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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 6.1-6.28


nanBOOK VI: PROEM 'Twas Athens first, the glorious in name, That whilom gave to hapless sons of men The sheaves of harvest, and re-ordered life, And decreed laws; and she the first that gave Life its sweet solaces, when she begat A man of heart so wise, who whilom poured All wisdom forth from his truth-speaking mouth; The glory of whom, though dead, is yet to-day, Because of those discoveries divine Renowned of old, exalted to the sky. For when saw he that well-nigh everything Which needs of man most urgently require Was ready to hand for mortals, and that life, As far as might be, was established safe, That men were lords in riches, honour, praise, And eminent in goodly fame of sons, And that they yet, O yet, within the home, Still had the anxious heart which vexed life Unpausingly with torments of the mind, And raved perforce with angry plaints, then he, Then he, the master, did perceive that 'twas The vessel itself which worked the bane, and all, However wholesome, which from here or there Was gathered into it, was by that bane Spoilt from within,- in part, because he saw The vessel so cracked and leaky that nowise 'T could ever be filled to brim; in part because He marked how it polluted with foul taste Whate'er it got within itself. So he, The master, then by his truth-speaking words, Purged the breasts of men, and set the bounds Of lust and terror, and exhibited The supreme good whither we all endeavour, And showed the path whereby we might arrive Thereunto by a little cross-cut straight, And what of ills in all affairs of mortals Upsprang and flitted deviously about (Whether by chance or force), since nature thus Had destined; and from out what gates a man Should sally to each combat. And he proved That mostly vainly doth the human race Roll in its bosom the grim waves of care. For just as children tremble and fear all In the viewless dark, so even we at times Dread in the light so many things that be No whit more fearsome than what children feign, Shuddering, will be upon them in the dark. This terror then, this darkness of the mind, Not sunrise with its flaring spokes of light, Nor glittering arrows of morning can disperse, But only nature's aspect and her law. Wherefore the more will I go on to weave In verses this my undertaken task.


Primae frugiparos fetus mortalibus aegrisBOOK VI: PROEM 'Twas Athens first, the glorious in name, That whilom gave to hapless sons of men The sheaves of harvest, and re-ordered life, And decreed laws; and she the first that gave Life its sweet solaces, when she begat A man of heart so wise, who whilom poured All wisdom forth from his truth-speaking mouth; The glory of whom, though dead, is yet to-day, Because of those discoveries divine Renowned of old, exalted to the sky. For when saw he that well-nigh everything Which needs of man most urgently require Was ready to hand for mortals, and that life, As far as might be, was established safe, That men were lords in riches, honour, praise, And eminent in goodly fame of sons, And that they yet, O yet, within the home, Still had the anxious heart which vexed life Unpausingly with torments of the mind, And raved perforce with angry plaints, then he, Then he, the master, did perceive that 'twas The vessel itself which worked the bane, and all, However wholesome, which from here or there Was gathered into it, was by that bane Spoilt from within,- in part, because he saw The vessel so cracked and leaky that nowise 'T could ever be filled to brim; in part because He marked how it polluted with foul taste Whate'er it got within itself. So he, The master, then by his truth-speaking words, Purged the breasts of men, and set the bounds Of lust and terror, and exhibited The supreme good whither we all endeavour, And showed the path whereby we might arrive Thereunto by a little cross-cut straight, And what of ills in all affairs of mortals Upsprang and flitted deviously about (Whether by chance or force), since nature thus Had destined; and from out what gates a man Should sally to each combat. And he proved That mostly vainly doth the human race Roll in its bosom the grim waves of care. For just as children tremble and fear all In the viewless dark, so even we at times Dread in the light so many things that be No whit more fearsome than what children feign, Shuddering, will be upon them in the dark. This terror then, this darkness of the mind, Not sunrise with its flaring spokes of light, Nor glittering arrows of morning can disperse, But only nature's aspect and her law. Wherefore the more will I go on to weave In verses this my undertaken task.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.144-2.148, 20.226-20.229 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.144. /let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main 2.145. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.146. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.147. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.148. /which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 20.226. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.227. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.228. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine. 20.229. /and they conceived, and bare twelve fillies These, when they bounded over the earth, the giver of grain, would course over the topmost ears of ripened corn and break them not, and whenso they bounded over the broad back of the sea, would course over the topmost breakers of the hoary brine.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 21.295-21.304 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.1259-3.1261 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1259. ὡς δʼ ὅτʼ ἀρήιος ἵππος ἐελδόμενος πολέμοιο 3.1260. σκαρθμῷ ἐπιχρεμέθων κρούει πέδον, αὐτὰρ ὕπερθεν 3.1261. κυδιόων ὀρθοῖσιν ἐπʼ οὔασιν αὐχένʼ ἀείρει·
4. Cicero, On Laws, 1.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.95-5.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.95. Totumque fr. 439 hoc de voluptate sic ille praecipit, ut voluptatem ipsam per se, quia voluptas sit, semper optandam et et add. s cf. p. 423, 4 de orat. 1, 231 al. (asyndeton ipsum tolerari potest cf. exsibilatur exploditur parad. 26) expetendam putet, eademque ratione dolorem ob id ipsum, quia dolor sit, semper esse fugiendum; itaque hac usurum compensatione conpensatione K sapientem, ut et ut et s ut om. X et om. voluptatem fugiat, si ea eam maiorem dolorem effectura sit, et dolorem suscipiat maiorem efficientem voluptatem; omniaque iucunda, iocunda GR 1 ( ss. 1 ) quamquam sensu corporis iudicentur, ad animum referri tamen. 5.96. quocirca corpus gaudere tam diu, dum praesentem sentiret voluptatem, animum et praesentem percipere pariter cum corpore et prospicere venientem nec praeteritam praeterfluere sinere. ita perpetuas et contextas contestas ex contentas K c voluptates in sapiente fore semper, cum expectatio expectatione G 1 speratarum voluptatum cum cum add. Lb. perceptarum memoria iungeretur.
6. Catullus, Poems, 76 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.6-1.9, 1.39, 1.54-1.145, 1.161-1.179, 1.192-1.195, 1.208-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.264, 1.272, 1.400-1.417, 1.584-1.586, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.1-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.263-2.265, 2.352-2.366, 2.569-2.580, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.1-3.2, 3.12-3.13, 3.22, 3.31-3.93, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.830, 3.964-3.971, 4.1-4.41, 4.43, 4.733-4.734, 4.760-4.761, 5.9-5.12, 5.54-5.59, 5.64-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.73-5.90, 5.165-5.173, 5.195-5.508, 5.772-5.1457, 6.2-6.422, 6.624, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 6.277 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.277. Rustled in each light breeze. Aeneas grasped
9. Vergil, Georgics, 1.14-1.15, 1.33, 1.133, 1.176-1.186, 1.199-1.203, 1.229, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 2.1-2.3, 2.103-2.108, 2.113, 2.143-2.144, 2.275, 2.278-2.279, 2.370, 2.380-2.396, 2.455, 2.458-2.474, 2.490, 3.64-3.68, 3.70, 3.77, 3.81-3.82, 3.89-3.100, 3.102, 3.115-3.117, 3.158, 3.196, 3.266-3.268, 3.478-3.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.14. And Dryad-maids together; your gifts I sing. 1.15. And thou, for whose delight the war-horse first 1.33. Whether to watch o'er cities be thy will 1.133. And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.176. And hem with hounds the mighty forest-glades. 1.177. Soon one with hand-net scourges the broad stream 1.178. Probing its depths, one drags his dripping toil 1.179. Along the main; then iron's unbending might 1.180. And shrieking saw-blade,—for the men of old 1.181. With wedges wont to cleave the splintering log;— 1.182. Then divers arts arose; toil conquered all 1.183. Remorseless toil, and poverty's shrewd push 1.184. In times of hardship. Ceres was the first 1.185. Set mortals on with tools to turn the sod 1.186. When now the awful groves 'gan fail to bear 1.199. Alack! thy neighbour's heaped-up harvest-mow 1.200. And in the greenwood from a shaken oak 1.201. Seek solace for thine hunger. 1.202. Now to tell 1.203. The sturdy rustics' weapons, what they are 1.229. Lest weeds arise, or dust a passage win 1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 2.1. Thus far the tilth of fields and stars of heaven; 2.2. Now will I sing thee, Bacchus, and, with thee 2.3. The forest's young plantations and the fruit 2.103. Wherein from some strange tree a germ they pen 2.104. And to the moist rind bid it cleave and grow. 2.105. Or, otherwise, in knotless trunks is hewn 2.106. A breach, and deep into the solid grain 2.107. A path with wedges cloven; then fruitful slip 2.108. Are set herein, and—no long time—behold! 