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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



7574
Lucretius Carus, On The Nature Of Things, 5.920-5.924
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Aristophanes, Clouds, 347-350, 346 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

346. ἤδη ποτ' ἀναβλέψας εἶδες νεφέλην κενταύρῳ ὁμοίαν
2. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.672-4.682 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.672. θῆρες δʼ οὐ θήρεσσιν ἐοικότες ὠμηστῇσιν 4.673. οὐδὲ μὲν οὐδʼ ἄνδρεσσιν ὁμὸν δέμας, ἄλλο δʼ ἀπʼ ἄλλων 4.674. συμμιγέες μελέων, κίον ἀθρόοι, ἠύτε μῆλα 4.675. ἐκ σταθμῶν ἅλις εἶσιν ὀπηδεύοντα νομῆι. 4.676. τοίους καὶ προτέρης ἐξ ἰλύος ἐβλάστησε 4.677. χθὼν αὐτὴ μικτοῖσιν ἀρηρεμένους μελέεσσιν 4.678. οὔπω διψαλέῳ μάλʼ ὑπʼ ἠέρι πιληθεῖσα 4.679. οὐδέ πω ἀζαλέοιο βολαῖς τόσον ἠελίοιο 4.680. ἰκμάδας αἰνυμένη· τὰ δʼ ἐπὶ στίχας ἤγαγεν αἰὼν 4.681. συγκρίνας· τὼς οἵγε φυὴν ἀίδηλοι ἕποντο. 4.682. ἥρωας δʼ ἕλε θάμβος ἀπείριτον· αἶψα δʼ ἕκαστος
4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.5. how is the latter fact more evident than the former? Nothing but the presence in our minds of a firmly grasped concept of the deity could account for the stability and permanence of our belief in him, a belief which is only strengthened by the passage of the ages and grows more deeply rooted with each successive generation of mankind. In every other case we see that fictitious and unfounded opinions have dwindled away with lapse of time. Who believes that the Hippocentaur or the Chimaera ever existed? Where can you find an old wife senseless enough to be afraid of the monsters of the lower world that were once believed in? The years obliterate the inventions of the imagination, but confirm the judgements of nature. "Hence both in our own nation and among all others reverence for the gods and respect for religion grow continually stronger and more profound.
5. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.10-1.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.10. num nunc ex. num K 1 te illa terrent, triceps apud inferos Cerberus, Cocyti coyc ti R 1 fremitus, travectio traiectio ex trav. K 1 transv. V c mg. ('al trans') g Trag. inc.111 Acherontis, mento summam aquam aquam trisyll. cf. Lachm. ad Lucr. 6, 552 quam Nonii L 1 A A attingens amnem Bue. adtinget ( vel -it) senextus Nonii L 1 A A enectus siti Tantalus? summam... tantalus Non. 401,29 enectus ... Tantalus Prisc, GL 2, 470, 18 tantulus X ( corr. K 2 ) Nonii et Prisciani pars tum illud, quod Sisyphus sisyphius X ( sed 2. eras. in V. sis. K 1 aut c ) Nonii pars versat versus? cf. Marx ad Lucil. 1375 saxum sudans nitendo neque proficit hilum? tum ... hlium Non. 121,4; 353, 8. fortasse etiam inexorabiles iudices, Minos et Rhadamanthus? apud quos nec te L. Crassus defendet defendet om. RK 1 ( add. 2 ) nec M. Antonius nec, quoniam apud Graecos iudices res agetur, poteris adhibere Demosthenen; demostenen K tibi ipsi pro te erit maxima corona causa dicenda. dicenda causa K haec fortasse metuis et idcirco mortem censes esse sempiternum malum. Adeone me delirare censes, ut ista esse credam? An tu ante G 1 haec non an tu an non ( 2. an in r. ) V 1? credis? Minime vero. Male hercule narras. Cur? quaeso. Quia disertus dissertus KR 1 esse possem, si contra ista dicerem. Quis enim non in eius modi causa? aut quid negotii est haec poëtarum et pictorum portenta convincere? aut convincere Non. 375, 29 1.11. Atqui pleni libri sunt contra ista ipsa disserentium dissenentium G 1 (dissotium corr. G 1? ) RV 1 ( corr. ipse? ) diserentium K philosophorum. Inepte sane. quis enim est est om. K 1, add. c tam excors, quem ista moveant? commoveant V 2 Si ergo apud inferos miseri non sunt, ne sunt quidem apud inferos ulli. Ita prorsus prossus G existimo. Ubi sunt Inde ab ubi - 223, 24 iam sunt multa in K madore corrupta ergo i, quos miseros dicis, aut quem locum incolunt? si enim sunt, nusquam esse non possunt. Ego vero nusquam esse illos puto. Igitur ne esse quidem? Prorsus isto modo, et tamen miseros miseros cf. Serv. Aen. 4, 20 ob id ipsum quidem, quidem om. K quia nulli sint.
