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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 6.76
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19 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Divination, 1.101, 2.40 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.101. Saepe etiam et in proeliis Fauni auditi et in rebus turbidis veridicae voces ex occulto missae esse dicuntur; cuius generis duo sint ex multis exempla, sed maxuma: Nam non multo ante urbem captam exaudita vox est a luco Vestae, qui a Palatii radice in novam viam devexus est, ut muri et portae reficerentur; futurum esse, nisi provisum esset, ut Roma caperetur. Quod neglectum tum, cum caveri poterat, post acceptam illam maximam cladem expiatum est; ara enim Aio Loquenti, quam saeptam videmus, exadversus eum locum consecrata est. Atque etiam scriptum a multis est, cum terrae motus factus esset, ut sue plena procuratio fieret, vocem ab aede Iunonis ex arce extitisse; quocirca Iunonem illam appellatam Monetam. Haec igitur et a dis significata et a nostris maioribus iudicata contemnimus? 2.40. Et quidem illi facilius facere possunt; deos enim ipsos iocandi causa induxit Epicurus perlucidos et perflabilis et habitantis tamquam inter duos lucos sic inter duos mundos propter metum ruinarum, eosque habere putat eadem membra, quae nos, nec usum ullum habere membrorum. Ergo hic circumitione quadam deos tollens recte non dubitat divinationem tollere; sed non, ut hic sibi constat, item Stoici. Illius enim deus nihil habens nec sui nec alieni negotii non potest hominibus divinationem inpertire; vester autem deus potest non inpertire, ut nihilo minus mundum regat et hominibus consulat. 1.101. Again, we are told that fauns have often been heard in battle and that during turbulent times truly prophetic messages have been sent from mysterious places. Out of many instances of this class I shall give only two, but they are very striking. Not long before the capture of the city by the Gauls, a voice, issuing from Vestas sacred grove, which slopes from the foot of the Palatine Hill to New Road, was heard to say, the walls and gates must be repaired; unless this is done the city will be taken. Neglect of this warning, while it was possible to heed it, was atoned for after the supreme disaster had occurred; for, adjoining the grove, an altar, which is now to be seen enclosed with a hedge, was dedicated to Aius the Speaker. The other illustration has been reported by many writers. At the time of the earthquake a voice came from Junos temple on the citadel commanding that an expiatory sacrifice be made of a pregt sow. From this fact the goddess was called Juno the Adviser. Are we, then, lightly to regard these warnings which the gods have sent and our forefathers adjudged to be trustworthy?
3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.49, 1.85, 1.116-1.121, 2.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.49. Yet their form is not corporeal, but only resembles bodily substance; it does not contain blood, but the semblance of blood. "These discoveries of Epicurus are so acute in themselves and so subtly expressed that not everyone would be capable of appreciating them. Still I may rely on your intelligence, and make my exposition briefer than the subject demands. Epicurus then, as he not merely discerns abstruse and recondite things with his mind's eye, but handles them as tangible realities, teaches that the substance and nature of the gods is such that, in the first place, it is perceived not by the senses but by the mind, and not materially or individually, like the solid objects which Epicurus in virtue of their substantiality entitles steremnia; but by our perceiving images owing to their similarity and succession, because an endless train of precisely similar images arises from the innumerable atoms and streams towards the gods, our minds with the keenest feelings of pleasure fixes its gaze on these images, and so attains an understanding of the nature of a being both blessed and eternal. 1.85. Well then, if the gods do not possess the appearance of men, as I have proved, nor some such form as that of the heavenly bodies, as you are convinced, why do you hesitate to deny their existence? You do not dare to. Well, that is no doubt wise — although in this matter it is not the public that you fear, but the gods themselves: I personally am acquainted with Epicureans who worship every paltry image, albeit I am aware that according to some people's view Epicurus really abolished the gods, but nominally retained them in order not to offend the people of Athens. Thus the first of his selected aphorisms or maxims, which you call the Kyriai Doxai, runs, I believe, thus: That which is blessed and immortal neither experiences trouble nor causes it to anyone. Now there are people who think that the wording of this maxim was intentional, though really it was due to the author's inability to express himself clearly; their suspicion does an injustice to the most guileless of mankind. 1.116. 