2.113. of Ida; nor of self-same fashion spring 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.275. So rife with serpent-dainties, or that yield 2.278. Drinks moisture up and casts it forth at will 2.279. Which, ever in its own green grass arrayed 2.370. The tree that props it, aesculus in chief 2.380. Nor midst the vines plant hazel; neither take 2.381. The topmost shoots for cuttings, nor from the top 2.382. of the supporting tree your suckers tear; 2.383. So deep their love of earth; nor wound the plant 2.384. With blunted blade; nor truncheons intersperse 2.385. of the wild olive: for oft from careless swain 2.386. A spark hath fallen, that, 'neath the unctuous rind 2.387. Hid thief-like first, now grips the tough tree-bole 2.388. And mounting to the leaves on high, sends forth 2.389. A roar to heaven, then coursing through the bough 2.390. And airy summits reigns victoriously 2.391. Wraps all the grove in robes of fire, and gro 2.392. With pitch-black vapour heaves the murky reek 2.393. Skyward, but chiefly if a storm has swooped 2.394. Down on the forest, and a driving wind 2.395. Rolls up the conflagration. When 'tis so 2.396. Their root-force fails them, nor, when lopped away 2.455. From story up to story. 2.458. Forbear their frailty, and while yet the bough 2.459. Shoots joyfully toward heaven, with loosened rein 2.460. Launched on the void, assail it not as yet 2.461. With keen-edged sickle, but let the leaves alone 2.462. Be culled with clip of fingers here and there. 2.463. But when they clasp the elms with sturdy trunk 2.464. Erect, then strip the leaves off, prune the boughs; 2.465. Sooner they shrink from steel, but then put forth 2.466. The arm of power, and stem the branchy tide. 2.467. Hedges too must be woven and all beast 2.468. Barred entrance, chiefly while the leaf is young 2.469. And witless of disaster; for therewith 2.470. Beside harsh winters and o'erpowering sun 2.471. Wild buffaloes and pestering goats for ay 2.472. Besport them, sheep and heifers glut their greed. 2.473. Nor cold by hoar-frost curdled, nor the prone 2.474. Dead weight of summer upon the parched crags 2.490. Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound 3.64. If eager for the prized Olympian palm 3.65. One breed the horse, or bullock strong to plough 3.66. Be his prime care a shapely dam to choose. 3.67. of kine grim-faced is goodliest, with coarse head 3.68. And burly neck, whose hanging dewlaps reach 3.70. Large every way she is, large-footed even 3.77. The age for Hymen's rites, Lucina's pangs 3.81. Survives within them, loose the males: be first 3.82. To speed thy herds of cattle to their loves 3.89. Renew them still; with yearly choice of young 3.90. Preventing losses, lest too late thou rue. 3.91. Nor steeds crave less selection; but on those 3.92. Thou think'st to rear, the promise of their line 3.93. From earliest youth thy chiefest pains bestow. 3.94. See from the first yon high-bred colt afield 3.95. His lofty step, his limbs' elastic tread: 3.96. Dauntless he leads the herd, still first to try 3.97. The threatening flood, or brave the unknown bridge 3.98. By no vain noise affrighted; lofty-necked 3.99. With clean-cut head, short belly, and stout back; 3.100. His sprightly breast exuberant with brawn. 3.102. And sorrel. Then lo! if arms are clashed afar 3.115. The heights of 3.116. Even him, when sore disease or sluggish eld 3.117. Now saps his strength, pen fast at home, and spare 3.158. The herd itself of purpose they reduce 3.196. And which to rear for breeding, or devote 3.266. With her sweet charms can lovers proud compel 3.267. To battle for the conquest horn to horn. 3.268. In Sila's forest feeds the heifer fair 3.478. Many there be who from their mothers keep 3.479. The new-born kids, and straightway bind their mouth 3.480. With iron-tipped muzzles. What they milk at dawn 3.481. Or in the daylight hours, at night they press; 3.482. What darkling or at sunset, this ere morn 3.483. They bear away in baskets—for to town 3.484. The shepherd hies him—or with dash of salt 3.485. Just sprinkle, and lay by for winter use. 3.486. Nor be thy dogs last cared for; but alike 3.487. Swift Spartan hounds and fierce Molossian feed 3.488. On fattening whey. Never, with these to watch 3.489. Dread nightly thief afold and ravening wolves 3.490. Or Spanish desperadoes in the rear. 3.491. And oft the shy wild asses thou wilt chase 3.492. With hounds, too, hunt the hare, with hounds the doe; 3.493. oft from his woodland wallowing-den uprouse 3.494. The boar, and scare him with their baying, and drive 3.495. And o'er the mountains urge into the toil 3.496. Some antlered monster to their chiming cry. 3.497. Learn also scented cedar-wood to burn 3.498. Within the stalls, and snakes of noxious smell 3.499. With fumes of galbanum to drive away. 3.500. oft under long-neglected cribs, or lurk 3.501. A viper ill to handle, that hath fled 3.502. The light in terror, or some snake, that wont 3.503. 