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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7589
Lycophron, Alexandra, 1291


ὄλοιντο ναῦται πρῶτα Καρνῖται κύνεςMy curse, first upon the Carnite sailor hounds! the merchant wolves who carried off from Lerne the ox-eyed girl, the bull-maiden, to bring to the lord of Memphis a fatal bride, and raised the beacon of hatred for the two continents. For afterward the Curetes, Idaean boars, seeking to avenge the rape by their heavy deed of violence, carried off captive in a bull-formed vessel the Saraptian heifer to the Dictaean palace to be the bride of Asteros, the lord of Crete. Nor were they contended when they had taken like for like; but sent Teucer and his Draucian father Scamandrus a raping army to the dwelling-place of the Bebryces to war with mice; of the seed of those men Dardanus begat the authors of my race, when he married the noble Cretan maiden Arisba.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.1-1.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.1. The Persian learned men say that the Phoenicians were the cause of the dispute. These (they say) came to our seas from the sea which is called Red, and having settled in the country which they still occupy, at once began to make long voyages. Among other places to which they carried Egyptian and Assyrian merchandise, they came to Argos, ,which was at that time preeminent in every way among the people of what is now called Hellas . The Phoenicians came to Argos, and set out their cargo. ,On the fifth or sixth day after their arrival, when their wares were almost all sold, many women came to the shore and among them especially the daughter of the king, whose name was Io (according to Persians and Greeks alike), the daughter of Inachus. ,As these stood about the stern of the ship bargaining for the wares they liked, the Phoenicians incited one another to set upon them. Most of the women escaped: Io and others were seized and thrown into the ship, which then sailed away for Egypt . 1.2. In this way, the Persians say (and not as the Greeks), was how Io came to Egypt, and this, according to them, was the first wrong that was done. Next, according to their story, some Greeks (they cannot say who) landed at Tyre in Phoenicia and carried off the king's daughter Europa. These Greeks must, I suppose, have been Cretans. So far, then, the account between them was balanced. But after this (they say), it was the Greeks who were guilty of the second wrong. ,They sailed in a long ship to Aea, a city of the Colchians, and to the river Phasis : and when they had done the business for which they came, they carried off the king's daughter Medea. ,When the Colchian king sent a herald to demand reparation for the robbery and restitution of his daughter, the Greeks replied that, as they had been refused reparation for the abduction of the Argive Io, they would not make any to the Colchians.
2. Lycophron, Alexandra, 1022-1026, 1047-1055, 1087-1089, 1109, 1131, 1206-1207, 1226-1284, 1292-1295, 1362-1368, 1372-1373, 139-140, 1451-1460, 178, 216-218, 224-228, 249-257, 307, 31, 361, 379-380, 387-398, 405-408, 455, 52, 535-568, 584-585, 592-632, 684, 69-71, 712-743, 799-800, 812-813, 856-858, 911-950, 984-992, 1021 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Catullus, Poems, 66.36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Amores, 2.13.8-2.13.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.720-1.721 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.696-8.698 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acte, isthmus of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
aetia (callimachus), book, callimachus, aetia, book 4, the lock of berenice Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
alexandra, and rome Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
alexandra, dark poem Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
alexandra, guard, character of Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 107
alexandra, metre Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
alexandra, monodrama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 107
alexandra, nostoi Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
alexandra Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 107, 108
alexandra (lycophron), relationship to earlier tragedies Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
alexandra (lycophron) Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
astronomy, in lock of berenice Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
athos, mount Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
bosporus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
callimachus, on queens Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
cassandra, on past events Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
catullus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
chalcidice Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
characters, tragic/mythical, aeneas Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
characters, tragic/mythical, ajax, locrian Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 107
characters, tragic/mythical, cassandra (alexandra) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 107
characters, tragic/mythical, diomedes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
characters, tragic/mythical, menelaus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
characters, tragic/mythical, odysseus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
characters, tragic/mythical, priam Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 107
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
conditionals Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
cosmology, egyptian Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
diplomats and diplomacy, role of queens Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
du-stil, dynastic discourse, role of queens in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
fire imagery, alexandra Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
herodotus Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
io, equated with isis Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
io Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
isis Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
isis in ovids metamorphoses , restoration of male power in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 230
metre, tragedy, in the alexandra Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
paris Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
pindar Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
ptolemaic empire Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
ptolemies, and seleucids Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
queens, ptolemaic, role in dynastic discourse Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
queens, ptolemaic, role in war and diplomacy Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
queens, ptolemaic Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
seas' Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 125
selden, d. Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
sexuality , slaves, sexual exploitation of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 230
sparta Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 107
third syrian war Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213
thucydides Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 108
vergil, aeneid, isis in ovids metamorphoses and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 230
xerxes Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 213