'But deity possesses an excellence and pre‑eminence which must of its own nature attract the worship of the wise.' Now how can there be any excellence in a being so engrossed in the delights of his own pleasure that he always has been, is, and will continue to be entirely idle and inactive? Furthermore how can you owe piety to a person who has bestowed nothing upon you? or how can you owe anything at all to one who has done you no service? Piety is justice towards the gods; but how can any claims of justice exist between us and them, if god and man have nothing in common? Holiness is the science of divine worship; but I fail to see why the gods should be worshipped if we neither have received nor hope to receive benefit from them. 1.117. On the other hand what reason is there for adoring the gods on the ground of our admiration for the divine nature, if we cannot see that that nature possesses any special excellence? "As for freedom from superstition, which is the favourite boast of your school, that is easy to attain when you have deprived the gods of all power; unless perchance you think that it was possible for Diagoras or Theodorus to be superstitious, who denied the existence of the gods altogether. For my part, I don't see how it was possible even for Protagoras, who was not certain either that the gods exist or that they do not. For the doctrines of all these thinkers abolish not only superstition, which implies a groundless fear of the gods, but also religion, which consists in piously worshipping them. 1.118. Take again those who have asserted that the entire notion of the immortal gods is a fiction invented by wise men in the interest of the state, to the end that those whom reason was powerless to control might be led in the path of duty by religion; surely this view was absolutely and entirely destructive of religion. Or Prodicus of Ceos,',WIDTH,)" onmouseout="nd();"º who said that the gods were personifications of things beneficial to the life of man — pray what religion was left by his theory? 1.119. Or those who teach that brave or famous or powerful men have been deified after death, and that it is these who are the real objects of the worship, prayers and adoration which we are accustomed to offer — are not they entirely devoid of all sense of religion? This theory was chiefly developed by Euhemerus, who was translated and imitated especially by our poet Ennius. Yet Euhemerus describes the death and burial of certain gods; are we then to think of him as upholding religion, or rather as utterly and entirely destroying it? I say nothing of the holy and awe‑inspiring sanctuary of Eleusis, Where tribes from earth's remotest confines seek Initiation, and I pass over Samothrace and those occult mysteries Which throngs of worshippers at dead of night In forest coverts deep do celebrate at Lemnos, since such mysteries when interpreted and rationalized prove to have more to do with natural science than with theology. 1.120. For my own part I believe that even that very eminent man Democritus, the fountain-head from which Epicurus derived the streams that watered his little garden, has no fixed opinion about the nature of the gods. At one moment he holds the view that the universe includes images endowed with divinity; at another he says that there exist in this same universe the elements from which the mind is compounded, and that these are gods; at another, that they are animate images, which are wont to exercise a beneficent or harmful influence over us; and again that they are certain vast images of such a size as to envelop and enfold the entire world. All these fancies are more worthy of Democritus's native city than of himself; 1.121. for who could form a mental picture of such images? who could adore them and deem them worthy of worship or reverence? "Epicurus however, in abolishing divine beneficence and divine benevolence, uprooted and exterminated all religion from the human heart. For while asserting the supreme goodness and excellence of the divine nature, he yet denies to god the attribute of benevolence — that is to say, he does away with that which is the most essential element of supreme goodness and excellence. For what can be better or more excellent than kindness and beneficence? Make out god to be devoid of either, and you make him devoid of all love, affection or esteem for any other being, human or divine. It follows not merely that the gods do not care for mankind, but that they have no care for one another. How much more truth there is in the Stoics, whom you censure! They hold that all wise men are friends, even when strangers to each other, since nothing is more lovable than virtue, and he that attains to it will have our esteem in whatever country he dwells. 2.6. Nor is this unaccountable or accidental; it is the result, firstly, of the fact that the gods often manifest their power in bodily presence. For instance in the Latin War, at the critical battle of Lake Regillus between the dictator Aulus Postumius and Octavius Mamilius of Tusculum, Castor and Pollux were seen fighting on horseback in our ranks. And in more modern history likewise these sons of Tyndareus brought the news of the defeat of Perses. What happened was that Publius Vatinius, the grandfather of our young contemporary, was returning to Rome by night from Reate, of which he was governor, when he was informed by two young warriors on white horses that King Perses had that very day been taken prisoner. When Vatinius carried the news to the Senate, at first he was flung into gaol on the charge of spreading an unfounded report on a matter of national concern; but afterwards a dispatch arrived from Paulus, and the date was found to tally, so the Senate bestowed upon Vatinius both a grant of land and exemption from military service. It is also recorded in history that when the Locrians won their great victory over the people of Crotona at the important battle of the River Sagra, news of the engagement was reported at the Olympic Games on the very same day. often has the sound of the voices of the Fauns, often has the apparition of a divine form compelled anyone that is not either feeble-minded or impious to admit the real presence of the gods.
4. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.13. itemque cum ita ita om. H movemur, ut in bono simus aliquo, dupliciter id contingit. nam cum ratione curatione K 1 (ũ 2 ) animus movetur placide atque constanter, tum illud gaudium dicitur; cum autem iiter et effuse animus exultat, tum illa laetitia gestiens vel nimia dici potest, quam ita definiunt: sine ratione animi elationem. quoniamque, quoniam quae X praeter K 1 (quae del. V rec ) ut bona natura adpetimus, app. KR 2? (H 367, 24) sic a malis natura declinamus, quae declinatio si cum del. Bentl. ratione fiet, cautio appelletur, appellatur K 1 V rec s eaque intellegatur in solo esse sapiente; quae autem sine ratione et cum exanimatione humili atque fracta, nominetur metus; est igitur metus a a Gr.(?) s om. X ratione aversa cautio. cautio Cic. dicere debebat: declinatio
5. Philodemus, (Pars I) \ On Piety, 766-770, 765 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Philodemus of Gadara, De Pietate \ , 27.758-27.761 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Varro, On The Latin Language, 7.36 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.6-1.9, 1.38-1.39, 1.44-1.49, 1.51, 1.54-1.69, 1.75-1.101, 1.111, 1.123, 1.127-1.148, 1.151-1.158, 1.280-1.294, 1.304, 1.730, 1.737-1.738, 1.932, 1.1014-1.1015, 1.1064, 2.1-2.66, 2.68, 2.168, 2.172, 2.434-2.435, 2.600-2.643, 2.645-2.651, 2.730, 2.967-2.968, 2.1001, 2.1039, 2.1093-2.1096, 3.1-3.2, 3.12-3.13, 3.18-3.22, 3.31-3.93, 3.116, 3.141, 3.152, 3.319-3.322, 3.371, 3.419-3.420, 3.461, 3.773, 3.821-3.823, 3.826, 3.830-3.1094, 4.1-4.41, 4.43, 4.52-4.53, 4.59, 4.64, 4.84, 4.123, 4.130, 4.333, 4.580-4.594, 4.731, 4.737-4.739, 4.759-4.767, 4.1032, 4.1060, 4.1067, 4.1233, 4.1239, 5.10-5.13, 5.45-5.46, 5.50, 5.53-5.59, 5.64-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.73-5.90, 5.111-5.112, 5.122, 5.147-5.148, 5.150-5.152, 5.165-5.173, 5.195-5.234, 5.309, 5.490-5.491, 5.557, 5.561, 5.622, 5.737-5.740, 5.751-5.770, 5.772-5.1457, 6.1-6.75, 6.77-6.422, 6.522, 6.535-6.607, 6.639-6.702, 6.1183, 6.1208-6.1214, 6.1228, 6.1276 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.379-4.380 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall
10. Vergil, Georgics, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 1.316-1.334, 1.471-1.473, 1.477-1.483, 2.491-2.492 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing
11. Plutarch, Agesilaus, 3.2-3.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 22.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

13. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 9.13, 9.49, 9.137-9.181, 9.189-9.190 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

14. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.117, 10.122-10.135 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.117. When Crates asked him whether the gods take delight in prayers and adorations, he is said to have replied, Don't put such a question in the street, simpleton, but when we are alone! It is said that Bion, when he was asked the same question whether there are gods, replied:Will you not scatter the crowd from me, O much-enduring elder?In character Stilpo was simple and unaffected, and he could readily adapt himself to the plain man. For instance, when Crates the Cynic did not answer the question put to him and only insulted the questioner, I knew, said Stilpo, that you would utter anything rather than what you ought. 10.122. Let no one be slow to seek wisdom when he is young nor weary in the search thereof when he is grown old. For no age is too early or too late for the health of the soul. And to say that the season for studying philosophy has not yet come, or that it is past and gone, is like saying that the season for happiness is not yet or that it is now no more. Therefore, both old and young ought to seek wisdom, the former in order that, as age comes over him, he may be young in good things because of the grace of what has been, and the latter in order that, while he is young, he may at the same time be old, because he has no fear of the things which are to come. So we must exercise ourselves in the things which bring happiness, since, if that be present, we have everything, and, if that be absent, all our actions are directed toward attaining it. 10.123. Those things which without ceasing I have declared unto thee, those do, and exercise thyself therein, holding them to be the elements of right life. First believe that God is a living being immortal and blessed, according to the notion of a god indicated by the common sense of mankind; and so believing, thou shalt not affirm of him aught that is foreign to his immortality or that agrees not with blessedness, but shalt believe about him whatever may uphold both his blessedness and his immortality. For verily there are gods, and the knowledge of them is manifest; but they are not such as the multitude believe, seeing that men do not steadfastly maintain the notions they form respecting them. Not the man who denies the gods worshipped by the multitude, but he who affirms of the gods what the multitude believes about them is truly impious. 10.124. For the utterances of the multitude about the gods are not true preconceptions but false assumptions; hence it is that the greatest evils happen to the wicked and the greatest blessings happen to the good from the hand of the gods, seeing that they are always favourable to their own good qualities and take pleasure in men like unto themselves, but reject as alien whatever is not of their kind.Accustom thyself to believe that death is nothing to us, for good and evil imply sentience, and death is the privation of all sentience; therefore a right understanding that death is nothing to us makes the mortality of life enjoyable, not by adding to life an illimitable time, but by taking away the yearning after immortality. 10.125. For life has no terrors for him who has thoroughly apprehended that there are no terrors for him in ceasing to live. Foolish, therefore, is the man who says that he fears death, not because it will pain when it comes, but because it pains in the prospect. Whatsoever causes no annoyance when it is present, causes only a groundless pain in the expectation. Death, therefore, the most awful of evils, is nothing to us, seeing that, when we are, death is not come, and, when death is come, we are not. It is nothing, then, either to the living or to the dead, for with the living it is not and the dead exist no longer. But in the world, at one time men shun death as the greatest of all evils, and at another time choose it as a respite from the evils in life. 10.126. The wise man does not deprecate life nor does he fear the cessation of life. The thought of life is no offence to him, nor is the cessation of life regarded as an evil. And even as men choose of food not merely and simply the larger portion, but the more pleasant, so the wise seek to enjoy the time which is most pleasant and not merely that which is longest. And he who admonishes the young to live well and the old to make a good end speaks foolishly, not merely because of the desirableness of life, but because the same exercise at once teaches to live well and to die well. Much worse is he who says that it were good not to be born, but when once one is born to pass with all speed through the gates of Hades. 