'Neath shade and sheltering roof to creep, and shower 3.504. Its bane among the cattle, hugs the ground 3.505. Fell scourge of kine. Shepherd, seize stakes, seize stones! 3.506. And as he rears defiance, and puffs out 3.507. A hissing throat, down with him! see how low 3.508. That cowering crest is vailed in flight, the while 3.509. His midmost coils and final sweep of tail 3.510. Relaxing, the last fold drags lingering spires. 3.511. Then that vile worm that in Calabrian glade 3.512. Uprears his breast, and wreathes a scaly back 3.513. His length of belly pied with mighty spots— 3.514. While from their founts gush any streams, while yet 3.515. With showers of Spring and rainy south-winds earth 3.516. Is moistened, lo! he haunts the pools, and here 3.517. Housed in the banks, with fish and chattering frog 3.518. Crams the black void of his insatiate maw. 3.519. Soon as the fens are parched, and earth with heat 3.520. Is gaping, forth he darts into the dry 3.521. Rolls eyes of fire and rages through the fields 3.522. Furious from thirst and by the drought dismayed. 3.523. Me list not then beneath the open heaven 3.524. To snatch soft slumber, nor on forest-ridge 3.525. Lie stretched along the grass, when, slipped his slough 3.526. To glittering youth transformed he winds his spires 3.527. And eggs or younglings leaving in his lair 3.528. Towers sunward, lightening with three-forked tongue. 3.529. of sickness, too, the causes and the sign 3.530. I'll teach thee. Loathly scab assails the sheep 3.531. When chilly showers have probed them to the quick 3.532. And winter stark with hoar-frost, or when sweat 3.533. Unpurged cleaves to them after shearing done 3.534. And rough thorns rend their bodies. Hence it i 3.535. Shepherds their whole flock steep in running streams 3.536. While, plunged beneath the flood, with drenched fell 3.537. The ram, launched free, goes drifting down the tide. 3.538. Else, having shorn, they smear their bodies o'er 3.539. With acrid oil-lees, and mix silver-scum 3.540. And native sulphur and Idaean pitch 3.541. Wax mollified with ointment, and therewith 3.542. Sea-leek, strong hellebores, bitumen black. 3.543. Yet ne'er doth kindlier fortune crown his toil 3.544. Than if with blade of iron a man dare lance 3.545. The ulcer's mouth ope: for the taint is fed 3.546. And quickened by confinement; while the swain 3.547. His hand of healing from the wound withholds 3.548. Or sits for happier signs imploring heaven. 3.549. Aye, and when inward to the bleater's bone 3.550. The pain hath sunk and rages, and their limb 3.551. By thirsty fever are consumed, 'tis good 3.552. To draw the enkindled heat therefrom, and pierce 3.553. Within the hoof-clefts a blood-bounding vein. 3.554. of tribes Bisaltic such the wonted use 3.555. And keen Gelonian, when to 3.556. He flies, or Getic desert, and quaffs milk 3.557. With horse-blood curdled. Seest one far afield 3.558. oft to the shade's mild covert win, or pull 3.559. The grass tops listlessly, or hindmost lag 3.560. Or, browsing, cast her down amid the plain 3.561. At night retire belated and alone; 3.562. With quick knife check the mischief, ere it creep 3.563. With dire contagion through the unwary herd. 3.564. Less thick and fast the whirlwind scours the main 3.565. With tempest in its wake, than swarm the plague 3.566. of cattle; nor seize they single lives alone
10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 90.8, 90.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
alexander the great Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
allegory Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
aloadae Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
amor, in georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 177, 262
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
animals, sacrificial Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
animals Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47, 177, 262
anthropomorphism Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 328; Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
apollonius rhodius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
arma Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
ars Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 328
athens, athenians Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 47, 73; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
atomism Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
atoms, nature/properties of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
bacchus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
bible, responses to Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47, 262