6. Varro, On The Latin Language, 6.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.102-1.135, 1.159-1.214, 1.227-1.231, 1.250-1.634, 1.988-1.1082, 1.1102-1.1112, 2.67-2.79, 2.81, 2.168, 2.172, 2.184-2.307, 2.312-2.313, 2.317-2.380, 2.398-2.580, 2.1030-2.1039, 2.1041-2.1057, 2.1059-2.1062, 2.1081-2.1083, 2.1090-2.1117, 2.1122-2.1145, 2.1150-2.1174, 3.296-3.307, 3.417, 3.445-3.458, 3.670-3.783, 3.970-3.971, 4.35-4.41, 4.43, 4.129-4.140, 4.732-4.748, 4.760-4.761, 5.165-5.173, 5.186, 5.195-5.508, 5.772-5.919, 5.921-5.1457, 6.1-6.7, 6.26-6.27, 6.33-6.34, 6.36-6.38, 6.42-6.422, 6.1138-6.1286 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 2.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Ovid, Fasti, 1.325-1.328, 1.334, 1.384 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.325. Others think the ancients called this festival Agnalia 1.326. ‘of the lambs’, dropping a letter from its usual place. 1.327. Or because the victim fears the knife mirrored in the water 1.328. The day might be so called from the creature’s agony? 1.334. Must appease the gods with the mate of a woolly ewe. 1.384. Broken to the plough, lay their lives on the altar?
10. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.416-1.437, 6.395, 8.132, 8.156 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Ovid, Tristia, 4.7.11-4.7.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 2.2.12 (1st cent. BCE

13. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.674-7.675 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.674. blew a wild signal on a shepherd's horn 7.675. outflinging her infernal note so far
14. Vergil, Georgics, 2.9-2.82, 2.136-2.176 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.9. Hither, O Father of the wine-press, come 2.10. And stripped of buskin stain thy bared limb 2.11. In the new must with me. 2.12. First, nature's law 2.13. For generating trees is manifold; 2.14. For some of their own force spontaneous spring 2.15. No hand of man compelling, and posse 2.16. The plains and river-windings far and wide 2.17. As pliant osier and the bending broom 2.18. Poplar, and willows in wan companie 2.19. With green leaf glimmering gray; and some there be 2.20. From chance-dropped seed that rear them, as the tall 2.21. Chestnuts, and, mightiest of the branching wood 2.22. Jove's Aesculus, and oaks, oracular 2.23. Deemed by the Greeks of old. With some sprouts forth 2.24. A forest of dense suckers from the root 2.25. As elms and cherries; so, too, a pigmy plant 2.26. Beneath its mother's mighty shade upshoot 2.27. The bay-tree of placeName key= 2.28. Nature imparted first; hence all the race 2.29. of forest-trees and shrubs and sacred grove 2.30. Springs into verdure. Other means there are 2.31. Which use by method for itself acquired. 2.32. One, sliving suckers from the tender frame 2.33. of the tree-mother, plants them in the trench; 2.34. One buries the bare stumps within his field 2.35. Truncheons cleft four-wise, or sharp-pointed stakes; 2.36. Some forest-trees the layer's bent arch await 2.37. And slips yet quick within the parent-soil; 2.38. No root need others, nor doth the pruner's hand 2.39. Shrink to restore the topmost shoot to earth 2.40. That gave it being. Nay, marvellous to tell 2.41. Lopped of its limbs, the olive, a mere stock 2.42. Still thrusts its root out from the sapless wood 2.43. And oft the branches of one kind we see 2.44. Change to another's with no loss to rue 2.45. Pear-tree transformed the ingrafted apple yield 2.46. And stony cornels on the plum-tree blush. 2.47. Come then, and learn what tilth to each belong 2.48. According to their kinds, ye husbandmen 2.49. And tame with culture the wild fruits, lest earth 2.50. Lie idle. O blithe to make all Ismaru 2.51. One forest of the wine-god, and to clothe 2.52. With olives huge Tabernus! And be thou 2.53. At hand, and with me ply the voyage of toil 2.54. I am bound on, O my glory, O thou that art 2.55. Justly the chiefest portion of my fame 2.56. Maecenas, and on this wide ocean launched 2.57. Spread sail like wings to waft thee. Not that I 2.58. With my poor verse would comprehend the whole 2.59. Nay, though a hundred tongues, a hundred mouth 2.60. Were mine, a voice of iron; be thou at hand 2.61. Skirt but the nearer coast-line; see the shore 2.62. Is in our grasp; not now with feigned song 2.63. Through winding bouts and tedious preluding 2.64. Shall I detain thee. 2.65. Those that lift their head 2.66. Into the realms of light spontaneously 2.67. Fruitless indeed, but blithe and strenuous spring 2.68. Since Nature lurks within the soil. And yet 2.69. Even these, should one engraft them, or transplant 2.70. To well-drilled trenches, will anon put of 2.71. Their woodland temper, and, by frequent tilth 2.72. To whatso craft thou summon them, make speed 2.73. To follow. So likewise will the barren shaft 2.74. That from the stock-root issueth, if it be 2.75. Set out with clear space amid open fields: 2.76. Now the tree-mother's towering leaves and bough 2.77. Darken, despoil of increase as it grows 2.78. And blast it in the bearing. Lastly, that 2.79. Which from shed seed ariseth, upward win 2.80. But slowly, yielding promise of its shade 2.81. To late-born generations; apples wane 2.82. Forgetful of their former juice, the grape 2.136. But lo! how many kinds, and what their names 2.137. There is no telling, nor doth it boot to tell; 2.138. Who lists to know it, he too would list to learn 2.139. How many sand-grains are by Zephyr tossed 2.140. On placeName key= 2.141. With fury on the ships, how many wave 2.142. Come rolling shoreward from the Ionian sea. 2.143. Not that all soils can all things bear alike. 2.144. Willows by water-courses have their birth 2.145. Alders in miry fens; on rocky height 2.146. The barren mountain-ashes; on the shore 2.147. Myrtles throng gayest; Bacchus, lastly, love 2.148. The bare hillside, and yews the north wind's chill. 2.149. Mark too the earth by outland tillers tamed 2.150. And Eastern homes of Arabs, and tattooed 2.151. Geloni; to all trees their native land 2.152. Allotted are; no clime but placeName key= 2.153. Black ebony; the branch of frankincense 2.154. Is placeName key= 2.155. of balsams oozing from the perfumed wood 2.156. Or berries of acanthus ever green? 2.157. of Aethiop forests hoar with downy wool 2.158. Or how the Seres comb from off the leave 2.159. Their silky fleece? of groves which placeName key= 2.160. Ocean's near neighbour, earth's remotest nook 2.161. Where not an arrow-shot can cleave the air 2.162. Above their tree-tops? yet no laggards they 2.163. When girded with the quiver! Media yield 2.164. The bitter juices and slow-lingering taste 2.165. of the blest citron-fruit, than which no aid 2.166. Comes timelier, when fierce step-dames drug the cup 2.167. With simples mixed and spells of baneful power 2.168. To drive the deadly poison from the limbs. 2.169. Large the tree's self in semblance like a bay 2.170. And, showered it not a different scent abroad 2.171. A bay it had been; for no wind of heaven 2.172. Its foliage falls; the flower, none faster, clings; 2.173. With it the Medes for sweetness lave the lips 2.174. And ease the panting breathlessness of age. 2.175. But no, not Mede-land with its wealth of woods 2.176. Nor Ganges fair, and Hermus thick with gold
15. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.3, 1.1.8, 2.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 24.18, 82.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adynata Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
aetna Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
analogy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
animals, domesticated Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
animals, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
animals, origin and growth of Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
athens Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
aëtius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
body, metaphor for speech and text, greek Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body, metaphor for speech and text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
body Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
bougonia Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243, 245
callimachus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
causation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
centaurs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
circe Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
clash of atoms Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
coroebus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
corpus architecturae Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
creation Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
cycle of growth and decay, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
cyclopes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
de architectura, and greek knowledge Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
de architectura, universalizing Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
death, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
definition Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
demonic possession Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
design/purpose Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
deucalion and pyrrha Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
dreams Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
earth Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243, 245
epicureanism, epicureans Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
etymology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
evolution Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
fear, experienced by animals Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
finales, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
friendship Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
giants Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
gods, divine control (lack of) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
gods, providence Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
grafting Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 211
gravitation Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
herodotus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
horses Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
hybrids Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243, 245
intelligent design Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
laudes italiae Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209
linus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
livy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209, 211
lucretius, animals in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
lucretius, cycle of growth and decay in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, death in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
lucretius, myth in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
madness, insanity, mental disorder Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
maecenas Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 211
maiestas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
marsyas Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
mechanical movements Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
metamorphosis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
meteorology, thunder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
meteorology Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 88
minotaur Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
monsters Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123, 209
myth, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
myth, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209
natural phenomena Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
oikonomia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
palaephatus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
philosophers Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22; Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
polemics Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
proems, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
prometheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
python Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
religio Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
remythologization Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
science Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
seneca the elder Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
size Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
society Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
spontaneity' Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
spontaneity Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 245
strabo Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
time Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
trees Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 209, 211
typhoeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
universe Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
utilitasutility Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vacuum, void Rohmann, Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity (2016) 155
varro Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 243
venus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 22
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
vitruvius, and history Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, auctoritas Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
vitruvius, doubts about reliability Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
volumina Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 103
xenophanes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123
zoogony Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 123