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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 6.50-6.55
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.101 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.101. Saepe etiam et in proeliis Fauni auditi et in rebus turbidis veridicae voces ex occulto missae esse dicuntur; cuius generis duo sint ex multis exempla, sed maxuma: Nam non multo ante urbem captam exaudita vox est a luco Vestae, qui a Palatii radice in novam viam devexus est, ut muri et portae reficerentur; futurum esse, nisi provisum esset, ut Roma caperetur. Quod neglectum tum, cum caveri poterat, post acceptam illam maximam cladem expiatum est; ara enim Aio Loquenti, quam saeptam videmus, exadversus eum locum consecrata est. Atque etiam scriptum a multis est, cum terrae motus factus esset, ut sue plena procuratio fieret, vocem ab aede Iunonis ex arce extitisse; quocirca Iunonem illam appellatam Monetam. Haec igitur et a dis significata et a nostris maioribus iudicata contemnimus? 1.101. Again, we are told that fauns have often been heard in battle and that during turbulent times truly prophetic messages have been sent from mysterious places. Out of many instances of this class I shall give only two, but they are very striking. Not long before the capture of the city by the Gauls, a voice, issuing from Vestas sacred grove, which slopes from the foot of the Palatine Hill to New Road, was heard to say, the walls and gates must be repaired; unless this is done the city will be taken. Neglect of this warning, while it was possible to heed it, was atoned for after the supreme disaster had occurred; for, adjoining the grove, an altar, which is now to be seen enclosed with a hedge, was dedicated to Aius the Speaker. The other illustration has been reported by many writers. At the time of the earthquake a voice came from Junos temple on the citadel commanding that an expiatory sacrifice be made of a pregt sow. From this fact the goddess was called Juno the Adviser. Are we, then, lightly to regard these warnings which the gods have sent and our forefathers adjudged to be trustworthy?
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.6. Nor is this unaccountable or accidental; it is the result, firstly, of the fact that the gods often manifest their power in bodily presence. For instance in the Latin War, at the critical battle of Lake Regillus between the dictator Aulus Postumius and Octavius Mamilius of Tusculum, Castor and Pollux were seen fighting on horseback in our ranks. And in more modern history likewise these sons of Tyndareus brought the news of the defeat of Perses. What happened was that Publius Vatinius, the grandfather of our young contemporary, was returning to Rome by night from Reate, of which he was governor, when he was informed by two young warriors on white horses that King Perses had that very day been taken prisoner. When Vatinius carried the news to the Senate, at first he was flung into gaol on the charge of spreading an unfounded report on a matter of national concern; but afterwards a dispatch arrived from Paulus, and the date was found to tally, so the Senate bestowed upon Vatinius both a grant of land and exemption from military service. It is also recorded in history that when the Locrians won their great victory over the people of Crotona at the important battle of the River Sagra, news of the engagement was reported at the Olympic Games on the very same day. often has the sound of the voices of the Fauns, often has the apparition of a divine form compelled anyone that is not either feeble-minded or impious to admit the real presence of the gods.
3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 4.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.13. itemque cum ita ita om. H movemur, ut in bono simus aliquo, dupliciter id contingit. nam cum ratione curatione K 1 (ũ 2 ) animus movetur placide atque constanter, tum illud gaudium dicitur; cum autem iiter et effuse animus exultat, tum illa laetitia gestiens vel nimia dici potest, quam ita definiunt: sine ratione animi elationem. quoniamque, quoniam quae X praeter K 1 (quae del. V rec ) ut bona natura adpetimus, app. KR 2? (H 367, 24) sic a malis natura declinamus, quae declinatio si cum del. Bentl. ratione fiet, cautio appelletur, appellatur K 1 V rec s eaque intellegatur in solo esse sapiente; quae autem sine ratione et cum exanimatione humili atque fracta, nominetur metus; est igitur metus a a Gr.(?) s om. X ratione aversa cautio. cautio Cic. dicere debebat: declinatio
4. Varro, On The Latin Language, 7.36 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.6-1.9, 1.39, 1.51, 1.54-1.79, 1.111, 1.123, 1.127-1.145, 1.151-1.158, 1.280-1.294, 2.1-2.66, 2.168, 2.172, 2.623, 2.730, 2.967-2.968, 2.1091-2.1104, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.1-3.2, 3.12-3.13, 3.22, 3.31-3.93, 3.116, 3.141, 3.152, 3.419-3.420, 3.461, 3.773, 3.826, 3.830-3.1094, 4.1-4.41, 4.43, 4.580-4.594, 4.759-4.767, 4.1060, 4.1067, 5.10-5.12, 5.45-5.46, 5.50, 5.54-5.59, 5.64-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.73-5.90, 5.110-5.125, 5.165-5.173, 5.195-5.234, 5.737-5.740, 5.751-5.770, 5.772-5.1457, 6.1-6.49, 6.51-6.422, 6.535-6.607, 6.639-6.702, 6.1183, 6.1208-6.1214 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.379-4.380 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.379. “Dost thou for lofty Carthage toil, to build 4.380. foundations strong? Dost thou, a wife's weak thrall
7. Vergil, Georgics, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 1.316-1.334, 1.471-1.473, 1.477-1.483, 2.491-2.492 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.471. With brimming dikes are flooded, and at sea 1.472. No mariner but furls his dripping sails. 1.473. Never at unawares did shower annoy: 1.477. Through gaping nostrils, or about the mere 1.478. Shrill-twittering flits the swallow, and the frog 1.479. Crouch in the mud and chant their dirge of old. 1.480. oft, too, the ant from out her inmost cells 1.481. Fretting the narrow path, her eggs conveys; 1.482. Or the huge bow sucks moisture; or a host 1.483. of rooks from food returning in long line 2.491. Where'er the god hath turned his comely head. 2.492. Therefore to Bacchus duly will we sing
8. Epicurus, Letter To Menoeceus, 124

9. Epicurus, Letter To Herodotus, 71, 75, 68

10. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 88, 115

11. Epicurus, Letters, 116, 88, 115

12. Epicurus, Kuriai Doxai, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
amor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
astronomy, astronomers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
ataraxia Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
babblers, garrulity, loquacity Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
beard, mary Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
bible Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
bishop Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
body Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 263
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
cicero Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
cosmology, epicurean Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 263
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
crawford, michael Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
cura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
ennius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
fear, of death Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
frogs Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 165; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
gods, in the aeneid Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 73
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
heaven, epicurean Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 263
imagery, light and darkness Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 150
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
julius caesar Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
labor, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 165
lucretius, labor in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
lucretius Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
lucretius carus, t. Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 263
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150, 151, 165
missionaries Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
monastery of bobbio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
optimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151
orthodoxy, orthodox Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
philippi Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 150
poetry, poets Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
portents Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
proems in the middle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
prostitution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
religio Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
religion, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 120
roman republic Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
schools Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 271
seneca, l. annaeus Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 263
servius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 151
space Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 263
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 165
sublime/sublimity' Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 263
superstitio, in lucretius epicureanism Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 63
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20