catullus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 262
chiron Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
cicero Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
cosmology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
cosmos/universe Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 47, 177
death, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 177
death Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
desire Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
diana Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
digression Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
epicureanism, ethics of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
epicureans, epicureanism Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
epicurus/epicureanism, hedonic calculus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
epicurus/epicureanism Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 328; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 82; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
eratosthenes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 82
evolution Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
fear, freedom from Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
finales, book 2 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
finales, book 3 Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 22, 47
friendship Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
giants, glaucus, mares of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
god/goddess Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 82
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
goodness, good life Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
happiness Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 177
homeric similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47, 73, 177, 262
hunting Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327, 328
image, military Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 328
imagery, light and darkness Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
imagery, storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 262
inspiration Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
judgement, as basis of emotions, suspension of, see justice Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
labor, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47, 177
lapiths Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 47, 177
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 177
lucretius, religion in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
lucretius Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
mars, horses of Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
melampus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
militarism/warfare Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
mind Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
muses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
narrative Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 177
order Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
ovid, and epicurus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
ovid, hedonic calculus in Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
paradox Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
philodemus Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22, 47, 262
plato, and the cave allegory Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
plato Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
political geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
politics Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 22, 47
proems in the middle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
religion, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 47
religion Sattler, Ancient Ethics and the Natural World (2021) 67
rome Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 166
sex Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 328
sight/vision Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
social philosophy Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
structure Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327
time Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
truth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56
tsouna, voula Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 65
varro Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 20, 22
vines Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 82
vituperatio vitis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 262
war/warfare Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 327, 328
wealth' Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 185
wine Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 73, 262
zeno Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 56