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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 6.670
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 203-212, 202 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

202. Might will be right and shame shall cease to be
2. Homer, Odyssey, 6.42-6.46 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, On Divination, 1.101 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.101. Saepe etiam et in proeliis Fauni auditi et in rebus turbidis veridicae voces ex occulto missae esse dicuntur; cuius generis duo sint ex multis exempla, sed maxuma: Nam non multo ante urbem captam exaudita vox est a luco Vestae, qui a Palatii radice in novam viam devexus est, ut muri et portae reficerentur; futurum esse, nisi provisum esset, ut Roma caperetur. Quod neglectum tum, cum caveri poterat, post acceptam illam maximam cladem expiatum est; ara enim Aio Loquenti, quam saeptam videmus, exadversus eum locum consecrata est. Atque etiam scriptum a multis est, cum terrae motus factus esset, ut sue plena procuratio fieret, vocem ab aede Iunonis ex arce extitisse; quocirca Iunonem illam appellatam Monetam. Haec igitur et a dis significata et a nostris maioribus iudicata contemnimus? 1.101. Again, we are told that fauns have often been heard in battle and that during turbulent times truly prophetic messages have been sent from mysterious places. Out of many instances of this class I shall give only two, but they are very striking. Not long before the capture of the city by the Gauls, a voice, issuing from Vestas sacred grove, which slopes from the foot of the Palatine Hill to New Road, was heard to say, the walls and gates must be repaired; unless this is done the city will be taken. Neglect of this warning, while it was possible to heed it, was atoned for after the supreme disaster had occurred; for, adjoining the grove, an altar, which is now to be seen enclosed with a hedge, was dedicated to Aius the Speaker. The other illustration has been reported by many writers. At the time of the earthquake a voice came from Junos temple on the citadel commanding that an expiatory sacrifice be made of a pregt sow. From this fact the goddess was called Juno the Adviser. Are we, then, lightly to regard these warnings which the gods have sent and our forefathers adjudged to be trustworthy?
4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.6, 2.98-2.100 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.6. Nor is this unaccountable or accidental; it is the result, firstly, of the fact that the gods often manifest their power in bodily presence. For instance in the Latin War, at the critical battle of Lake Regillus between the dictator Aulus Postumius and Octavius Mamilius of Tusculum, Castor and Pollux were seen fighting on horseback in our ranks. And in more modern history likewise these sons of Tyndareus brought the news of the defeat of Perses. What happened was that Publius Vatinius, the grandfather of our young contemporary, was returning to Rome by night from Reate, of which he was governor, when he was informed by two young warriors on white horses that King Perses had that very day been taken prisoner. When Vatinius carried the news to the Senate, at first he was flung into gaol on the charge of spreading an unfounded report on a matter of national concern; but afterwards a dispatch arrived from Paulus, and the date was found to tally, so the Senate bestowed upon Vatinius both a grant of land and exemption from military service. It is also recorded in history that when the Locrians won their great victory over the people of Crotona at the important battle of the River Sagra, news of the engagement was reported at the Olympic Games on the very same day. often has the sound of the voices of the Fauns, often has the apparition of a divine form compelled anyone that is not either feeble-minded or impious to admit the real presence of the gods. 2.98. For we may now put aside elaborate argument and gaze as it were with our eyes upon the beauty of the creations of divine providence, as we declare them to be. And first let us behold the whole earth, situated in the centre of the world, a solid spherical mass gathered into a globe by the natural gravitation of all its parts, clothed with flowers and grass and trees and corn,º forms of vegetation all of them incredibly numerous and inexhaustibly varied and diverse. Add to these cool fountains ever flowing, transparent streams and rivers, their banks clad in brightest verdure, deep vaulted caverns, craggy rocks, sheer mountain heights and plains of immeasurable extent; add also the hidden veins of gold and silver, and marble in unlimited quantity. 2.99. Think of all the various species of animals, both tame and wild! think of the flights and songs of birds! of the pastures filled with cattle, and the teeming life of the woodlands! Then why need I speak of the race of men? who are as it were the appointed tillers of the soil, and who suffer it not to become a savage haunt of monstrous beasts of prey nor a barren waste of thickets and brambles, and whose industry diversifies and adorns the lands and islands and coasts with houses and cities. Could we but behold these things with our eyes as we can picture them in our minds, no one taking in the whole earth at one view could doubt the divine reason. 2.100. Then how great is the beauty of the sea! how glorious the aspect of its vast expanse! him many and how diverse its islands! how lovely the scenery of its coasts and shores! how numerous and how different the species of marine animals, some dwelling in the depths, some floating and swimming on the surface, some clinging in their own shells to the rocks! And the sea itself, yearning for the earth, sports against her shores in such a fashion that the two elements appear to be fused into one.
5. Varro, On The Latin Language, 7.36 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.38, 1.123, 1.250-1.261, 1.280-1.294, 1.730, 1.737-1.738, 1.1014-1.1015, 1.1064, 2.600-2.643, 2.645, 2.1001, 2.1039, 3.18-3.22, 3.26-3.30, 3.371, 4.43, 4.580-4.594, 4.759-4.767, 5.78-5.82, 5.111-5.112, 5.490-5.491, 5.622, 5.737-5.740, 5.751-5.770, 5.1191, 5.1204, 6.48-6.91, 6.96-6.422, 6.535-6.669, 6.671-6.737, 6.1090-6.1097, 6.1117-6.1124, 6.1132, 6.1228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.227-2.234, 2.401-2.403 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Vergil, Georgics, 1.60-1.61, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 1.466, 1.468, 1.470-1.473, 1.475, 1.477-1.483, 1.487 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.60. And teach the furrow-burnished share to shine. 1.61. That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils 1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.466. Or light chaff flit in air with fallen leaves 1.468. But when from regions of the furious North 1.470. of Eurus and of Zephyr, all the field 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.475. Flee to the vales before it, with face 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 1.487. Cayster, as in eager rivalry
9. Longinus, On The Sublime, 35.3-35.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 51.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.23.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.23.9. The craters in Aetna have the same feature; for they lower into them objects of gold and silver and also all kinds of victims. If the fire receives and consumes them, they rejoice at the appearance of a good sign, but if it casts up what has been thrown in, they think misfortune will befall the man to whom this happens.
12. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetna, mt. Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 160
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
boileau-despréaux, nicolas Williams, The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions' (2012) 222
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
campania Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 342
delphi Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
democritus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
ekpyrōsis Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
empedocles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 341
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
epicureanism Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
erren, manfred, erupting volcano, topos of Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
georgics , language of science in Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 160
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
great mother (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
julius caesar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
lucretius, on irregular occurrences Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 160
lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 342; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
lucretius carus, t. Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255
magna mater (cybele) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
metamorphoses, memnon and the memnonides Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
metamorphoses, phaethon Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
mount vesuvius Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 342
mt. etna Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
myth of er, theory of Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255
nelis, damien Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
nicolson, marjorie hope Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 341, 342
numinousness, conveyed in poetry Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
palingenesis Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
paths, symbolic significance of Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 341
phaethon Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
philippi Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
portents, as divine signs Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 160
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
portents at death of Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 160
ps-longinus Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255
religions, roman, lucretius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
religions, roman Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
sanctus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
schiller, friedrich Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255
science, language of, for sign theory Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 160
senate, meets in temples Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
seneca, l. annaeus Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255
sicily Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
signs, as portents Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 160
sublime/sublimity Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255
templum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
theophrastus Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 341
venus, and mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 222
vergil Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 229
virgil Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255
void' Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 255