10.127. For if he truly believes this, why does he not depart from life? It were easy for him to do so, if once he were firmly convinced. If he speaks only in mockery, his words are foolishness, for those who hear believe him not.We must remember that the future is neither wholly ours nor wholly not ours, so that neither must we count upon it as quite certain to come nor despair of it as quite certain not to come.We must also reflect that of desires some are natural, others are groundless; and that of the natural some are necessary as well as natural, and some natural only. And of the necessary desires some are necessary if we are to be happy, some if the body is to be rid of uneasiness, some if we are even to live. 10.128. He who has a clear and certain understanding of these things will direct every preference and aversion toward securing health of body and tranquillity of mind, seeing that this is the sum and end of a blessed life. For the end of all our actions is to be free from pain and fear, and, when once we have attained all this, the tempest of the soul is laid; seeing that the living creature has no need to go in search of something that is lacking, nor to look for anything else by which the good of the soul and of the body will be fulfilled. When we are pained because of the absence of pleasure, then, and then only, do we feel the need of pleasure. Wherefore we call pleasure the alpha and omega of a blessed life. Pleasure is our first and kindred good. 10.129. It is the starting-point of every choice and of every aversion, and to it we come back, inasmuch as we make feeling the rule by which to judge of every good thing. And since pleasure is our first and native good, for that reason we do not choose every pleasure whatsoever, but ofttimes pass over many pleasures when a greater annoyance ensues from them. And ofttimes we consider pains superior to pleasures when submission to the pains for a long time brings us as a consequence a greater pleasure. While therefore all pleasure because it is naturally akin to us is good, not all pleasure is choiceworthy, just as all pain is an evil and yet not all pain is to be shunned. 10.130. It is, however, by measuring one against another, and by looking at the conveniences and inconveniences, that all these matters must be judged. Sometimes we treat the good as an evil, and the evil, on the contrary, as a good. Again, we regard independence of outward things as a great good, not so as in all cases to use little, but so as to be contented with little if we have not much, being honestly persuaded that they have the sweetest enjoyment of luxury who stand least in need of it, and that whatever is natural is easily procured and only the vain and worthless hard to win. Plain fare gives as much pleasure as a costly diet, when once the pain of want has been removed 10.131. while bread and water confer the highest possible pleasure when they are brought to hungry lips. To habituate one's self, therefore, to simple and inexpensive diet supplies all that is needful for health, and enables a man to meet the necessary requirements of life without shrinking, and it places us in a better condition when we approach at intervals a costly fare and renders us fearless of fortune.When we say, then, that pleasure is the end and aim, we do not mean the pleasures of the prodigal or the pleasures of sensuality, as we are understood to do by some through ignorance, prejudice, or wilful misrepresentation. By pleasure we mean the absence of pain in the body and of trouble in the soul. 10.132. It is not an unbroken succession of drinking-bouts and of revelry, not sexual love, not the enjoyment of the fish and other delicacies of a luxurious table, which produce a pleasant life; it is sober reasoning, searching out the grounds of every choice and avoidance, and banishing those beliefs through which the greatest tumults take possession of the soul. of all this the beginning and the greatest good is prudence. Wherefore prudence is a more precious thing even than philosophy; from it spring all the other virtues, for it teaches that we cannot lead a life of pleasure which is not also a life of prudence, honour, and justice; nor lead a life of prudence, honour, and justice, which is not also a life of pleasure. For the virtues have grown into one with a pleasant life, and a pleasant life is inseparable from them. 10.133. Who, then, is superior in thy judgement to such a man? He holds a holy belief concerning the gods, and is altogether free from the fear of death. He has diligently considered the end fixed by nature, and understands how easily the limit of good things can be reached and attained, and how either the duration or the intensity of evils is but slight. Destiny, which some introduce as sovereign over all things, he laughs to scorn, affirming rather that some things happen of necessity, others by chance, others through our own agency. For he sees that necessity destroys responsibility and that chance or fortune is inconstant; whereas our own actions are free, and it is to them that praise and blame naturally attach. 10.134. It were better, indeed, to accept the legends of the gods than to bow beneath that yoke of destiny which the natural philosophers have imposed. The one holds out some faint hope that we may escape if we honour the gods, while the necessity of the naturalists is deaf to all entreaties. Nor does he hold chance to be a god, as the world in general does, for in the acts of a god there is no disorder; nor to be a cause, though an uncertain one, for he believes that no good or evil is dispensed by chance to men so as to make life blessed, though it supplies the starting-point of great good and great evil. He believes that the misfortune of the wise is better than the prosperity of the fool. 10.135. It is better, in short, that what is well judged in action should not owe its successful issue to the aid of chance.Exercise thyself in these and kindred precepts day and night, both by thyself and with him who is like unto thee; then never, either in waking or in dream, wilt thou be disturbed, but wilt live as a god among men. For man loses all semblance of mortality by living in the midst of immortal blessings.Elsewhere he rejects the whole of divination, as in the short epitome, and says, No means of predicting the future really exists, and if it did, we must regard what happens according to it as nothing to us.Such are his views on life and conduct; and he has discoursed upon them at greater length elsewhere.
15. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 135, 124

16. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 39, 68, 71, 75, 38

17. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 88, 115

18. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 88, 115

19. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
action, and cult Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
aetiology Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
allegory Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
altars Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
amor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88; Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
aristophanes Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223
belief, doxastic Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
belief, epicurean theory of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
belief, false Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217, 242
belief, in gods/goddesses Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
belief, religious Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
belief, theological Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
christianity Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
cicero Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 230; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 230
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
cult, action Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
cult, practices Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
cura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
democritus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
empedocles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
empiricus, sextus Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
epicureanism Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 98
epicurus, authority in the de rerum natura Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226, 227, 230, 238; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226, 227, 230, 238
epicurus, theology Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226, 227, 230, 238; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226, 227, 230, 238
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20; Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
epicurus and epicureanism Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
epiphany Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217, 242
euripides Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
fear, of death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73, 223
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 165
gods, in the aeneid Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
gods, location in epicureanism Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226, 227, 230
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods/goddesses, belief in Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
gods/goddesses, common notion of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
gods/goddesses, epiphanies of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
gods/goddesses, happiness of Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73, 223
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
horror Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
imagery, light and darkness Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 150
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
inference Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217
intention Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
julius caesar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
labor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
lucretius, devotion to epicurus Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226, 227, 230, 238
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 165
lucretius, labor in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
lucretius, theology Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226, 227, 230, 238
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 217, 242
lucretius carus, t Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 98
lucretius carus, titus Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151, 165
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120, 142
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
optimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151
parker, r. Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
philippi Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223; Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
prayer Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
proems in the middle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
psychological mode, desire Mackey, Belief and Cult: Rethinking Roman Religion (2022) 242
ratio Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 98
reader (within the poem) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223
religio Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 98
religion, greek, and philosophy, evidence of social backlash Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
religion, greek, and philosophy, philosophical criticisms and appropriations Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
religion, greek, and philosophy Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
religion, greek, tolerance and flexibility of' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
religion, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
religion Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
sedley, david Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 226
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
socrates, his trial Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
stoicism Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 46
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
superstition Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108
templum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
truth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 223
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20; Rosa and Santangelo, Cicero and Roman Religion: Eight Studies (2020) 98
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 142
virtue Wynne, Horace and the Gift Economy of Patronage (2019) 108