under public custody. Senecio came to me, after finding out that the consuls would be at liberty to hear petitions, and said My conduct on this occasion, whatever its worth may have been, will be made even more famous, more distinguished, and more noble if you describe it, although I do not ask of you to go beyond the strict letter of what actually occurred. For history ought never to transgress against truth, and an honourable action wants nothing more than to be faithfully recorded. Farewell. %%%


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absence of interaction König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
aceratus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 378
agrippa, baths of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
aqua virgo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
auctus, pompeius Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 207
baths of agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
baths of titus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
bruttianus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
catasterismi (piso) Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
catullus König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212
cicero, on poetry as part of conversation Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
conspectus, value of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
descending Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
domitius apollinaris König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212
domitius marsus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330
esquiline hill Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
fama König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76, 232
gaetulicus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330
games, as recreation Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
gaze, downward Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
gift exchange König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212
hecatostylon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
hills of rome, political topography Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
hills of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
houses, location of wealthy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
isis, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
janiculum hill Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
light, of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
ligurinus, and recitations Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
literary interactions, synchronic König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
lucretius König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212
macer Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
martial, and books Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 207
martial, and catullus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330
martial, and homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 378
martial, and pliny König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212, 232
martial, and statius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330, 378
martial, and tacitus König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
martial, and the greek epigrammatic tradition Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330, 378
martial, apophoreta Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 378
martial, influence of callimachus on Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330, 378
martial, on reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
martial, talking books in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 378
martial Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 207; König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212, 232
minerva Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330
monumentality König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 76
movement in the city, descending Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
movement in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
numa König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212
ovid, and reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
palatine hill, aristocratic character Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
parallelism König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
patronage König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212
patrons, of literature Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
pedo Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 330
piso, calpurnius, catasterismi Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
pliny (the younger) König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212, 232
pliny the younger, and reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 207
pliny the younger, on books Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 207
pliny the younger, on recitations Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
poetry, and reading aloud Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
porta capena Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
portico europae Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
publicola, valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
quinn, kenneth, on oral performance Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
quintilius varus, readers, role of König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75
quotation, aloud Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
recitation, and ligurinus Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
regime-straddling König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
regime change, flavian into trajanic, blurring of König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75
saepta iulia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
self-fashioning König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 232
semiotics of visualisation König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212, 232
seneca the younger, on reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
severus Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 207
socio-literary interactions König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 212, 232
spurinna Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
subura Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
tacitus, agricola König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
tacitus König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
temple of, isis Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
time König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 75, 76
titus, baths of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
tombs Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
topography of rome, and politics Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185
topography of rome, from martial' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 66
velia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 185